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Gaming in Libraries Course Community

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Discussion Please Fill Out the Survey!

by Scott Nicholson on Sat, Aug 8, 2009 at 09:38 am

I've had over 250 people watch the final video, and only 26 have filled out the 10-question evaluation survey.

 

This is important!!  I have to justify to my funders that this course was worthwhile.

 

If you went through the course (or just went through enough of it so that it was meaningful), please visit

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=XmwNGir6vV4Qv9E9OU_2bgrQ_3d_3d

and fill out the survey.

 

Thank you.

 

Discussion Thanks for the course

by David Miller. Purple Pawn (non-member) on Sun, Jul 19, 2009 at 09:03 pm

I just cought up with the rest of the course.

I'm not a librarian or involved with a library, but nontheless enjoyed the course very much, and even learned a few new things.

Thank you very much.

Discussion Board Game Geeks & Funagain Games

by Christopher DeFrisco (non-member) on Thu, Jun 25, 2009 at 11:59 am

Hello. 

The Ashland Oregon library hosts a Teen Day and Board Game night once a month. The Teen Day is hosted entirely by the library, and the game night is mine. I am not a librarian, just a board game zealot (the kind Scott warned you about in an earlier video).

We have been extremely lucky, in that one of our librarians is a video game "guy" and provides all of the equipment for Guitar Hero, Dance Dance Revolution as well as being a Dungeon Master for an ongoing Dungeons & Dragons adventure. 

Hello. 

The Ashland Oregon library hosts a Teen Day and Board Game night once a month. The Teen Day is hosted entirely by the library, and the game night is mine. I am not a librarian, just a board game zealot (the kind Scott warned you about in an earlier video).

We have been extremely lucky, in that one of our librarians is a video game "guy" and provides all of the equipment for Guitar Hero, Dance Dance Revolution as well as being a Dungeon Master for an ongoing Dungeons & Dragons adventure. 

In the evening of the same day (3rd Saturday of the month) I host the Board Game night from 5 to 11pm. The vast majority of the board games are mine. So again, we are lucky to already have the games on hand.

However, Funagain Games (who we are very fortunate to have locallly) has been extremely supportive and has already donated a handful of games. Please go to their web site and check out their programs. Submitting a request for games will, at a minimum, get you a response. They are very enthusiastic and sincere about the idea of promoting board games, over-and-above any benefit it may garner them financially.

If you are interested in board games specifically (or Magic the gathering, Role playing games etc.) then consider posting a call-to-arms on the BoardGameGeek (boardgamegeek.com). I would be very suprised if you didn't locate local zealots like myself who would be happy to teach at your events, if not come with piles of games in tow.

 

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Discussion Contacting Local Businesses

by Noah Lewin on Fri, Jun 26, 2009 at 10:00 am

Scott, you mentioned that we should contact local businesses to be partners.  Here in NYC there are plenty of Game Stop shops.  Isn't that a chain?   They seem like a good place to go to ask for partnerships, but I'm thinking that it really can't be considered a local store.  What 's your opinion?

Discussion Live Video - Tuesday, June 23, 3pm Eastern

by Scott Nicholson on Sun, Jun 21, 2009 at 05:39 am

I'm going to try an experiment.

 

On Tuesday, June 23rd, I'm going to set up on UStream, which allows me to stream live video, and allows you to come and ask questions about gaming in libraries

 

So, we'll do a Q&A/Chat at 

 

http://www.ustream.tv/channel/gaming-in-libraries

 

Join us!  Tuesday, June 23rd from 3-4 pm Eastern.

Discussion "Testing" vs. "teaching" knowledge games

by Nancy Foasberg on Tue, Jun 16, 2009 at 11:00 am

I just watched this episode, and I was thinking about how knowledge games are described as games in which players bring to the table real-world knowledge they already have.

I just watched this episode, and I was thinking about how knowledge games are described as games in which players bring to the table real-world knowledge they already have. There's certainly some value in that, but what about games that teach real-world knowledge instead of testing it?  I am thinking of games like 1960: The Making of the President, in which the cards the players can use to influence the outcome of the election are tied into real events that happened at that time.  A lot of historical and wargames are like this--they are naturally strategy games, but I'm also tempted to call them knowledge games because they impart knowledge, but they aren't under the definition used here.  However, they are certainly "educational" and may be considered in a library program for some of the same reasons.  Well, many of them are too long, of course, but I do think they should fit in this rubric somewhere.

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Discussion Beyond libraries

by David Miller. Purple Pawn (non-member) on Sun, Jun 14, 2009 at 07:38 pm

As a hobbyist and semi-professional, I found this lesson particularly interesting. I've been reading and thinking more about game design recently. This approach, with its focus on the game playing experience, however, was new to me. I will be recommending it to game designers. And I look forward to the book.

Discussion Konnichiwa from Japan

by James Bruce (non-member) on Sun, Jun 7, 2009 at 06:15 am

Well, it seems from other posts that we have quite an eclectic mix of countries participating here, so I thought I'd throw in my nametag too. My name is James and I currently live and work in a university here in Kyoto, Japan. I and a close friend and colleague here also run a game club twice a week, mainly focussing on eurogames like Catan and Carcassonne but also short easy games like Blokus and Set. I've also recently started my Wii once a week, though my colleague isnt so keen on it and the students tend to get a little noisy ;)

Well, it seems from other posts that we have quite an eclectic mix of countries participating here, so I thought I'd throw in my nametag too. My name is James and I currently live and work in a university here in Kyoto, Japan. I and a close friend and colleague here also run a game club twice a week, mainly focussing on eurogames like Catan and Carcassonne but also short easy games like Blokus and Set. I've also recently started my Wii once a week, though my colleague isnt so keen on it and the students tend to get a little noisy ;)

The university is small but we have around 15 regulars and a lot of randoms who drop by when they can. Our biggest challenge has been getting recognition by the university to be an official club - they scoffed at the idea of games being a real extra-curricular activity (as opposed to a sports "game" club like volleyball). Now that one of the student committee members has joined Game Club, we may finally gain official recognition (next year sometime, and not yet as official sponsored club but merely as a "circle" of like-minded people). Although we arent technically gaming in a library as such, I'm hoping to learn a lot from this course - like how to market the idea and gain more members, some other good games suitable to our situations, and pointers on justifying the exisitence of a purely "gaming" club to the university.

 

Thank you, looking forward to participating when I can. 

James

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This group is designed as the primary discussion boards for those working through the Games in Libraries YouTube course which ran during June 2009.

You can watch all 30 videos in order over at http://www.gamesinlibraries.org/course/?page_id=117

Or, here is the embedded YouTube playlist that will play them all for you:

 

Join the group to view the discussions and participate. Conversation about the individual Sessions of the course can be found in the Discussions area, which you will find in the sidebar to the right. -->

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