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Discussion Looking for LITA members to help plan LITA President's Program on UX

by Rachel Vacek on Mon, Mar 2, 2015 at 09:46 am
in LITA/ User Experience

Attention all UX fans!

Lou Rosenfeld, Information Architecture and User Experience expert of polar bear book fame, has agreed to be the speaker for my LITA President's Program at ALA Annual in San Francisco, CA.  It's taking place on Sunday, June 28, from 3-4 pm.  Here's more info: http://www.ala.org/lita/conferences/annual/2015

Attention all UX fans!

Lou Rosenfeld, Information Architecture and User Experience expert of polar bear book fame, has agreed to be the speaker for my LITA President's Program at ALA Annual in San Francisco, CA.  It's taking place on Sunday, June 28, from 3-4 pm.  Here's more info: http://www.ala.org/lita/conferences/annual/2015

I need your help!  He's going to be in town for a few days, and for the day of his talk, and potentially for some time after his talk, we need to be sure he's taken care of. There might be opportunities to have a meal with him.  I'd also like to organize some type of activity that engages the LITA membership on the topic of UX leading up to the event.  We'll also need to work closely with the newly formed LITA Communications & Marketing Committee to help advertise.

In short, I'm looking for some volunteers for a 2015 LITA President's Program Planning Team that would like to help me plan the event and his visit - so everyone involved has a good experience (see what I did there?).

I don't think your physical presence is required to help with the planning, but obviously I'll need a few people on site to help with logistics.

If you are interested or have questions, please contact me:  revacek@uh.edu.  I'd like to have the team put together by next week, so you have until Sunday, March 8th to contact me.

Thanks, and feel free to share this info with those you think might be interested.

Rachel Vacek,
LITA President

 

 

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Online Doc CALM at ALA Midwinter 2015 Minutes

by Elizabeth Call on Mon, Mar 2, 2015 at 09:17 am
in ALA/SAA/AAM Joint Committee

Attached are the minutes for the CALM meeting at ALA Midwinter 2015, January 31, 2015.

Online Doc ACRL Science & Technology Section (STS) Information Literacy committee VIRTUAL Midwinter Meeting MINUTES

by Bonnie Fong on Sun, Mar 1, 2015 at 06:09 pm
in ACRL STS Information Literacy Committee (Science and Technology Section)

ACRL STS Information Literacy committee

“2015 Midwinter (Virtual) Meeting” Minutes

Wednesday, January 7, 2015 at 1pm – 2pm EST

 

In attendance: Bonnie Fong (co-chair), Kathleen Gregory (co-chair), Laksamee Putnam, Eric Snajdr, Dominique Turnbow, Cherie Turner, Brian Young

 

ACRL STS Information Literacy committee

“2015 Midwinter (Virtual) Meeting” Minutes

Wednesday, January 7, 2015 at 1pm – 2pm EST

 

In attendance: Bonnie Fong (co-chair), Kathleen Gregory (co-chair), Laksamee Putnam, Eric Snajdr, Dominique Turnbow, Cherie Turner, Brian Young

 

Absent: Spencer Davis (excused), Rebecca Miller (excused)

 

Recorder: Laksamee Putnam

 

Agenda

 

1. Approval ofminutes from “2014 Introductory Meeting” on 8/8/2014

·         Minutes approved

2. Announcements

a) ACRL VolunteerForm

·         The form is available! If you are interested in continuing to serve on the STS IL committee, complete the form by February 15th. Some of your terms end in June 2015; others end June 2016. Either way, complete the form to confirm your interest in continuing on the committee.

b)ACRL Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education

·         The 3rd draft was posted in November 2014; responses were due back in December 2014.

·         Note the Next steps at the bottom:

  • “Early January. Two other ACRL groups are charged to review and provide feedback on near final drafts; these groups are the ACRLInformation Literacy Standards Committeeand the ACRLStandards Committee.

  • January 16, 2015. Task force members expect to submit a final document and recommendations to the ACRL Board for their review and vote at the ALA Midwinter Meeting in Chicago.”

·         There was a brief discussion about what everyone is doing at their workplace. Generally, discussions are being held as each draft comes out and a response on behalf of the library is submitted.

 

3. Chat sub-committee update

  • Reminder that Bonnie is leading the Chat sub-committee and Kathleen is leading the Wiki sub-committee.

  • Kathleen will be the discussion leader for the next chat: January 15, 2015 3PM EST. She will discuss information literacy in the (science) lab, including strategies and challenges of working in a lab. The chat room link is:http://ala.adobeconnect.com/r3iyalk0m2i/

  • We need to brainstorm new chat ideas that are relevant to science and information literacy.

  • There was some discussion about archiving chat content

    • Current LibGuide:http://iue.libguides.com/sts-il-lwchat

    • Should we keep using this?

      • General agreement that the LibGuide format is ok, but wondering if it should stay on IUE servers given the changing makeup of the committee.

      • Maybe investigate moving the content to an ACRL-STS site.

4. Wiki sub-committee update

  • http://wikis.ala.org/acrl/index.php/Science_Information_Literacy

  • Originally, the goal was to update the wiki. However, spam on ACRL Wikis caused problems, resulting in all Wikis being locked down.

  • We need a more stable platform, so are trying to find a new platform to migrate to. Possibilities includes LibGuide, WordPress, or SharePoint.

  • Perhaps we should bring both the wiki and the chat together onto a single platform.

5. Sharing of committee member news

  • Bonnie: Giving 2 local presentations – one about campus partnerships to provide support for graduate students; one about creating a library presence for online courses.

  • Laksamee: Running The Big Read Grant this semester in Baltimore. More information is available here:http://libraries.towson.edu/big-read

  • Kathleen: Teaching an information literacy class for library science students in Germany!

  • Brian: Presenting at ACRL about a small internal grant to incentivize liberal arts faculty to transition to OERs

 

6. Adjourn

 

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Online Doc ACRL Instruction Section (IS) Information Literacy in the Disciplines (ILD) committee's VIRTUAL Midwinter Meeting MINUTES

by Bonnie Fong on Sun, Mar 1, 2015 at 06:07 pm
in ACRL IS Information Literacy in the Disciplines Committee (Instruction Section)

ACRL IS Information Literacy in the Disciplines committee

“2015 (Virtual) Midwinter Meeting”

iday, January 16, 2015 @ 12:00pm – 1:00pm EST

Virtual Meeting on AdobeConnect

 

ACRL IS Information Literacy in the Disciplines committee

“2015 (Virtual) Midwinter Meeting”

iday, January 16, 2015 @ 12:00pm – 1:00pm EST

Virtual Meeting on AdobeConnect

 

In attendance: Bonnie L. Fong (Chair), Linda Kott (Vice-Chair), Desirae Zingarelli-Sweet (Secretary), Elizabeth Berman, Diane M. Fulkerson, Melissa Gold, Christine Iannicelli, Diana Symons

 

Absent: Elizabeth Andrejasich Gibes (excused)

 

Agenda

 

1. E-mail listserv

  • We have a new e-mail listserv address (due to spam on the previous one): IS-ILD@lists.ala.org

  • Bonnie will send another test message out to specifically ask those who didn’t respond previously (in late November) to respond this time around

 

2. ACRL VolunteerForm

  • Fill out this form by 2/15/2015 to indicate your interest in volunteering for this committee or another ACRL committee

 

3. Information Literacy in the Disciplines wiki

 a) Review of subject area assignments:·        

 b) Migration from ACRL wiki

  • Due to spam on the ACRL wikis, our wiki has been on lock-down. We need to consider options for migrating existing content to a new platform. Options include WordPress or Drupal.  With WordPress, we would be moving to a temporary WordPress site for now, and then migrating again later to a permanent WordPress site (once the new ACRL IS site is up - around the time of the ALA Annual Conference).

 c) WordPress / Drupal training

  • Although Drupal training is available, it seems more complex, with coding required.

  • The committee would prefer to use WordPress. Migrating would likely involve a lot of copying and pasting. Once we migrate from the wiki to a temporary WordPress site, further migration to the permanent WordPress site should be relatively simple.  

  • Before migration, however, we’ll need to explore how to structure the WordPress site. Bonnie will take a look at some existing sites. Committee members are encouraged to send recommendations of sites to look at to Bonnie. We will continue the conversation via e-mail.

  • Two suggestions for sites to look at include:

 

4.ACRL Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education

  • The 3rd draft was shared in November, with feedback due back in December.

  • We have 2 committee members who are part of the Task Force - Elizabeth Berman & Diane Fulkerson - and they shared a couple of updates:

    • The ACRL Information Literacy Standards Committee & ACRL Standards Committee have reviewed the latest draft (which incorporated feedback received based on draft #3), made recommendations, and approved them.

    • The ACRL Executive Board of Directors will have an open meeting at the ALA Midwinter Meeting on Saturday, January 31, 2015, at 1:30pm.

 

5. Sharing of committee member news

  • Christine will be presenting a workshop at the ACRL Conference about research design for librarians on Thursday, at 1pm.

  • Diana Symons just submitted the final draft of a book chapter about data management in libraries. The book will be part of the “21st Century Academic Librarianship" series published by Scarecrow/Rowman & Littlefield. The chapter will be in Volume 4 and is scheduled to be out in Fall 2015.

  • Diane Fulkerson will be presenting at the Florida Library Association on the Information Literacy Framework.

  • Desirae Zingarelli-Sweet has an article in RUSA's Academic BRASS newsletter about peer reference for business students.

  • Bonnie Fong and her colleagues will be piloting the use of iPads in library instruction.

  • Most committee members plan to attend the ALA Annual Conference. Hopefully, members of the committee will be able to meet in person.

 

6. Adjourn

 

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Discussion Recommended Skills

by Christina Manzo on Sun, Mar 1, 2015 at 01:44 pm
in 21st Century Skills Discussion Group

Hello everyone. I am new to the group and new to the ALA, but I am really interested in learning new skills and technologies that will make me valuable to the library where I work. I know all the basics (HTML, CSS, XML etc.) as well as some new technologies (3D printing introduction etc.) but I am wondering what skills will make and keep me a valuable employee in today's market. I'm always up for learning something new!

Online Doc Dec. 1 deadline for ALCTS 2015 Publication Awards nominations

by Keri Cascio-IL (staff) on Fri, Feb 27, 2015 at 08:08 pm
in ALCTS

Nominations are being accepted for the 2015 Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS) awards for excellence in publication. ALCTS presents two Publication Awards to honor individuals for outstanding achievement in research and writing in the field of library collections and technical services.  
            If you are interested in nominating a publication for either of the awards, contact the chair of that award jury. The deadline for nominations and supporting materials is Dec. 1.

Nominations are being accepted for the 2015 Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS) awards for excellence in publication. ALCTS presents two Publication Awards to honor individuals for outstanding achievement in research and writing in the field of library collections and technical services.  
            If you are interested in nominating a publication for either of the awards, contact the chair of that award jury. The deadline for nominations and supporting materials is Dec. 1.

  • Edward Swanson Memorial Best of LRTS Award:

            The award is given in honor of Edward Swanson, LRTS Book Review Editor and long time indexer, to the author(s) of the best paper published in Library Resources & Technical Services (LRTS), the official journal of ALCTS.  The winner will receive a citation and $250 from ALCTS.  Papers published in volume 58 (2014) are eligible for consideration, with the exception of official reports and documents, obituaries, letters to the editor and biographies of award winners.  Each paper will be judged on the following points: content with a significant contribution about one or more issues addressed by ALCTS and its sections; statements in the paper are adequately supported by accurate data and/or documentation; and clear and readable writing style.

Send nominations, along with the author, title and volume and issue of the paper being nominated and the reasons for the nomination to:  Art Miller, chair, Best of LRTS Jury, afmiller@princeton.edu

                        Visit the Edward Swanson Best of LRTS Award page for more information:

            

  • ALCTS Outstanding Publication Award:

            The award honors an author or authors who have written the year’s outstanding monograph, article or original paper in the field of technical services, including acquisitions, cataloging, collection management, preservation, continuing resources and related areas in the library field.  The award consists of a citation and $250 contributed by ALCTS.  Works published in 2014 are eligible.  Reprints of earlier publications will not be considered.  The evaluation criteria include:  intellectual content; practical value; theoretical value; scholarship; presentation; and style.  Papers published in Library Resources & Technical Services (LRTS) are not eligible.

Send nominations, along with a statement giving the full bibliographic citation of the article, book or paper being nominated and reasons for the nomination to:  Rene Erlandson, chair, Publication Jury, rerlandson@unomaha.edu

                        Visit the Outstanding Publication Award page for more information:

           

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Online Doc Latest Latest draftof Orientation for Congress document

by Jill Vassilakos-Long on Fri, Feb 27, 2015 at 05:46 pm
in GODORT Federal Documents Task Force (Government Documents Round Table)

2015_02_27 DRAFT of Orientation Document for Congress

One of the responsibilities of Members of the United States Congress is to keep the citizenry informed of the actions of the federal government. This is necessary for

2015_02_27 DRAFT of Orientation Document for Congress

One of the responsibilities of Members of the United States Congress is to keep the citizenry informed of the actions of the federal government. This is necessary for

  • voters to understand and support needed policies
  • researchers  to build on federally funded research (without excellent access to past results they would waste resources "re-inventing the wheel")
  • policy  makers to craft policies that move us forward: avoiding pitfalls and  incorporating successes from policies implemented in the past
  • historians and commentators to understand the impetus for past policy decisions
  • students to be inspired to become the next generation of our leaders
  • entrepreneurs to evaluate business locations and product demand

 

Congress established the Federal  Depository Library Program (FDLP)  as one way to meet their obligation to keep  the public informed.  It  gave the Government Publishing Office (GPO) the  responsibility of running the  program and the Joint  Committee on Printing oversight. Members of Congress can designate 2  libraries in their district as depository libraries.  Senators can designate 2 libraries in their state.  To find out if there is a current opening for a new designation,  contact the Superintendent of Documents. Libraries that commit to  housing these government publications appoint at least one librarian to learn the intricacies of government resources to assist the public in finding the information they seek. This partnership between Congress, libraries and the GPO results in one-on-one professional research assistance for local constituents. 

 

Every aspect of this service, from collecting the information to disseminating it; from providing access to publications to preserving them for future access, has become more complex as information is increasingly made available through the internet. 

 

Federal agencies put publications up on  their websites, then take them down, without considering future access.  The Chesapeake Digital Preservation Group  survey  found 51 % rate of  "link rot" for  dot-gov URLs over 6-year  period. If those publications  were sent to GPO, professionals would have created standardized metadata so  that they could be more easily discovered by the public and would have preserved an electronic copy so that the publication could be used well  into the future. When publications are sent to GPO to be printed, GPO rides the  print order to create copies to send to selected depositories. Those  libraries then take on the task of keeping the publications available to  the public in print or in microform. 

 

Naive people believe that everything can be found through Google. The truth is that Google does not create content, it simply points to information created by others. If they are not put up on internet servers for public access and maintained on internet servers for public access, then they are lost. Google cannot find what isn't there. 

 

Some policymakers believe that public agencies' statistical programs are competing with private publishers, when the truth is that private publishers who offer statistical publications or databases do so by utilizing data that has been gathered by public agencies. They may repackage it in useful ways, but they could never afford to gather it. Federal agency publications are not their competition, they are part of private publishers' supply chain. The statistics gathered by federal agencies are used by researchers and business people across the country. Citizens all want what is best for America. Accurate data is the foundation of making meaningful improvements. 

 

The information world has become more complex: 

 “The  simple fact is that no one knows    how much born-digital US Federal  government information has been created  or where it all is.” -- Jim  Jacobs, CRL Leviathan Conference. 

Leveraging the benefit of federal information resources through this partnership with information professionals at libraries in every congressional district throughout the country is simply brilliant. Members of Congress can help their  constituents get help by linking the  depository libraries on their  district web sites and the GPO directory  of depository libraries on  their web site. Find FDLP libraries your district here: http://catalog.gpo.gov/fdlpdir/FDLPdir.jsp

 

Bill Olbrich, government information specialist at the St. Louis Public Library was able to help concerned citizens with accurate information from both his state and federal government. He told us:

"The police shooting of un-armed Michael Brown in Ferguson, MO, on August 9, 2014, brought information requests explaining the actions of government agencies. While many questions asked about Missouri state legal practices, others queried the role of federal agencies. The United States Government Manual served as the starting point for understanding the Justice Department and the Civil Rights Commission. Their websites expanded that knowledge. The Commission’s website first announced it was streaming the Missouri State Advisory Committee meetings live. Justice Department statistics from Crime in the United States, 2013 and Law Enforcement Officers Killed and Assaulted, 2013 provided a realization beyond the numbers they gave. Finally, the Census Bureau’s incarceration statistics (1 Black male out of 3 will sit in a cell sometime in their life) drove home the incredible obstacles faced by American young Black males today." 

 

 

David Smith, a librarian at St. Clair County Library in Port Huron, Michigan who helped voters prior to a recent election reported:

 

"During   the last millage election for the library system, I would have several   people come in looking for population data for St. Clair County.  The   Census Bureau web site provided everything they could have asked for and  more.  Some patrons felt comfortable going on the site by themselves,   while others required some instruction to obtain the data they needed.    It was a good feeling being able to educate the voters before they  went  to the polls to cast their ballots.  Most people had never been to  the  web site before, and they were very impressed." 

 

Members  of Congress can assure that the depository libraries are able to serve  everyone by supporting funding for the "Public Information Programs of  the Superintendent of Documents" in the Government Publishing Office's  appropriations request.

 

 

 

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Discussion Latest Draft of Flyer to Legislators Concerning FDLP

by Timothy Dodge on Fri, Feb 27, 2015 at 12:00 pm
in GODORT Federal Documents Task Force (Government Documents Round Table)

Dear Colleagues,      Jill Vassilakos-Long has provided the latest draft of the flyer for legislators concerning the FDLP.   You may recall this was discussed at the FDTF meeting held in Chicago on Sunday, February 1 and also at the GODORT Membership and Steering Committee meetings.  Please see latest draft cut-andpasted below:      One of the responsibilities of Members of the United States Congress is to keep the

Dear Colleagues,      Jill Vassilakos-Long has provided the latest draft of the flyer for legislators concerning the FDLP.   You may recall this was discussed at the FDTF meeting held in Chicago on Sunday, February 1 and also at the GODORT Membership and Steering Committee meetings.  Please see latest draft cut-andpasted below:      One of the responsibilities of Members of the United States Congress is to keep the citizenry informed of the actions of the federal government. This is necessary for

  • voters to understand and support needed policies
  • researchers  to build on federally funded research (without excellent access to past results they would waste resources "re-inventing the wheel")
  • policy  makers to craft policies that move us forward: avoiding pitfalls and  incorporating successes from policies implemented in the past
  • historians and commentators to understand the impetus for past policy decisions
  • students to be inspired to become the next generation of our leaders
  • entrepreneurs to evaluate business locations and product demand

  Congress established the Federal  Depository Library Program (FDLP)  as one way to meet their obligation to keep  the public informed.  It  gave the Government Publishing Office (GPO) the  responsibility of running the  program and the Joint  Committee on Printing oversight. Members of Congress can designate libraries in their district as depository libraries.  Senators can designate 2 libraries in their state.  To find out if there is a current opening for a new designation,  contact the Superintendent of Documents. Libraries that commit to  housing these government publications appoint at least one librarian to learn the intricacies of government resources to assist the public in finding the information they seek. This partnership between Congress, libraries and the GPO results in one-on-one professional research assistance for local constituents.    Every aspect of this service, from collecting the information to disseminating it; from providing access to publications to preserving them for future access, has become more complex as information is increasingly made available through the internet.    Federal agencies put publications up on  their websites, then take them down, without considering future access.  The Chesapeake Digital Preservation Group  survey  found 51 % rate of  "link rot" for  dot-gov URLs over 6-year  period. If those publications  were sent to GPO, professionals would have created standardized metadata so  that they could be more easily discovered by the public and would have preserved an electronic copy so that the publication could be used well  into the future. When publications are sent to GPO to be printed, GPO rides the  print order to create copies to send to selected depositories. Those  libraries then take on the task of keeping the publications available to  the public in print or in microform.    Naive people believe that everything can be found through Google. The truth is that Google does not create content, it simply points to information created by others. If they are not put up on internet servers for public access and maintained on internet servers for public access, then they are lost. Google cannot find what isn't there.    Some policymakers believe that public agencies' statistical programs are competing with private publishers, when the truth is that private publishers who offer statistical publications or databases do so by utilizing data that has been gathered by public agencies. They may repackage it in useful ways, but they could never afford to gather it. Federal agency publications are not their competition, they are part of private publishers' supply chain. The statistics gathered by federal agencies are used by researchers and business people across the country. Citizens all want what is best for America. Accurate data is the foundation of making meaningful improvements.    The information world has become more complex: 

  •  “The  simple fact is that no one knows    how much born-digital US Federal  government information has been created  or where it all is.” -- Jim  Jacobs, CRL Leviathan Conference. 

Leveraging the benefit of federal information resources through this partnership with information professionals at libraries in every congressional district throughout the country is simply brilliant. Members of Congress can help their  constituents get help by linking the  depository libraries on their  district web sites and the GPO directory  of depository libraries on  their web site. Find FDLP libraries your district here: http://catalog.gpo.gov/fdlpdir/FDLPdir.jsp   Bill Olbrich, government information specialist at the St. Louis Public Library was able to help concerned citizens with accurate information from both his state and federal government. He told us:           "The police shooting of un-armed Michael Brown in Ferguson, MO, on August 9, 2014, brought information requests explaining the actions of government agencies. While many questions asked about Missouri state legal practices, others queried the role of federal agencies. The United States Government Manual served as the starting point for understanding the Justice Department and the Civil Rights Commission. Their websites expanded that knowledge. The Commission’s website first announced it was streaming the Missouri State Advisory Committee meetings live. Justice Department statistics from Crime in the United States, 2013 and Law Enforcement Officers Killed and Assaulted, 2013 provided a realization beyond the numbers they gave (no statistics on shootings by police). Finally, the Census Bureau’s incarceration statistics (1 Black male with 3 will sit in a cell sometime in their life) drove home the incredible obstacles faced by American young Black males today."      David Smith, a librarian at St. Clair County Library in Port Huron, Michiganwho helped voters prior to a recent election reported:  

  • "During   the last millage election for the library system, I would have several   people come in looking for population data for St. Clair County.  The   Census Bureau web site provided everything they could have asked for and  more.  Some patrons felt comfortable going on the site by themselves,   while others required some instruction to obtain the data they needed.    It was a good feeling being able to educate the voters before they  went  to the polls to cast their ballots.  Most people had never been to  the  web site before, and they were very impressed." 

  Members  of Congress can assure that the depository libraries are able to serve  everyone by supporting funding for the "Public Information Programs of  the Superintendent of Documents" in the Government Publishing Office's  appropriations request.

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Discussion LLAMA MAES Hot Topics in Assessment Discussion Group - Summary of Midwinter 2015 discussion

by Tobeylynn Birch on Fri, Feb 27, 2015 at 05:28 pm
in LLAMA MAES (Measurement Assessment and Evaluation Section)

At ALA Midwinter 2015 in Chicago, about 30 brave souls ignored blizzard warnings on Sunday afternoon and stayed at McCormick Place to participate in the MAES Hot Topics in Assessment discussion on "Using Ethnographic Research in Library Assessment." To initiate discussion, we heard about four completed or in-process studies from:

At ALA Midwinter 2015 in Chicago, about 30 brave souls ignored blizzard warnings on Sunday afternoon and stayed at McCormick Place to participate in the MAES Hot Topics in Assessment discussion on "Using Ethnographic Research in Library Assessment." To initiate discussion, we heard about four completed or in-process studies from:

  • Terry Taylor, DePaul University
  • Kirsten Kinsley, Florida State University
  • Terri Fishel, Macalester College
  • Neely J. Tang, Cornell University

Attached is a summary of the presentations, a handout from one of the speakers, and a handout about a multi-institution life mapping project.

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