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  • 1.  Fwd: National Library Week kicks off with State of America’s Libraries Report, annual 'Top 10 Most Challenged Books' list and a new campaign to fight book bans

    Posted Apr 04, 2022 12:08 PM
    Colleagues:

    I am pleased to share the following information from the Office For Intellectual Freedom as National Library Week kicks off.

    The top 10 challenged books form 2021 are showcased, 50% of which are books related to the LGBTQ+ experience, and a large portion of the books are by non-white authors.  OIF has fielded over 700 challenges in the past year.  

    I encourage you to sign up for the Unite Against Book Bans efforts as we seek to keep information and books available to all.

    Peter

    Peter D. Coyl, MLIS (he/him)

    Library Director & CEO Sacramento Public Library

     

    ALA Councilor | Intellectual Freedom Round Table

    Member | ALA Intellectual Freedom Committee

    Vice President & Trustee | Freedom to Read Foundation


    ---------- Forwarded message ---------
    From: Kristin Pekoll via ALA Connect <Mail@connectedcommunity.org>
    Date: Mon, Apr 4, 2022 at 8:37 AM
    Subject: Intellectual Freedom Committee Community : National Library Week kicks off with State of America's Libraries Report, annual 'Top 10 Most Challenged Books' list and a new campaign to fight book bans
    To: <peterdcoyl@gmail.com>


    Press Release: www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2022/04/... State of America's Libraries Report 2022 Promotional Tools: www.ala.org/news/... ... -posted to the "Intellectual Freedom Committee Community" community
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    National Library Week kicks off with State of America's Libraries Report, annual 'Top 10 Most Challenged Books' list and a new campaign to fight book bans
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    Kristin Pekoll
    Apr 4, 2022 10:38 AM
    Kristin Pekoll

    Press Release: www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2022/04/...

    State of America's Libraries Report 2022 Promotional Tools: www.ala.org/news/...

    Retweet: twitter.com/ALALibrary/status/1511002156429680646

     

    National Library Week kicks off with State of America's Libraries Report, annual 'Top 10 Most Challenged Books' list and a new campaign to fight book bans

    Book challenges top 700 – the most since 2000

    CHICAGO -The American Library Association (ALA) kicks off National Library Week with the release of its State of America's Libraries Report, highlighting the challenges U.S. libraries faced in the second year of the pandemic – as well as the ways they innovated to meet the needs of their communities. 

    Library staff in every state faced an unprecedented number of attempts to ban books. ALA's Office for Intellectual Freedom tracked 729 challenges to library, school and university materials and services in 2021, resulting in more than 1,597 individual book challenges or removals. Most targeted books were by or about Black or LGBTQIA+ persons.

    "The 729 challenges tracked by ALA represent the highest number of attempted book bans since we began compiling these lists 20 years ago," said ALA President Patricia "Patty" Wong. "We support individual parents' choices concerning their child's reading and believe that parents should not have those choices dictated by others. Young people need to have access to a variety of books from which they can learn about different perspectives. So, despite this organized effort to ban books, libraries remain ready to do what we always have: make knowledge and ideas available so people are free to choose what to read."

    Below are the Top 10 Most Challenged Books of 2021:
     

    1. "Gender Queer," by Maia Kobabe
      Reasons: Banned, challenged, and restricted for LGBTQIA+ content and because it was considered to have sexually explicit images.
    1. "Lawn Boy," by Jonathan Evison
      Reasons: Banned and challenged for LGBTQIA+ content and because it was considered to be sexually explicit.
    1. "All Boys Aren't Blue," by George M. Johnson
      Reasons: Banned and challenged for LGBTQIA+ content, profanity, and because it was considered to be sexually explicit.
    1. "Out of Darkness," by Ashley Hope Perez
      Reasons: Banned, challenged, and restricted for depictions of abuse and because it was considered to be sexually explicit.
    1. "The Hate U Give," by Angie Thomas
      Reasons: Banned and challenged for profanity, violence, and because it was thought to promote an anti-police message and indoctrination of a social agenda.
    1. "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian," by Sherman Alexie
      Reasons: Banned and challenged for profanity, sexual references, and use of a derogatory term.
    1. "Me and Earl and the Dying Girl," by Jesse Andrews
      Reasons: Banned and challenged because it was considered sexually explicit and degrading to women.   
    1. "The Bluest Eye," by Toni Morrison
      Reasons: Banned and challenged because it depicts child sexual abuse and was considered sexually explicit.  
    1. "This Book is Gay," by Juno Dawson
      Reasons: Banned, challenged, relocated, and restricted for providing sexual education and LGBTQIA+ content.
    1. "Beyond Magenta," by Susan Kuklin
      Reasons: Banned and challenged for LGBTQIA+ content and because it was considered to be sexually explicit.

    Recent polling shows that seven in 10 voters oppose efforts to remove books from public libraries, including majorities of voters across party lines. Three-quarters of parents of public-school children (74%) express a high degree of confidence in school librarians to make good decisions about which books to make available to children, and when asked about specific types of books that have been a focus of local debates, large majorities say for each that they should be available in school libraries on an age-appropriate basis.

    The new poll is the first to approach the issue of book bans through the lenses of public and school libraries. It also found near-universal high regard for librarians and recognition of the critical role that public and school libraries play in their communities.

    In response to the uptick in book challenges and other efforts to suppress access to information, ALA will launch Unite Against Book Bans, a national initiative focused on empowering readers everywhere to stand together in the fight against censorship. More information is available at uniteagainstbookbans.org.

     

     

    Kristin

     

    Kristin Pekoll, CAE

    Assistant Director

    Office for Intellectual Freedom

     

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