Young Professionals Working Group Community

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by Audrey Hamelers on Mon, Jul 22, 2013 at 12:56 pm

ABOUT THE THINK TANK

Welcome to the Young Librarians Working Group Think Tank. All creative, enthusiastic, forward-thinking young librarians are invited to participate in the Working Group's efforts by providing feedback and comments on our projects, and making sure we're staying on track to a better ALA. Membership in the Think Tank is open to everyone.

ABOUT THE THINK TANK

Welcome to the Young Librarians Working Group Think Tank. All creative, enthusiastic, forward-thinking young librarians are invited to participate in the Working Group's efforts by providing feedback and comments on our projects, and making sure we're staying on track to a better ALA. Membership in the Think Tank is open to everyone.

We know you're all busy people, so we aren't asking for a big time commitment. Just tune in to our activities when you can and let us know what you think. Join our ALA Connect space (you're looking at it) and watch our blog for news and updates. Come and go as you like. Be as involved as you can, or just stop by occasionally.

Please click "Edit" and add your name and contact info if you plan to participate. Thanks, and welcome!

THINK TANK MEMBERS:

  1. Dennis Nangle, dnangle@umuc.edu
  2. Allie Flanary, allinee.flanary@pcc.edu
  3. Max Macias max.macias@gmail.com
  4. Ellen Corrigan, ekcorrigan@eiu.edu
  5. Bojana Skarich, skarich1@illinois.edu
  6. Jenny Emanuel, emanuelj@illinois.edu
  7. Hyun-Duck Chung, hyun_duck_chung@ncsu.edu
  8. Mari Kermit-Canfield, kermitt@ferris.edu
  9. Jason Griffey, griffey@gmail.com
  10. Katie Lockwood, klockwood@wschiro.edu
  11. Maura Seale, mms227@georgetown.edu
  12. Morgan Sohl, msohl@lincolncity.org
  13. Sarah Houghton-Jan, librarianinblack@gmail.com
  14. Peter Bromberg, pbromberg@princetonlibrary.org
  15. Candice A. Wing-Yee Mack, cmack@lapl.org
  16. Eboni M. Stokes, eboni.stokes@dc.gov
  17. Ellie Collier, ecollier@austincc.edu
  18. Bohyun Kim, bohyun.kim@fiu.edu
  19. Chaunacey Dunklee, cdunklee@gmail.com
  20. Ahniwa Ferrari, aferrari@secstate.wa.gov
  21. Lisa Gardinier, gardinierl@cochise.edu
  22. Lana Thelen, lthelen@ocom.edu
  23. Audra Eagle, audra.eagle@gmail.com
  24. Adrian Erb, aerb@austincc.edu
  25. Emily Symonds, emily.symonds@louisville.edu
  26. Derik Badman, dbadman@temple.edu
  27. Carrie Donovan, cdonovan@indiana.edu
  28. Rachel Slough, rslough@gmail.com
  29. Dominique Turnbow, dturnbow@ucsd.edu
  30. Ben Peck, bpeck2@conncoll.edu
  31. Brian McManus, bmcmanus@wsu.edu
  32. Stacey Costabile, stcostabile@gmail.com
  33. Aaron Dobbs aaron@thelibrarian.org
  34. John Watts, jowatts@umail.iu.edu
  35. lynda kellam, lmkellam@uncg.edu
  36. Floyd G. Council Sr, fcouncil@slpl.org
  37. Jeff Scott, jdscott@co.tulare.ca.us
  38. Paul Waak, pwaak@ntrls.org
  39. Michael Creedon, creedomi@bc.edu
  40. Jason Fields, jfields@hcplibrary.org
  41. Ashley Carr, acarr@austincc.edu
  42. Kelvin Watson, kelvin.watson@ars.usda.gov
  43. Aisha Harvey, aisha.harvey@duke.edu
  44. Eamon Tewell, etewell@moore.edu
  45. Joanna Gadsby, gadsby@umbc.edu
  46. Kristen Mastel, meye0539@umn.edu
  47. Carrie Gits, gits@nova.edu
  48. Tiffani Conner, tiffani.conner@lmunet.edu
  49. Melissa Bowles-Terry, mbowlest@uwyo.edu
  50. Kimberly Patton, kimpatton@kclibrary.org
  51. Michelle Chronister, michelle.chronister@gmail.com
  52. Keshia Garnett, kyshiag@gmail.com
  53. Kiyomi Deards kdd37@drexel.edu
  54. Baasil Wilder baasilt@hotmail.com
  55. Portia Latalladi chi.townreader@gmail.com
  56. Alexandra Rivera alexriv@umich.edu
  57. Jennifer Palmisano, jennifer.palmisano@gmail.com
  58. Erica Findley, erica.findley@pacificu.edu
  59. Annelise Sklar, asklar@ucsd.edu
  60. Karen E. Downing, kdown@umich.edu
  61. Lisa Carlucci Thomas, lisa.c.thomas@gmail.com
  62. Fiona Bradley, fiona.bradley@ifla.org
  63. Stacy Konkiel, stacy.konkiel@gmail.com | skonkiel@plos.org
  64. Mark Gottschalk, markgottschalk@gmail.com | markg@neill-lib.org
  65. Stacey Devine, stacey-devine@northwestern.edu
  66. Megan Hodge, mlhodge@gmail.com
  67. Jaime Hammond, jhammond@nvcc.commnet.edu
  68. Jennifer Peterson, petejenn@my.dom.edu
  69. Ray Lusk, ray.lusk@madisonlib.org
  70. Natalie Clewell, natalie.clewell@westgatech.edu
  71. Jessica Horvath, jessica.horvath@gmail.com
  72. Amy Harmon, amyaharmon@gmail.com
  73. Alexandra Janvey, alexandra.janvey@gmail.com
  74. Gretchen Caserotti, gcaserotti@darienlibrary.org
  75. Dan McPhillips, dan.mcphillips@gmail.com
  76. JaTara Barnes, jatara@jatarabarnes.com
  77. Anne Slaughter, aslaughter@oppl.org
  78. Nick Wilczek, nwilczek@lexpublib.org
  79. Catherine Scullion, cscullion@apl.org
  80. Kate Kosturski, librariankate7578@gmail.com
  81. Margaret Heller, mheller@dom.edu | margaret.heller@gmail.com
  82. Marisa Walstrum, marisa.walstrum@nl.edu | marisa.walstrum@gmail.com
  83. Julie Evener, jevener@usa.edu
  84. Brian Leaf, bdleaf@gmail.com
  85. Alissa Hafele, alissa.hafele@gmail.com
  86. Aimee Babcock-Ellis, aimeebe@gmail.com
  87. Nicole Pagowsky, nicolepagowsky@gmail.com
  88. Jenna Hecker, jennahecker@gmail.com
  89. Kristin Stout, kristin.stout@armstrong.edu
  90. Roberto C. Delgadillo, rdelgadillo@lib.ucdavis.edu
  91. Micah Vandegrift, micahvandegrift@gmail.com
  92. Teri Shiel, terishiel@gmail.com
  93. Ashley Parker, ashley.parker@arkansas.gov
  94. Eric Elliott, ehelliot29@gmail.com
  95. Chris Kyauk, chriskyauk@gmail.com
  96. Peter Coyl, peter.coyl@hdis.hc.edu.tw
  97. Michelle Baildon, baildon@mit.edu
  98. Alpha DeLap, adelap@uw.edu
  99. Frank Skornia, fskornia@gmail.com
  100. Rebecca Blakiston, blakistonr@u.library.arizona.edu
  101. Lauren Pressley, lauren@laurenpressley.com
  102. Jodie Borgerding, jborgerding80@webster.edu
  103. Julie Piacentine, juliepia@gmail.com
  104. Allison Coltin, allison.coltin@yahoo.com
  105. Mary Fran Daley LibrarianFran@gmail.com 
  106. Jo Alcock, jo@joeyanne.co.uk | twitter: @joeyanne
  107. Kelly Quaye, kcquaye@gmail.com
  108. Loida Garcia-Febo loidagarciafebo@gmail.com
  109. Miriam Rigby rigby@uoregon.edu
  110. Anna Pederson, apederson@stdl.org
  111. Melissa Cardenas-Dow, melissa_cardenasdow@redlands.edu
  112. Joseph Miscavige, joe.miscavige@gmail.com | twitter: @joeam & @imperviousrex 
  113. Sarah Singleton, ssingleton@gedsoulrecords.com
  114. Megan Sheils, sheilsmg@state.gov
  115. Jennifer Lau-Bond, jllaubond@gmail.com
  116. Carrie Kasperick, carrie.kasperick@gmail.com
  117. Stephanie Light Eames lighteames@gmail.com
  118. Amber Creger, monkeymoxie@gmail.com
  119. Teri Shiel, terishiel@gmail.com
  120. Michelle Donlin, mdonli1@lsu.edu
  121. Easter DiGangi, easter.digangi@uwalumni.com
  122. Susan Maldonado, smaldonado@oaklandlibrary.org
  123. Connie Harrison, connieharrison1@me.com
  124. Thomas Maluck, tmaluck@richlandlibrary.com
  125. Audrey Hamelers, hamelers@udel.edu
More...

Event Young Turks Unite! An ALA Anti-Reception

by Kim Leeder on Tue, Jan 15, 2013 at 04:40 pm

This social event, which over the last several years has been variously known as the Young Turks, Young Professionals, and Young Librarians event, and has been hosted in somewhat posh style by a series of ALA presidents and former presidents, is proud to announce that we've gone rogue!-- and returned to our roots.

This social event, which over the last several years has been variously known as the Young Turks, Young Professionals, and Young Librarians event, and has been hosted in somewhat posh style by a series of ALA presidents and former presidents, is proud to announce that we've gone rogue!-- and returned to our roots.

Young Turks Unite! is an anti-reception for the critical thinkers, the up-and-comers, and the true movers and shakers (LJ ratings do not apply) of the library world. If you have a fire in your heart and want to shake up the universe of what we call librarianship, you are invited to join a group of like-minded, passionate professionals for an evening of conversation, provocation, and perhaps even revolution.

Bring your ideas and ideals to this meeting of the minds as we revisit what it means to be a librarian in 2013.

RSVP at http://www.facebook.com/events/117172778456980/

Hosted by your friends at In the Library with the Lead Pipe: Brett Bonfield, Emily Ford, Eric Frierson (emeritus), and Kim Leeder.

More...

Online Doc An effort to equalize elections

by Kim Leeder on Sat, Mar 26, 2011 at 10:14 am

One of the subgroups in the Young Professionals Task Force has been exploring possibilities for equalizing elections to give young members a better chance at being elected to Council and other offices. It is a challenging topic, and we've realized that it might be easier to pilot an initiative ourselves than to simply pass it on to the ALA Executive Board with our recommendations.

One of the subgroups in the Young Professionals Task Force has been exploring possibilities for equalizing elections to give young members a better chance at being elected to Council and other offices. It is a challenging topic, and we've realized that it might be easier to pilot an initiative ourselves than to simply pass it on to the ALA Executive Board with our recommendations.

So here it is: a sortable, searchable spreadsheet of all those running for ALA Councilor at Large in the current, Spring 2011 election. Please take a look, share it widely, and let us know what you think.

Want to sort it? Here's how:

  1. You may want to open the spreadsheet in "Full Screen View" before editing.
  2. Use "Click to Edit" button at upper right (note: your changes will not affect the original).
  3. Click upper left corner of sheet to highlight all.
  4. Right-click anywhere on sheet.
  5. Choose Sort > Custom sort.
  6. Ensure "Contains header" box is checked.
  7. Click "OK."
More...

Online Doc Final Report with Appendices (DRAFT)

by Kim Leeder on Sat, Mar 26, 2011 at 10:17 am

 ALA Young Librarians Working Group

Final Report and Recommendations

Prepared for ALA Executive Board

June 11, 2010

 

ACTION REQUESTED/INFORMATION/REPORT:

To review and approve the recommendations from the Young Librarians Working Group regarding ALA better meeting the needs of young librarians.

 

ACTION REQUESTED BY:

Karen Downing, Co-Chair Young Librarians Task Force

 ALA Young Librarians Working Group

Final Report and Recommendations

Prepared for ALA Executive Board

June 11, 2010

 

ACTION REQUESTED/INFORMATION/REPORT:

To review and approve the recommendations from the Young Librarians Working Group regarding ALA better meeting the needs of young librarians.

 

ACTION REQUESTED BY:

Karen Downing, Co-Chair Young Librarians Task Force

Liz Bishoff, Co-Chair Young Librarians Task Force 

 

CONTACT PERSON:

Karen Downing, (734) 615-8610, kdown@umich.edu

Liz Bishoff, (303) 751-6277, Liz.Bishoff@gmail.com 

 

DRAFT OF MOTION:

We propose that the ALA Board accept the recommendations of the Young Librarians Task Force in order to be more responsive to the young librarians that will be its members and future leaders with a goal of increasing retention rates.    

                        

 

DATE:            June 11, 2010  

 

BACKGROUND:

Please read attachment.

 

 


ALA Young Librarians Working Group

Final Report and Recommendations

 

I. Introduction/Background

 

Camila Alire, as President-elect, created a Young Librarians Working Group to investigate ways to encourage young librarians to become better advocates for ALA and the profession. At the 2009 Annual Conference, ALA Executive Board established the Young Librarians Task Force (YLTF), expanding Working Group membership to include representatives from ALA divisions, round tables, and ethnic caucuses (see Appendix I for YLTF charge and membership). The YLTF has prepared the following thirteen recommendations for ALA to use in recruiting and retaining young librarians.

 

II. Recommendations

 

Membership

  1. By 2011, ALA will track its retention rate for members aged 35 and under, create annual goals and plans for improvement, and post this information on ALA’s website and include it in the Executive Director's report for ALA membership and Council meetings.
  2. By 2013, ALA will offer discounted "electronic publications only" membership.
  3. By 2014, ALA will partner with state/regional chapters for discounted dual membership, heightening the value of membership and streamlining the dues process.

 

Organizational Changes

  1. By 2011, ALA will establish a task force to monitor and promote activities across the association that focus on recruiting and engaging young professionals. 
  2. By 2012, ALA will partner with NMRT to create New Members Interest Groups (NMIG) across all units and create a Coordinating Committee to foster cross-promotion.
  3. By 2012, ALA will replace the current voting system with one that equalizes candidates and improves opportunities for younger candidates. This software should enable voters to sort candidates based on their experience and include photographs and personal profiles.

 

Participation

  1. By 2012, ALA will institute a deadline for committee appointments and notify unselected volunteers about their alternatives (e.g. ALAConnect or Discussion Groups).
  2. By 2012, ALA will recognize entirely virtual committees, which place every member on equal footing when it comes to participation.
  3. By 2012, Annual will offer more participatory programs, e.g. workshops and discussions.
  4. By 2013, ALA Annual will offer Division-hosted conferences within ALA Conference.
  5. Committee work, aside from articles or presentations, is too often unnoticed. By 2013, ALA will provide tools for units to share the work of their member committees.
  6. By 2013, ALA will make Midwinter attendance optional for service on committees and offer an option for electronic participation at one conference per year.
  7. By 2013, ALA will complete an analysis of each standing committee’s charge, assess whether its charge remains relevant, and determine whether the committee should be disbanded, modified, or maintained. This review should be repeated every five years.

 

Appendix I: Task Force Charge and Membership

 

Charge

The Task Force will identify strategies and actions for ALA, its offices, committees, divisions and round tables to be more responsive to the young librarians who will be its members and future leaders with a goal of increasing retention rates.    

 

The Task Force will develop a recommended plan of action with short, medium, and long-term goals for ALA to better meet the needs of young librarians.

 

To do that the Task Force will:

  • Investigate what affiliates and other professional associations are doing to integrate young professionals into the profession and association.
  • Collect and review data on what young librarians need from ALA.
  • Review ALA activities already underway that may address the needs of young librarians, such as electronic participation.
  • Review how ALA divisions have reorganized to streamline processes, and assess if this has resulted in improved involvement and retention of young librarians.

 

Membership

Lizbeth Bishoff (co-chair)

Karen E. Downing (co-chair)

Sonia Alcantara-Antoine

Xima Avalos

Laurel Bliss

Brett Bonfield 

Emily Ford

Eric Frierson

Kim Leeder

Katherine O’Clair

Alexandra Rivera

Patricia Smith

Kelvin Watson

Jen-chien Yu

John Chrastka (ALA Staff Liaison)

 

Subcommittees

The Task Force functioned through the work of three subcommittees who focused on different areas of the issue, gathered information, and made recommendations that serve as the foundation of this report. Their individual charges and results are included as Appendices II, III, and IV.

 


Appendix II

Focus Area: Other Professional Associations

 

Introduction

This subcommittee used positive deviance methodology (www.positivedeviance.org/) to identify associations that deviate in a positive way from the norm because they are exceptionally good at achieving a specific result. In this instance, the result we hoped to identify was an exceptional ability to retain members aged thirty-five and under.

 

The subcommittee contacted approximately sixty of ALA's peer associations (see below for a list) and asked four simple questions in order to identify positive deviants:

  1.  How many members do you have?
  2.  What percentage are under 35?
  3.  What is your overall retention rate?
  4.  What is your retention rate for people under 35?

 

Summary of Findings

Twenty organizations responded. The associations ranged in size from 300 to almost 350,000 members. The percentage of members under age 35 ranged from 8% to 32% (though the latter percentage, something of an outlier, was based on a survey that included only 60% of the association's membership). Overall retention rates ranged from 65-70% to 98%. No association we contacted, including ALA, tracked retention based on its members' age.

 

Conclusion

Our research method, positive deviance, is quick and inexpensive, but it works best when there are positive outliers that are willing to share their methods. In this instance—associations measuring their ability to recruit and retain younger members, and publicizing their results—there appears to be a void. Therefore, ALA can become the de facto (and default) leader in the conversation by publicizing its methods, goals, and results. As associations join the conversation, they can compare the relative merits of their efforts, refine their techniques, and create organizations that are more welcoming to professionals in many fields, including librarianship.

 

~Supplemental Information~

 

Organizations Contacted

 

Appendix III

Focus Area: Gathering Feedback from Young Librarians

 

Introduction 

The subcommittee was charged with promoting discussion about why young librarians are (or are not) ALA members in order to better understand how ALA might be more responsive to their needs. In order to solicit broad input to the question, “What would make ALA a better fit for you?” we invited responses from ALA members and non-members on paper, on Twitter using #youngturks, on ALA Connect (163 members), on Facebook (259 members), we held a Text-a-thon (23 responses), we created a Think Tank (84 members), solicited email and YouTube videos, and created, distributed, and analyzed an online survey (150 responses). Analysis of the responses fall into the following categories:

 

1. Conferences 

Many of our respondents were not impressed with the value ALA Annual or Midwinter provided to them. While the cost of attending ALA is not very different from other library conferences, the perceived value of the events are lower than others mentioned. The way respondents define value is different, but all revolve around notions of relevance, networking, and interaction with others. Our findings all point to the need for more interactivity and stronger pathways into relevant parts of ALA for young librarians. 

 

2.   Membership

Membership dues are too steep for many young librarians. While there is a gradual increase in price from student member to three-years-experienced members, other membership options might attract or retain more young librarians.

 

  1. 3.      Involvement/Engagement 

Participation in association committees and governance provides a source of both satisfaction and frustration for our respondents. The cost associated with physically attending conferences often prevents travel, which, in turn, gives people the feeling that they cannot participate.  

 

Conclusion

Young librarians were overwhelmed by ALA’s size and their perception of its impenetrability. Creating more obvious pathways into the organization will help alleviate barriers to participation, as will more venues for electronic participation.

 

~Supplemental Information~

 

Compilation of Responses by Issue

 

1. ALA Conferences

Many of our respondents were not impressed with the value ALA Annual or Midwinter provided to them. While the cost of attending ALA is not very different from other library conferences, the perceived value of the events are lower than others mentioned. The way respondents define value is different, but all revolve around notions of relevance, networking, and interaction with others.

 

A. Session Formats: Pleas for Greater Interactivity

"Fewer panel presentations @ conference. More posters, workshops, and interaction.

Encourage more active learning oriented conference programming and less 'show and tell'"

 

Lackluster conference presentations are not unique to ALA, however this respondent makes a plea for interactivity. They would like ALA to focus on those sessions that allow more networking, more hands-on learning, and more one-to-one conversations.

 

B. Participant-driven Programming: Relevance and Interactivity

"ALA needs to have an organic quality to it more along the lines of the MIGs-it needs to be easier to start new discussion groups and better ways to encourage research & presentation w/in the larger org. & divisions."

 

This comment speaks to both the relevance of general sessions and the importance of interactivity at conferences. Discussion groups are often perceived as more valuable for many people because of their focus and their format. Discussion groups and Membership Interest Groups should be highlighted more prominently as exciting aspects of conference to drive people to the kind of experience they want.

 

C. Size and Scope Obscure Relevant Conference Content

"I have found smaller, more narrowly focused organizations that are more relevant to my career interests."

 

While ALA is defined by its all-inclusive nature, many people feel short-changed when they don't find enough experiences relevant to their jobs. While general sessions should address issues of all libraries, more emphasis should be placed on the contributions of divisions (which are also the source of value for membership in ALA). Perhaps having “conferences within ALA conference,” where divisions can highlight their programs, committee meetings, and gatherings may help emphasize relevant content for attendees.

 

D. Two Meetings a Year is Too Much

"I actually enjoy ALA conferences. Although I think we should probably move to just one conference a year, I really enjoy my time at both conferences."

 

"My work pays for me to go and I really want to get involved in ALA committee work, but they can’t afford to send me to two ALA conferences a year."

 

"Two conferences a year is too expensive for people not making a sizable salary (and most of us don't)."

 

Young librarians in particular have lower salaries because of their inexperience. While no librarian makes a lot of money, two conferences a year are cost-prohibitive to those making entry-level salaries and favor those with longevity. As a result, participation in committees, discussion groups, and the conferences, especially at Midwinter, favor those librarians with seniority and longevity, dampening the voice of new professionals.

 

E. Networking

All participants that have a positive view of the conferences cited their colleagues and networking, not programming or events, as the source of the value they derived from attendance:

 

"To me, the most valuable part of being active at conferences has been getting to know my colleagues from across the nation. Working with all these people has inspired me and taught me a lot about librarianship."

 

"I've met wonderful, creative, inspiring people through ALA and I love getting to see them at conference and meeting new people every time."

 

"People who are so smart and innovative... it's exciting to go to conference and hear what their projects are and keeps me energized about the profession."

 

2.   Membership

Membership dues are too steep for many young librarians. While there is a gradual increase in price from student member to three-years-experienced members, other membership options might attract or retain more young librarians.

 

A. Membership Dues

"Cheap membership dues and conference registration fees for the unemployed" 

 

"More partnership with regional library associations for joint membership pricing"

"More options re: tiered membership pricing" 

 

"My library school offered dual membership to TLA and ALA for one price, so I was able to be a member of both organizations while in library school for the price of one." 

 

Membership dues are too steep for many librarians. While there is a gradual increase in price from student member to three-years-experienced members, other membership options, including lower cost, electronic-only memberships could be offered for those who do not wish to receive paper communication from the association. Partnering with regional chapters for discounted dual membership is also a way to heighten the value of membership and streamline the membership process for members.

 

B. Membership Benefits

"I actually think ALA can learn much from Web Junction. Providing an infrastructure for communication was the beginning, now ALA needs to add content, classes, webinars, and more for free (to members). That would be a draw." 

 

"American Libraries is the worst of all the library association magazines." 

 

Members believe that their membership dues should be paying for more tangible benefits aside from division and association publications. ALA professional development opportunities offered free of cost should be made more available to members. With the size of our profession and our helpful disposition, ALA may be able to solicit people to do workshops free of charge if ALA would just provide the technology to enable the workshops to be hosted online.

 

C. Division Membership 

"I am totally bummed that to join ACRL I have to join ALA – it means I don’t belong to either. Truthfully, I would rather belong to a smaller organization related to my area of specialty." 

 

"I wouldn’t mind joining YALSA, but ALA holds no interest to me otherwise."

 

By far, the most cited reason for continuing ALA membership is the personal networking opportunities ALA presents. Some member provided suggestions on how ALA could facilitate these personal relationships and working groups more effectively.

 

"Partnerships through ALA with other librarians allow for collaborative effort to make positive effort on libraries across the nation."

 

"I joined ALA out of grad school because it was the 'thing to do,' but I stayed in ALA because of the enthusiastic and committed people [in ALA]." 

 

"To me, the most valuable part of being active at conferences has been getting to know my colleagues from across the nation. Working with all these people has inspired me and taught me a lot about librarianship."

  1. 3.                  Involvement/Engagement

Participation in association committees and governance provides a source of both satisfaction and frustration for our respondents. The cost associated with physically attending conferences often prevents travel, which, in turn, gives people the feeling that they cannot participate. 

A. Facilitating Networking and Informal Work Groups

"Multiple networking unconference spaces w better reservation system to reserve space."

 

"Ala needs to have an organic quality to it more along the lines of the MIGs-it needs to be easier to start new discussion grps and better ways to encourage research & presentation w/in the larger org. & divisions."

 

Participation in association committees and governance provides a source of satisfaction and frustration for our respondents. 

 

B. Virtual Participation Opportunities

"I’ve never been active in committees because I can’t go to any of the meetings (they are always too far away and too expensive for me)." 

 

"My work pays for me to go and I really want to get involved in ALA committee work, but they can’t afford to send me to two ALA conferences a year." 

 

"I feel like a 2nd class member because I cannot REALLY participate. For instance, I had the good fortune to have been appointed to a position on a council as an intern, but could not accept because I was told there was no way for me to virtually participate and I could not afford to travel to both Annual and Midwinter."

 

The cost of attending conferences prevents travel, which gives people the feeling that they cannot participate. More emphasis should be placed on creating virtual committees or virtual task forces that can contribute to the association and the profession. While committees do have virtual member positions, this too tends to create a "second class membership" when much of the work happens in physical meetings at conference. ALA should consider entirely virtual committees, so that every member is on equal footing when it comes to participation.

 

C. Committee Appointments

"I've applied several times and never heard anything. Don't leave us hanging. If I don't make it on the committee of my choice, please let me know and offer alternatives. As of now, it's very hard to get involved without knowing someone on the inside." 

 

Young librarians, in particular, have found it difficult to find roles in available committees, and the perception is that you must know someone in order to be selected for membership. When not selected, no notice is given and no alternative participation avenues are offered, leaving those not selected "hanging" and disappointed. ALA should institute a deadline for committee appointments and send out an automated message to all non-selected volunteers acknowledging their willingness to contribute and offering other venues for participation, like communities on ALAConnect or Discussion Groups at annual conference.

 

D. Committee Work

"I get frustrated with committees that do nothing all year, or solicit feedback but then do nothing with it!"

 

"The work I do [on committees] seems to get lost." 

 

"It seems like a lot of the work that goes on within ALA has little impact on anything. That may just be my perception, though, since I am still fairly new to the profession and organization."

 

Unless a committee publishes an article or presents at conference, the work a committee does largely goes unnoticed, even within the sections and divisions the committee is in. ALA could provide tools for ALA units to articulate and share the work of their member committees. For example, ACRL requires each of its division-level committees report what work it has done and have that work explicitly tied to ACRL's strategic plan. This list of work could be shared with the membership of the division not only as a way to keep committees accountable, but also to make the work that they do more visible and more accessible.

 

E. Committee Structure

In addition to wanting to know how the existing committees are tied to the work of the organization in general, young librarians expressed a desire for an overall assessment of the very existence of these committees. ALA could perform a periodic (every five years) analysis of what the standing committees are charged with, if the charges are still relevant to the organization’s strategic plan, and whether the committee should be cut, changed (i.e. if its charge might be better met with a more loosely organized working group), or kept as is.

 

 

Appendix IV

Focus Area:  ALA Offices, Divisions, Roundtables, and Activities

 

Introduction

This subcommittee contacted entities within ALA to identify existing efforts within the organization. To this end, committee members acquired information from divisions, sections, offices, and additional groups within the association. Contact was made largely by email, but some phone contact was involved. The results are included as supplemental information (pp. 13-18). Responding units reporting activities of benefit to young librarians include:

  • Offices: Chapter Relations Office (CRO), Office for Diversity, Office for Human Resource Development and Recruitment (HRDR)
  • Divisions: American Association of School Librarians (AASL), Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL), Association for Library Collections and Technical Services (ALCTS), Reference & User Services Association (RUSA)
  • Other Groups: New Members Round Table (NMRT)

 

Summary of Findings

The subcommittee found that while many individual units within ALA are making important efforts to engage young librarians, the overall effect is fragmented at best. Some units either do not identify young librarians as a priority or do not know how to address the issue. Many units count on their annual sponsorship of an Emerging Leader and conference social events to build investment from young librarians. Further, units generally target "new member" and "new librarian" recruitment without emphasis on younger, first-career professionals. There are no best practices for involving young members and no coordination across the association to increase the impact of units' varied initiatives.

 

The subcommittee identified several apparently successful models for young librarian engagement that may serve as inspiration for larger incorporation across the association. Specifically, these initiatives were notable among all the units' efforts:

  • HRDR's Emerging Leaders program has been largely successful in attracting young librarians and assisting them in obtaining committee appointments and increasing their association involvement. Additionally, the program has been successful in gaining buy-in from across ALA units through sponsorship opportunities and project creation.
  • Committee Internships
  • Student to staff work
  • New member interest groups, such as the one created by ALCTS, stand out as a "stepping stone" for young librarians who may not yet have decided upon specific committee interests or whose careers are not yet defined. These groups offer both a committee appointment and the opportunity for young members to "have a voice" in the association through project and program planning, as well as involvement in unit leadership.

 

Conclusion

While the subcommittee acknowledges the important efforts taking place individually among ALA units, a more consistent and coordinated effort across the association is recommended to increase impact and assist units in recruiting and engaging young members. It is strongly recommended that as many young librarians as possible be involved at all levels of this initiative.

~Supplemental Information~

 

I. Strategy for finding out what a division/office does to retain and involve young librarians.

  • Explore Division/Office Website
  • Identify any membership or appointment committees and look at documentation from those groups
  • Contact the chair of the division asking for the right people to talk to about their efforts

 

II. ALA Offices: Responses

 

A. Chapter Relations Office (CRO)   

Even though we have programs for students, such as student-to-staff and joint student memberships, we don't have any specifically targeted to just those 35 and under. All students are eligible (http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/affiliates/chapters/student/studentchapters1.cfm).

 

It's important to ensure that young librarians are engaged in every aspect of ALA. They need to be in on discussions concerning strategic planning, programming, etc., and need to be appointed to committees, elected to Council, elected to leadership roles in round tables, etc. Every ALA door of opportunity should be accessible to young librarians. Of course, the same holds true for all librarians, however they self-describe themselves.  

 

B. Governance

According to JoAnne Kempf, Director of the Governance Office, "The ALA Governance Office does not really work directly with libraries and librarians. We facilitate the operations of the association by working with the Executive Board and Council and the president and their initiatives, so as far as having any programs that would directly relate to retaining young librarians, no we do not have any in our office. This is not something that our office would do."

 

C. Office for Diversity

Abbreviated version of email with Gwendolyn Prellwitz re: Spectrum Scholarship Program. "As administrators of such a large recruitment initiative we naturally generate programs and services targeting newer professionals. Since Spectrum does have an emphasis on recruiting for diversity we tend to target our resources more on amount of career experience than age. It does so happen that we are seeing our Spectrum cohorts skewing younger in recent years. We hold a dialogue during the Spectrum Leadership Institute about race/gender/age dynamics. Additionally, managing generations in the workplace and harnessing the power of young professionals are areas that we may develop training on in the very near future. We're also hoping to receive a grant this summer that will help us target our recruitment efforts more specifically at high school and undergraduate students. We're also planning to expand our offerings in the area of publicly available trainings since some of what we provide Spectrum Scholars is considered part of their unique benefit and we keep it a little under wraps. We also hope to do some work through that grant to identify recruitment messages that resonate with a younger audience."

 

D. Office for Human Resource Development and Recruitment (HRDR)

From a conversation with Lorelle Swader, HRDR Director:

  • HRDR itself focuses on serving incoming professionals.
  • Scholarship programs help encourage people to be lifelong members and leaders.
  • Placement Center helps those who are new to the profession get their first job.
  • Emerging Leaders program (see below) .
  • Internships: HRDR has taken over coordinating internships to ALA and Council-level committees, working with the TOLD committee (training, orientation and leadership development).
  • General recruitment to the profession.
  • Outreach to library school students, providing an introduction to ALA and the profession.
  • The ALA liaison to NMRT is part of HRDR.
  • Emerging Leaders. According to Peter Bromberg, member/facilitator of the Emerging Leaders (EL) program subcommittee, survey data shows that ELs are more satisfied with the program every year, but satisfaction rates are still low at 72%. The subcommittee is contacting both mentors and groups to make sure that communication is happening between all parties, which were a major complaint in previous years. New this year: creation of the EL Interest Group on ALA Connect: all ELs are included automatically. The ELIG steering committee has control over a two-hour program slot at Annual, which gives them visibility and a way for ELs to remain active after their participation in the one-year Emerging Leaders program.

 

E. Office for Research & Statistics (ORS)

There is an ongoing Member Demographics Study posted on the ALA website (http://www.ala.org/ala/research/initiatives/membershipsurveys/index.cfm). Summary of findings (retrieved June 11, 2010):

 

Beginning in May 2005, ALA invited members to participate in a brief demographic survey. As of May 27, 2010, 54,135 members have participated. A review of the responses indicates greater stability in the distributions of responses of age by decade and steady increase in youngest members responding to the questions. Three-quarters our current membership has participated in this voluntary, self-selected survey.

 

Baby boomers – born between 1946 and 1964 – represent 46.2 percent of the ALA membership responding as of the May 2010 analysis of the ALA Member Demographic Survey. Members already at retirement age (over age 65 and born in years up to 1945) represent 6.4 percent (3,343) of those who provided a date of birth in their response. If we estimate retirement age beginning at age 62, then about 13.4 percent of members reporting their date of birth fall into that range (approximately 7,010).

 

Membership remains largely unchanged since ALA began collecting these characteristics. Not dissimilar from the library profession overall, ALA members are:

  • Predominantly female (80.3% female to 18.8% male)
  • Predominantly white (86.3%), and
  • Hold an MLS or other Master’s degrees (63.4% and 25.7%, respectively).

  

III. ALA Divisions: Responses

 

A. American Association of School Librarians (AASL)   

You are correct in that AASL sponsors two Emerging Leaders and endeavors to get all ELs who are school librarians involved in some way. We have an Appointments Committee that looks for all types of diversity. One of our staff members, a student herself, is in the process of setting up a community for students. We also give the following award annually: Frances Henne Award: Established in 1986, the $1,250 award recognizes a school librarian with five years or less experience who demonstrates leadership qualities with students, teachers and administrators, to attend an AASL conference or ALA Annual Conference for the first time. Applicants must be AASL personal members. Like ELs, this does not guarantee that the recipients are "young" — only new to the profession.

 

From my observation, "young" librarians are embraced by the division leadership (no strong tradition of "serving your time" in AASL), so I believe they are equally attracted to all initiatives. Often, an "older" chair will mentor a "younger," newer member into a project.  

You did not ask about challenges, but I will answer anyway. School librarians as a whole seem to be an older demographic as they more often than not come to school librarianship from a teaching career. A number of states have the teaching requirement as a prerequisite for certification. Also, when we do identify "young in age" school librarians, we often find that family responsibilities (e.g. young children) limit their already limited time. 

 

B. Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL)

 

i) ACRL overall initiatives:

  • Top 10 Ways to Get Involved in ACRL (http://www.acrl.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/about/membership/involved.cfm)
  • “ACRL Involvement Ideas” (publication)
  • ACRL OnPoint Chat: November 12, 2009: Getting Involved With ACRL. In this discussion, ACRL Vice-President Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe and Executive Director Mary Ellen Davis answer questions about the wide variety of ways to make the most of your membership by getting involved in ACRL. Learn how and when committee appointments are made along with other ways you can become more active in the ACRL community and contribute to the profession.
  • ACRL members can create Interest Groups within ACRL for areas of current interest that are not otherwise well represented. Interest Groups are designed to provide a more dynamic system for members to form groups around important emerging issues in the profession and to increase opportunities for involvement within our organization. Interest Groups are intended to be very fluid, and can be formed easily and disband quickly in response to environmental changes. For more information, see the "Interest Group FAQ" (http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/resources/tipsheets/ig_faq08.pdf).
  • The ACRL Residency Interest Group has launched a new podcast series called the "Newbie Dispatches."  It is a set of podcasts on a variety of topics of interest to current library school students, recent graduates, early career librarians, and former and current library residents. The first podcast is on publishing a manuscript for the first time, writing a manuscript prospectus, and getting into the world of academic publishing (http://acrl.ala.org/residency/?cat=273).

 

ii) College Libraries Section (CLS)

According to Irene Herold, Vice Chair, College Libraries Section, CLS sponsored Friday Night Feast dinners at the last ACRL conference (with a really inexpensive dinner, and a free dinner for any new CLS members). Our support of an Emerging Leader is something else, too. Plus the Research Coach, while not specifically targeted toward the identified population, might by default include a larger portion of that group who are still working on their first publications, whether for tenure or professional growth.

 

iii) Rare Books and Manuscripts Section (RBMS) 

The following initiatives of the section have been popular with new and younger members:

  • Scholarship Committee (http://rbms.info/committees/scholarships/index.shtml).
  • The Buddy Program, sponsored by the Membership and Professional Development Committee, provides first time conference attendees with an experienced RBMS member to guide the newcomer through their conference experience (http://rbms.info/committees/membership_and_professional/buddy_program/index.shtml).
  • The Mentoring Program, sponsored by the Membership and Professional Development Committee, is designed to facilitate communication between RBMS members and to support their professional development as special collections librarians, curators, and archivists. It is open to all members of RBMS, old or new, who need help in becoming more involved with RBMS and in navigating the rare books and manuscripts profession (http://rbms.info/committees/membership_and_professional/mentoring_program/index.shtml).
  • The Membership and Professional Development Committee of the Rare Books and Manuscripts Section (RBMS) of the Association of College and Research Libraries, American Library Association (ALA), has developed “Educational Opportunities: A Directory” to aid both prospective and current members of the profession in navigating various educational opportunities for special collections librarianship. Currently, the directory lists graduate coursework offered within degree programs leading to a graduate library degree (MLS) (http://rbms.info/committees/membership_and_professional/educational_opportunities/index.shtml).
  • At the annual RBMS Preconference, we do an Orientation to RBMS Program prior to the opening reception and hold a new members social (dutch-treat dinner)
  • The newest project of the M&PD Committee is a (hopefully) soon-to-be-launched FAQ for librarians and archivists new to the profession.
  • The RBMS Diversity Committee (http://rbms.info/committees/diversity/index.shtml) has an active outreach program. They have developed a toolkit for introducing special collections librarianship to high-school, undergraduate, graduate, and paraprofessionals. The Diversity Committee is co-chaired by Veronica Reyes-Escudero and Athena Jackson.

 

iv) University Libraries Section (ULS)  

  • Conference socials.
  • Creation of new committees on engaging current issues has brought in some new/young members.
  • Sponsored an EL, which led to her being appointed to multiple ULS committees.

 

C. Association for Library Collections and Technical Services (ALCTS)

  • Includes Interns on committees within the division.
  • Any person who fills out volunteer form gets some sort of appointment.
  • There are virtual committee memberships.
  • The new Public Library Tech services IG seems to have attracted a lot of people.
  • According to Deborah A. Ryszka, Chair of the ALCTS Membership Committee:
    • ALCTS 101: Targeted to newer members. After ALCTS 101, ALCTS hopes to host a happy hour or social.
    • Will be partnering with NMRT to do outreach to students and student chapters
    • There are virtual members
    • Working on messaging scenarios to welcome people to the division, to celebrate anniversaries in the division (5, 10 years, etc), as well as did you forget to renew messages.
    • Hoping to do a retention study for those who do drop membership. Try to re-engage these people with possibilities including lower division fees for a while, lower pre-conference costs, or, for those who want, appointment to a committee.
    • Recommendations: get people involved and they will stay; reduce conference and membership rates; mentoring; networking opportunities for younger people, create a buddy system for conference that pairs a new attendee with a veteran attendee so they can have a dialog before and during conference (might partner with NMRT)
  • ALCTS New Member Interest Group
    • Hosting an "ALCTS, What's in it for me?" program at Annual.
    • ALCTS 101 at Annual: presents sections and provides networking opportunity.
    • Hosting forums (online, asynchronous discussions) on topics related to the group. Noticed in these that people would really like more affordable regional events.
    • A call for bloggers and volunteers is on their Connect space.
    • The IG was created for new members to have a voice. To this end, the structure includes "community coordinators" as that voice.
    • ALCTS is a diverse and talented community. The goal is to set up a structure around this community.

 

D. Library and Information Technology Association (LITA)

BIGWIG stands for the Blogs, Interactive Groupware Wikis Interest Group, but since its founding in 2005 BIGWIG has been the "Social Software" IG of LITA. Unlike most Interest Groups, BIGWIG is active throughout the year. It is responsible for maintaining the LITABlog and LITA Wiki, and it has taken on several other projects since its inception, including conference blogging and podcasting, as well as podcasts of interviews with candidates for LITA offices.

 

E. Reference & User Services Association (RUSA)

  • Had an Emerging Leaders Task Force and is funding Emerging Leader participants.
  • RUSA is experimenting with virtual conference attendance.
  • There is a Spectrum Scholars initiative.
  • "Five Things A New Librarian Should Know About" is a RUSA Presidential initiative to have each committee post a web page with five key pieces of information that each new librarian should know about the committee.

 

F. Library Leadership and Management Association (LLAMA)

IV. Other Groups working towards this goal within ALA: Responses

 

NMRT

  • Numerous online discussion opportunities through its email discussion list.
  • Hosts conference orientations in which speakers discuss how to make the most of the conference experience.
  • NMRT’s current councilor is proactive in disseminating information to members about how council works.
  • There are guaranteed committee appointments.
  • There is virtual participation. 
  • NMRT sponsors an Emerging Leader.
More...

Discussion Midwinter interim report 2011

by Kim Leeder on Sat, Mar 26, 2011 at 10:05 am

If you haven't seen it, the Task Force's interim report to the ALA Executive Board is available in the TF community space.

Discussion Midwinter update and feedback opportunity

by Kim Leeder on Sun, Jan 9, 2011 at 06:53 pm

The Task Force submitted an interim report to the ALA Executive Board at Midwinter 2011.

Check it out here: Young Librarians Task Force MW2011 report

Talk back! Vote for what issues you think are most important for ALA to focus on here: younglibrarians.uservoice.com

Online Doc Subcommittee 2: Compiling Responses

by Eric Frierson on Tue, May 18, 2010 at 01:47 pm

from the text-a-thon:

 

More online training opportunities

I would like to get help and support with research and writing

Fewer panel presentations @ conference. More posters workshops and interaction.
encourage more active learning oriented conference programming and less "show and tell"
Multiple networking unconference spaces w better reservation system to reserve space.

from the text-a-thon:

 

More online training opportunities

I would like to get help and support with research and writing

Fewer panel presentations @ conference. More posters workshops and interaction.
encourage more active learning oriented conference programming and less "show and tell"
Multiple networking unconference spaces w better reservation system to reserve space.

Smaller cheaper conferences
I would love to see more opportunities for virtual or distance participation. It would particularly help those of us in smaller or rural libraries.

Make it easier to volunteer for committees. I've applied several times and never heard anything. Don't leave us hanging. If I don't make it on the committee of my choice, please let me know and offer alternatives. As of now, it's very hard to get involved without knowing someone on the inside.
Ala needs to have an oganic quality to it more along the lines of the MIGs-it needs to be easier to start new dicussion grps and better ways to encourage research & presentation w/in the larger org. & divisions.

Cheap membership dues and conference registration fees for the unemployed
Best way to make ALA better for young librarians: more affordable membership fees!
Make ALA events more affordable. Happy to pay, but is prohibitively expensive. Extend  financial assistance to ...|
Foreign-born lib professionals who can serve the growing international population in communities
more partnership with regional library associations for joint membership pricing
more options re: tiered membership pricing

Make rbms separate from acrl...not all rare special collections are in academic institutions

Work on building bridges to relevant non library communities...ie it-web development, design, artistic

Abolish all acronyms! Srsly I can't understand my professional org b/c I have to wade through so many.

Make the website work, at all. It's an embarrassment. Bad graphic & info design, way too tied to-org-chart. Worst fail: consistently broken INTERNAL links!

Ala has to add an annual award for writers of picture book texts. It is the only overlooked/ignored category.

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FROM BLOG:

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More for the money for those of us who cannot attend the conferences. American Libraries is the worst of all the library association magazines (based on the year I joined practically everything while I could get student rates). My library would probably still pay for me to be a member, but I couldn’t justify it – not even to join ACRL – I just felt like it was them throwing money out the window (especially since our library recieves American Libraries as well as the ACRL publications – I can read those copies if I wish). (I have recently joined the Academic section of SLA – not only was it cheaper, but “Information Outlook” was always the best of the library association magazines)

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ALA is pretty much irrelevant to me because I cannot afford to attend conferences nor expensive pre-conferences. I feel like a 2nd class member because I cannot REALLY participate. For instance, I had the good fortune to have been appointed to a position on a council as an intern, but could not accept because I was told there was no way for me to virtually participate and I could not afford to travel to both Annual and Midwinter.

My student membership is almost up–and I do not think I will be continuing because it is so expensive and the benefits to me are almost nil. Like I said–I feel like a 2nd class member whose voice won’t get heard, or really taken seriously because I cannot afford to travel to the conferences.

I think virtual participation is great, but I also think it should not be so expensive. I can’t remember what the price was for the last virtual conference, but it was prohibitively expensive for me.

I really like connect and think that this is the direction ALA should be heading. I actually think ALA can learn much from Web Junction. Providing an infrastructure for communication was the beginning, now ALA needs to add content, classes, webinars, and more for free (to members). That would be a draw. I see many librarians out there building their careers, but do not see much collaboration on how we can better our profession and make information available for people who need it.

LITA–I’ve been in LITA for two years now and do not find it worthwhile.

The SRRT is alright–unless you are RADICAL and criticize Israel–then you are labeled an anti-semite.

:-(

I’m considering putting my efforts in with the Progressive Librarians Guild.

I do not say these things lightly–I have been trying to get involved with ALA for two years and have had little success because of financial reasons–now tell me how a Librarian Organization prohibit members who cannot afford to travel to REALLY participate.

So, I think decreasing the cost of membership, decreasing the cost of conference attendance–virtual and in reality, provide FREE classes and certificates of competency in training to members.

Create a local chapter network that holds mini-conferences, creates videos and will have a speakers bureau. This will help members get more involved and enable them to participate.

Maybe have a regional ALA meeting during annual and midwinter that teleconferences with the conferences–letting members participate a low cost. You could even have town hall like meetings with regions participating in interviewing presidential candidates, participating in committee, and also just networking. By having the librarians at a mini-conference, the teleconference could be provided at a lowered cost to all participants–instead of each one paying separately–I bet ALA could swing something like this.

Ha–we do have regional chapters–I had no idea OLA was our chapter! ALA needs to do a better job conveying structure to members.

Oregon Library Association

I think I could just join OLA–why should I join ALA too?

So, I find it interesting that I am a member of both OLA and ALA and had no idea that OLA was the local chapter. I thought it was independent. I should have investigated that further. I will pursue this avenue.

Anyway, I wanted to convey my frustration at the economic barrier of participation in ALA and, in my point of view detrimental effect of this on the diversity of voices who are heard and who can FULLY participate. I appreciate your work, the work of ALA and most of all the people involved in this great organization. I just feel that it should really give some serious thought to the costs of participation. I mean–is ALA shooting itself in the foot by not bringing in more voices in times when innovation is so sought after? I think so. I know I could have contributed much more if I had more money.

Thank you for your work and efforts my friends!

Max Macias

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I’ve just started becoming involved with ALA and it’s challenging in a lot of ways. I am fortunate in that I do get conference funding, so I can attend Midwinter and Annual, but that means that I don’t get to attend other conferences that are more focused and obviously useful (for me, that would be Charleston, ACRL, LOEX, and discipline-specific conferences). I do have to pay for ALA membership out of my own pocket and that is hard, since I’m a new professional, live in a high cost-of-living area, and have student loan payments to make every month.

I’m still not quite sure how to become more involved with ALA and I’m actually on a couple of committees. I totally missed the deadline for volunteering last year and I try to keep track of that….I don’t think ALA communication is clear much of the time and there are *way* too many channels for it. I’ve mostly tried to get involved because I want to learn more about the profession and so on, but it often seems like not a lot happens as a result of being involved. I don’t know if that’s clear – it seems like a lot of the work that goes on within ALA has little impact on anything. That may just be my perception, though, since I am still fairly new to the profession and organization. Overall, it feels like it’s hard to have a voice, even though I am able to participate in some of the conferences….I don’t know what I could or should be doing at them.

As for regional activities, my local chapter is not terribly active and we don’t have a local conference.

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Fortunately or Unfortunately,

My employer focus on corporate libraries so my focus is on SLA. I am currently highly active in the local chapter and national association so my time is limited. As I am working more and more with ProQuest as AN embed, I can imagen there could be change back to ALA at some point. However, until then I will continue to focus and network primarily through SLA.

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I was an ALA member (briefly) as a benefit of a scholarship I received. The amount of mail and communication was exhausting – why oh why is there no consideration for the amount of trash produced by the organization? I do not ever want to receive mailings about things I care nothing about – my goal in life is to have little to no physical mail. If there was an electronic membership option (and my name was not on a million mailing lists and everything was in an electronic format) I might reconsider. I am totally bummed that to join ACRL I have to join ALA – it means I don’t belong to either. Truthfully, I would rather belong to a smaller organization related to my area of specialty. I think I’m one of the few librarians in my organization who is not an ALA member – but I don’t feel like I’m missing out on much.

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The ALA membership drop out rate for young professionals is no mystery. Between 2003-2006, about 25,500 MLS were awarded in the US…that’s just three years. (http://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d08/tables/dt08_272.asp).
After getting that degress, most of graduates aren’t able to get jobs as librarians…so why continue to be members of a professional organization? There are simply not enough jobs to warrant the enrollment levels in MLS programs. Of course, people argue that older librarians -especially in academic positions-are going to retire and vacate positions-I see no evidence of this happening. The tenured librarian remains in his/her position proving everyday that no replacement will be necessary when the day comes to leave. In public libraries across the country older librarians are being encourged to accept retirement to save $…those positions will not be filled.

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I completely agree with Miss Fifi that it’s a bummer you have to belong to ALA in order to join ACRL. Now I too belong to neither after 5 years of continued membership. And I also don’t believe I’m missing out on much.

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I’ve been a member of ALA for two years. The first year the membership was free thanks to a scholarship. My library school offered dual membership to TLA and ALA for one price, so I was able to be a member of both organizations while in library school for the price of one. I finished library school in 2008, so I no longer qualify for the student membership rates. I wanted to attend ALA annual this past summer, so I renewed my membership to get the discounted rate to attend ALA. So, I think the reasons I *do* ALA is because of opportunities — the opportunity to be a member for free via the scholarship I received, and the opportunity to get a discounted rate to the annual conference. If I had not planned on attending the annual conference, I probably wouldn’t have renewed my membership. Aside from having attended the conference in Chicago over the summer, I haven’t participated in ALA this year.

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I was a member of ALA and ACRL as an early career librarian, but have since allowed my membership to lapse. I did not find that the cost of membership was worth the value I was getting out of the organization or the meetings, particularly considering that librarian salaries have been pretty stagnant lately. As a youngish professional with family obligations, I do have to make the choice between paying the cost of membership and paying for other living costs. I also wish that I could belong to ACRL without having to pay ALA dues. In the meantime, I have found smaller, more narrowly focused organizations that are more relevant to my career interests.

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The best thing about ALA is that the American Libraries Direct email keeps me up to date on news about libraries big and small across the country. The thing I dislike the most is that ALA claims to speak for me on political issues, most recently on health care. I also dislike that most of my family and some library customers dislike ALA because most of ALA’s attention seeking behavior in recent history has been about fighting internet filtering and promoting “banned books.”

I will probably continue my ALA membership after getting my MLIS if I am employed in a public library.

Re: Kim’s question to Jamal about SLA– I joined SLA this year and I find the SLA website, webinars, and conferences are more focused on professional knowledge and skills. Less politics, less “Aren’t we great.”

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I have been an ALA member for 19 years. I joined when I was at library school at Indiana University at the encouragement of several faculty. Even though I am a Clinical Medical Librarian working in a Hospital I have retained my basic ALA membership because it is the representation of our profession. While the Special Libraries Association and the Medical Library Association are great their focus is not on all libraries and all ages. ALA does this. I have been a member of several different divisions of ALA but when money got tight I had to cut them. I just recently cut something out of my household budget to rejoin ACRL because they have a new Health Sciences group. I’ve never been active in committees because I can’t go to any of the meetings (they are always too far away and too expensive for me) and I’m very active in MLA which takes a lot of my time. Overall I like to read about the challenges facing our profession and exciting things we are doing in our ever changing profession. I want to have my hand on the pulse of our profession and ALA allows me to do that. Otherwise how would I be responding here if I hadn’t received my ALA Direct. That alone is worth the price of my ALA membership.

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I agree with Amy Taylor’s comment above: “The thing I dislike the most is that ALA claims to speak for me on political issues.” ALA needs to recognize the political diversity among its membership.

However, I am in general an enthusiastic participant in ALA, ALSC, and YALSA — I attend Annual and Midwinter whenever possible, hope to be active on committees in the future, etc. I joined ALA as a MLIS student a few years ago, taking advantage of the student rate. Now that I am employed in a public library, my employer pays for my membership, but I would probably maintain it even if I had to pay it out of pocket. I do like the AL direct newsletter, the conferences, and the continuing ed opportunities.

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I don’t participate in ALA because I am an active member of the Medical Library Association — at the national and regional level. Participating and attending the two annual meetings keeps me pretty busy. In regards to professional development, I feel this organization best serves that need.

----

I graduated with an MLIS in 2005 and have been a public librarian since 2003. I’m not a member of ALA because I feel like I don’t have much to gain for the amount of money it would cost. I’m quoting someone else here, can’t remember who, but they said that you when you get frustrated with ALA, you have to remember it’s the American LIBRARY Association, not the American LIBRARIANS’ Association. They seem to work on a beaurocratic level that has not much to do with my professional life at a small public library. I’m on board with the previous poster who said they would like the option of just supporting their section of ALA. I wouldn’t mind joining YALSA, but ALA holds no interest to me otherwise.

----

I’m not a member of ALA nor do I have enough money to post buy a camera to record a video to post. I also don’t have the extra $200 laying around to become a memeber. I was a member as a student, but I don’t feel that giving money to the organization brings me back anything. I am a member of my state library organization and very active in that role.

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I have attended 3 annual conferences and do not have plans to attend this summer. I find the meetings offered at ALA to be hit or miss and usually do not have too much to take away for the time and cost of attending. I am interested in joining ACRL but I am also frustrated by the fact it is another membership fee on top of the ALA membership fee.

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I am no longer a young librarian. I’m definitely a middle-aged librarian. But I identify with some of what I’ve read in these comments. I first belonged to ALA when I was in library school. I remember being overwhelmed by the mailings, and didn’t connect with a whole heck of a lot in “American Libraries”. I let my membership lapse, and in the early years got very involved with my local and state library organizations. I was generously mentored by folks at the Western Massachusetts Regional Library System, who invited me on committees and generally helped me get grounded in the profession. After 6 years in a small public library (which did not have a whole heck of a lot of money for professional development) I got a job at a prep school, where there were funds for an ALA membership AND to send me to conferences.

Generationaly, I’m cusper, right between the boomers and the Gen xers. This certianly colors my following comments. I really like being involved in ALA for two main reasons. #1) It’s our national library association – and supports our fighting the good fight. #2) connections with librarians of all ages in all types of libraries all over this country and around the world. But, my involvement has been contingent on institutional funding for my participation (as a member and on committees etc.)

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I am a relatively active member of ALA. I became involved because I was awarded a Spectrum Scholarship and was given the opportunity to attend a wonderful leadership institute as part of the award. At the institute, I met Loriene Roy who encouraged me to become active in the American Indian Library Association (you do not have to be a member of ALA to join and it’s only $15). Over the years, I have served on various ALA committees, at first because it was a promotion and tenure requirement at my previous position. Every year, I struggle with whether or not to renew all of my memberships (ALA, ACRL, RUSA, & various roundtables). But every year I decide that it is worth it. Here are the reasons that I do ALA:

- ALA has given me so many opportunities and $$ over the years. I’ve added it up and I’ve gotten more the $10,000 in scholarships and travel grants. In November, I am going to Guadalajara for the second time through the FIL Free Pass program . So I can’t really complain about $200

- I support ALA’s advocacy efforts. I think that the Washington Office does a great job of representing our profession, especially on issues of intellectual freedom.

- I actually enjoy ALA conferences. Although I think we should probably move to just one conference a year, I really enjoy my time at both conferences. I agree that the programs can be hit or miss, but I always get something from the vast exhibits. To me, the most valuable part of being active at conferences has been getting to know my colleagues from across the nation. Working with all these people has inspired me and taught me a lot about librarianship. And of course I always have a great time in any city when hoards of librarians invade.

- I view reading the professional literature as a bonus to all the other perks of membership, but I have to agree that I do get too much stuff from all the associations

Earlier this year, I was asked to run for ALA Council. I was VERY reluctant and actually took several months to decide. In the end, I decided to go ahead and do it because my involvement in ALA has been so beneficial.

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I am a member of ALA, and I have been to two annual conferences. The cost – as the comments above have stated – is a growing concern. When I was a student it was great (and cheap), and I could afford to be a member of as many things that interested me, but now I have to make cuts and that’s particularly hard because I don’t think I’m really at a place in my career where I can definitively say what kind of librarian I am and a member of what sole sub-organization I should be. Also, the annual conference is really enjoyable, so far I have found the programs to be very informative – but it’s overwhelming and really expensive. My work pays for me to go and I really want to get involved in ALA committee work, but they can’t afford to send me to two ALA conferences a year. I really want to go to a Midwinter conference, just to see what its like, but between airfare, hotel, and conference cost there is no way I can foot the bill myself.

One of the hard things about participating in ALA for me is that I do it mostly for me, and my work is very supportive because they want to see me grow professionally. But I am torn, because I know that ALA (in conferences, committees, and as an organization) has little to offer the organization that I work for. I work for a hybrid museum, archive, and library – but at some point I might have to make a choice between what I want for me and what is for the good of the organization. Currently I draw from what I can in people’s presentations and papers, and use it creatively in our environment, but I know most people in our community don’t even bother with ALA because it doesn’t seem like ALA makes much effort to reach out to them either.

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FROM YOUTUBE

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Joined at student ALA - only interaction through magazine, which didn't have a lot of value for him.  Left ALA and the profession.  Re-joined because of reader privacy and freedom to read advocacy efforts.  Supports with dues and participation.  Doesn't get organization - feels lost - but thinks he'll get used to its structure eventually.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jLlnzGF3nZU

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1. No
2. Why? Because my place of employ has no funds for professional activities. I used to be a member of C'YAAL two years back (before the economy tanked), and I served on a task force and had the time of my life. Currently, I'm just trying to aviod being laid off with libraries closing and layoffs going on around me.

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Member to make a different. Partnerships allow for positive collaborative efforts.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfuMyUJ5PPI

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ALA for people - joined because 'that's what you do', but has loved enthusiastic people to help work through tough issues; opportunities to participate in ACRL and ITLwaLP - but disatisfied with committees that do nothing, or solicit feedback but don't use it:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xUl3m11a2iE&feature=related

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Kim Leeder - the people - inspiring people.  Contribute on a larger scale.  Downside: cost - and 2 conferences is expensive - and work I do seems to get lost.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4PxihoIUkRM&feature=related

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Emily Ford - ALA can represent and get things done on a governmental level.  While it doesn't work all the time, participation is a way to change it so it is more responsive.    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ac_Fxy4bsU8&feature=related

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Xima Avalos - People are amazing.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TcKlZc9KBvM&feature=related

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More...

Online Doc Sub-Committee 1: Report & Recommendations

by Brett Bonfield on Mon, May 17, 2010 at 04:29 pm

Subcommittee Charge: Investigate what affiliates and other professional associations are doing to integrate young professionals into the profession and association.

Subcommittee Charge: Investigate what affiliates and other professional associations are doing to integrate young professionals into the profession and association.

Introduction: This subcommittee employed positive deviance methodology
(http://www.positivedeviance.org/). That is, we hoped to identify associations that deviate in a positive way from the norm because they are exceptionally good at achieving a specific result. In this instance, the result we hoped to identify was an exceptional ability to retain members aged thirty-five and under.

The subcommittee contacted approximately sixty of ALA's peer associations, asking four simple questions in order to identify positive deviants:

  1.  How many members do you have?
  2.  What percentage are under 35?
  3.  What is your overall retention rate?
  4.  What is your retention rate for people under 35?

Summary of Findings: About twenty organizations responded. The associations ranged in size from 300 to almost 350,000. The percentage of members under age 35 ranged from 8% to 32% (though the latter percentage, something of an outlier, was based on a survey that included only 60% of the association's membership). Overall retention rates ranged from 65-70% to 98%. No association we contacted, including ALA, tracked retention based on its members' age.

Recommendations: In order to make sustainable, ongoing changes, an organization needs to set goals for itself and measure its results. We recommend that ALA:

  1. Immediately begin tracking its retention rate for its members aged 35 and under;
  2. Set annual goals for improving that retention rate;
  3. Post the Association goal(s) related to young professionals' retention rate and any activities related to retention on the ALA website;
  4. Include ALA's young professional retention rate and related activities as part of the ALA Executive Director's report at ALA's membership and Council meetings each year at ALA Annual.

Conclusion: Our research method, positive deviance, is quick and inexpensive, which is why we adopted it, but it works best when there are positive outliers, and those positive outliers are willing to share their methods with the rest of the cohort. In this instance--associations measuring their ability to recruit and retain younger members and publicizing their results--there appears to be a void. Therefore, ALA can become the de facto (and default) leader in the conversation by publicly sharing its methods, its goals, and its results. As peer associations join the conversation, they can compare the relative merits of their efforts, refine their techniques, and create organizations that are more welcoming to professionals in many fields, including librarianship.

More...

Discussion Brainstorming (orientation guide, YLWG committee as case study)

by Kim Leeder on Fri, Apr 16, 2010 at 01:16 pm

I was just thinking about whether it would be worthwhile to recommend or create an orientation guide for ALA that would be distributed (electronically, probably) to all newbie librarians/members. What advice would we give them, what resources would we point them to? Could it include a flow chart of "if you're interested in x, go here," etc.? Just brainstorming.

I was just thinking about whether it would be worthwhile to recommend or create an orientation guide for ALA that would be distributed (electronically, probably) to all newbie librarians/members. What advice would we give them, what resources would we point them to? Could it include a flow chart of "if you're interested in x, go here," etc.? Just brainstorming.

I also suggested in our last chat meeting that we consider treating our committee as a case study in terms of many of the obstacles that deter young librarians from participating fully. We could present lessons learned and suggestions for avoiding such pitfalls in other committees.

More...

Online Doc ALA Wide Efforts to Engage Young Professionals--a compiling document

by Emily Ford on Thu, Apr 29, 2010 at 05:26 pm

This document is a working document of Subcommittee 4, which is looking at what is happening within ALA at activating younger/new professionals. 

I. Strategy for finding out what a division/office does to retain and involve young librarians.

a.Explore Division/Office Website

b. Identify if there are membership or appointment committees and look at documentation from those groups

This document is a working document of Subcommittee 4, which is looking at what is happening within ALA at activating younger/new professionals. 

I. Strategy for finding out what a division/office does to retain and involve young librarians.

a.Explore Division/Office Website

b. Identify if there are membership or appointment committees and look at documentation from those groups

c. Contact the chair of the division asking for the right people to talk to about this (maybe we could make a boiler-plate e-mail for chairs?)

d. What role does the Caucuses play in involving and retaining young librarians?

e. Another Strategy here

II. Offices

A synthesis on what Offices are doing, then reports on individual offices below:

a. Chapter Relations Office (CRO) - Katherine  

Katherine,

 

 


Thanks for writing!

* Are there any initiatives in your office whose purpose is to meet the needs of young librarians?

* Are there any initiatives in your office that tend to attract the participation of young librarians?

Even though we have programs for students, such as student-to-staff and joint student memberships (see both under http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/affiliates/chapters/student/studentchapters...), we don't have any specifically targeted to just those 35 and under.  All students are eligible. Would you like us to ask these questions of the Chapters and Student Chapters?  Some of them may have programs directed to this age range.

* Does your office have any advice on retaining young librarians?

It's important to ensure that young librarians are engaged in every aspect of ALA.  They need to be in on discussions concerning strategic planning, programming, etc., and need to be appointed to committees, elected to Council, elected to leadership roles in round tables, etc.  Every ALA door of opportunity should be accessible to young librarians.  Of course, the same holds true for all librarians, however they self-describe themselves.

 

 

b. Conference Services - Katherine - no response

c. Development

d. Governance - Laurel

According to JoAnne Kempf, director of the Governance Office, "The ALA Governance Office does not really work directly with libraries and librarians.  We facilitate the operations of the association by working with the Executive Board and Council and the president and their initiatives, so as far as having any programs that would directly relate to retaining young librarians, no we do not have any in our office. This is not something that our office would do."

e. Human Resources

f. Information Technology & Telecommunication Services

g. International Relations Office (IRO)

h. Finance and Accounting

i. Library

j. Member & Customer Service

k. Membership - Laurel (email sent)

l. Office for Accreditation

m. Office for Diversity - Laurel

Abbreviated version of email with Gwendolyn Prellwitz re: Spectrum Scholarship Program.  "As administrators of such a large recruitment initiative we naturally generate programs and services targeting *newer*professionals.  Since Spectrum does have an emphasis on recruiting for diversity we tend to target our resources more on amount of career experience than age.  It does so happen that we are seeing our Spectrum cohorts skewing younger in recent years.  We hold a dialogue during the Spectrum Leadership Institute about race/gender/age dynamics.  Additionally, managing generations in the workplace and harnessing the power of young professionals are areas that we may develop training on in the very near future.  We're also hoping to receive a grant this summer that will help us target our recruitment efforts more specifically at high school and undergraduate students. We're also planning to expand our offerings in the area of publically available trainings since some of what we provide Spectrum Scholars is considered part of their unique benefit and we keep it a little under wraps.  We also hope to do some work through that grant to identify recruitment messages that resonate with a younger audience."

n. Office for Human Resource Development and Recruitment (HRDR) - Laurel (spoke with Lorelle Swader) 

  • HRDR itself focuses on serving incoming professionals.
  • Scholarship programs help encourage people to be lifelong members and leaders.
  • Placement Center helps those who are new to the profession get their first job.
  • Emerging Leaders program (see below)
  • Internships: HRDR has taken over coordinating internships to ALA and Council-level committees, working with the TOLD committee (training, orientation and leadership development).
  • General recruitment to the profession.
  • Outreach to library school students, providing an intro to ALA and the profession.
  • The ALA liaison to NMRT is part of HRDR.
  • Emerging Leaders  Spoke with Peter Bromberg, member/facilitator of the EL program subcommittee. Survey data shows that ELs are more satisfied with the program every year, but satisfication rates are still low at 72%.  The subcommittee is contacting both mentors and groups to make sure that communication is happening between all parties, which was a major complaint in previous years.  New this year: creation of the EL Interest Group, which is a Connect group where ELs are automatically joined.  The ELIG steering committee has control over 2 hour program slot at Annual, which gives them visibility and things for ELs to do beyond the one year program.

o. Office for Information Technology Policy (OITP) - Emily (e-mail sent, no response yet)

 

  • I suspect that there isn't much. They are busy with lobbying, etc.

 

p. Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF)

q. Office for Library Advocacy (OLA) - Katherine - no response

r. Office for Literacy & Outreach (OLOS) - Eric

s. Office for Research & Statistics (ORS) - Emily (e-mail sent, no response)

t. Office of Government Relations (OGR) - Emily (E-mail sent, same thing as WO, actually. No response yet)

 

  • I suspect that there isn't much. They are busy with lobbying, etc.

 

u. Public Programs Office (PPO)

v. Public Information Office

w. Publishing - Kelvin

x. Staff Support Services - Kelvin

y. Washington Office - Emily (e-mail sent, no response yet)

 

  • I suspect that there isn't much. They are busy with lobbying, etc.

 

III. Divisions

A synthesis on what Divisions are doing, then reports on individual divisions below:

a. American Association of School Librarians (AASL) - Katherine  

Nancy and Julie,

Do you have any information related to the questions that Katherine is asking below? Off of the top of my head, I couldn't think of anything, besides AASL's sponsorship of Emerging Leaders (which is not completely age-restricted-35 and under OR less than 5 years in the profession, correct?)

Thanks, Ann

 

 


==== 

Ann,

You are correct in that AASL sponsors two Emerging Leaders and endeavors to get all EL's who are school librarians involved in some way.  We have an Appointments Committee that looks for all types of diversity.  One of our staff members, a student herself, is in the process of setting up a community for students.  We also give the following award annually:

  ances Henne Award:  Established in 1986, the $1,250 award recognizes a school librarian with five years or less experience who demonstrates leadership qualities with students, teachers and administrators, to attend an AASL conference or ALA Annual Conference for the first time.


Applicants must be AASL personal members.  Like EL's, this does not guarantee that the recipients are "young" --- only new to the profession.

om my observation, "young" librarians are embraced by the division leadership (no strong tradition of "serving your time"in AASL), so I believe they are equally attracted to all initiatives.  Often, an "older" chair will mentor a "younger," newer member into a project. 

You did not ask about challenges, but I will answer anyway.  School librarians as a whole seem to be an older demographic as they more often than not come to school librarianship from a teaching career.  A number of states have the teaching requirement as a prerequisite for certification.  Also, when we do identify "young in age" school librarians, we often find that family responsibilities (e.g. young children) limit their already limited time.

I'm copying AASL's current president, Cassandra Barnett in case I have overlooked the obvious!

I'll look forward to seeing the results of the research.

 

 

b. Assn. of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) - Kim & Eric

ACRL overall initiatives:

  • Top 10 Ways to Get Involved in ACRL
  • ACRL Involvement ideas - attached PDF
  • ACRL OnPoint Chat: November 12, 2009: Getting Involved With ACRL (10:00 a.m. Pacific | 11:00 a.m. Mountain | 12:00 p.m. Central | 1:00 p.m. Eastern)In this discussion, ACRL Vice-President Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe and Executive Director Mary Ellen Davis will answer your questions about the wide variety of ways to make the most of your membership by getting involved in ACRL. Learn how and when committee appointments are made along with other ways you can become more active in the ACRL community and contribute to the profession. (Kim sat in on part of this)
  • ACRL members can create Interest Groups within ACRL for areas of current interest to members which are not otherwise well represented. Interest Groups are designed to provide a more dynamic system for members to form groups around important emerging issues in the profession, and to increase opportunities for involvement within our organization. Interest Groups are intended to be very fluid, and can be formed easily and disband quickly in response to environmental changes. For more information, see the "Interest Group FAQ" at http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/resources/tipsheets/ig_faq08.pdf
  • The ACRL Residency Interest Group has launched a new podcast series called the "Newbie Dispatches."  It is a set of 'casts on a variety of topics of interest to current library school students, recent graduates, early career librarians, and former and current library residents.  The first  podcast is on publishing a manuscript for the first time, writing a manuscript prospectus, and getting into the world of academic publishing. http://acrl.ala.org/residency/?p=995

African American Studies Librarians Section (AFAS)
Anthropology and Sociology Section (ANSS)
Arts Section
Asian, African, and Middle Eastern Section (AAMES)
College Libraries Section (CLS) -
Kim

The sponsored Friday Night Feast dinners, the event we recently held at the last ACRL conference (with the really inexpensive dinner and free ones to new CLS members) are two examples that come to mind.  Our support of an Emerging Leader is something else too.  Plus the Research Coach, while not specifically targeted toward the identified population, might by default include a larger proportion of that group who are still working on their first publications whether for tenure or professional growth. --Irene Herold

Community and Junior College Libraries Section (CJCLS) - Kim
Distance Learning Section (DLS) -
Kim
Education and Behavioral Sciences Section (EBSS)
Instruction Section (IS)
Law and Political Science Section (LPSS)
Literatures in English Section (LES) -
Kim
Rare Books and Manuscripts Section (RBMS)

The following initiatives of the section have been popular with new and younger members:

***Scholarships - http://rbms.info/committees/scholarships/index.shtml

***Buddy Program - http://rbms.info/committees/membership_and_professional/buddy_program/index.shtml

***Mentoring Program - http://rbms.info/committees/membership_and_professional/mentoring_program/index.shtml

***Educational Opportunities Directory - http://rbms.info/committees/membership_and_professional/educational_opportunities/index.shtml

***At the annual RBMS Preconference, we do an Orientation to RBMS Program prior to the opening reception and hold a new members social (dutch-treat dinner)

***The newest project of the M&PD Committee is a (hopefully) soon-to-be-launched FAQ for librarians and archivists new to the profession.

***The RBMS Diversity Committee ( http://rbms.info/committees/diversity/index.shtml ) has an active outreach program.  They have developed a toolkit for introducing special collections librarianship to high-school, undergraduate, graduate, and paraprofessionals.  The Diversity Committee is co-chaired by Veronica Reyes-Escudero and Athena Jackson.

Please feel free to call or write for further details.

All best,

Donna

Donna L. Davey

Chair, RBMS M&PD Committee

Science and Technology Section (STS) - Kim
Slavic and East European Section(SEES)
University Libraries Section (ULS) -
Kim

  • Conference socials.
  • Creation of new committees on engaging current issues has brought in some new/young members.
  • Sponsored an EL, which led to her being appointed to multiple ULS committees -- very successful.

Western European Studies Section (WESS)
Women's Studies Section (WSS)

c. Assn. for Library Collections and Technical Services (ALCTS) - Emily (E-mail sent)

  • Interns on committees within division
  • any person who fills out volunteer form gets some sort of appointment
  • virtual committee memberships
  • New Public Library Tech services IG started seems to have attracted a lot of people
  • ALCTS Membership Committee (spoke with Chair of this committee)
    • ALCTS 101--targeted to newer members, after ALCTS 101 hoping to host a happy hour or social
    • Will be partnering with NMRT to do outreach to students, student chapters
    • has a virtual members
    • working on messaging scenarios to welcome people to the division, to celebrate anniversaries in the division (5, 10 years, etc) and also did you forget to renew messages.
    • Hoping to do a retention study for those to do drop membership. Try to re-engage these people with ideas of: lower division fees for a while, lower pre-conference costs, appoint those who want to a committee.
    • Recommendations: get people involved and they will stay, lower conference/membership rates, mentoring, newtorking opportunities for younger people, create buddy system for conference a new attendee with a veteran attendee to have dialog before and during conference (might partner with NMRT)
  • ALCTS New Member Interest Group (Spoke with Chair)
    • Hosting a "ALCTS, What's in it for me?" program at Annual
    • Had ALCTS 101 at Annual--presents sections, provides networking opportunity
    • Hosts e-fora (online discussions, asynchronous) on topics related to the group. Noticed in these that people would really like more affordable regional events.
    • Call for bloggers and volunteers is on their conntect space.
    • Created for new members to have a voice, to this end the structure includes "community coordinators" as that voice
    • ALCTS is a diverse talent community, want to set up structure around this community.
    • Recommendations: need to have a place to cross division boundaries. ALA too siloed, need more interaction with other divisions, quanitfy quantify quantify and prove we need crossover, need to do a better job to get people in volved in divisions or sections, needs to be a DIRECT line of communication to decision makers in the division (face time), does not currently see it, utilize ALA Connect as a platform for these confersations, Why do I have to go through 5 people to get something done?

d. Assn. for Library Service to Children (ALSC) - Eric

e. Assn. of Library Trustees, Advocates Friends & Foundations - Eric

f. Assn. of Specialized & Cooperative Library Agencies (ASCLA) - Katherine

Hi Katherine,

ASCLA does not have any official initiatives to meet the needs or attract the participation of young librarians at this time. I'll have to consult with the executive committee for advice retaining young librarians and get back to you. 

g. Library and Information Technology Assn. (LITA) - Kim (*ask Derik/Brett for contact)

h. Library Leadership & Management Assn. (LLAMA) - Katherine - no response

i. Public Library Assn. (PLA) - Kelvin

j. Reference & User Services Assn. (RUSA) - Emily (E-mail Sent)

  •  Had an Emerging Leaders Task Force (Emily was a chair for this).
  • Experimenting with virtual conference attendance
  • Spectrum Scholars initiative
  • Funding Emerging Leader participants
  • "Five Things A New Librarian Should Know about" initiative. A RUSA Presidential initiative to have each committee of RUSA put up a web page with information about the 5 things new librarians should know about it.  

k. The Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) - Kelvin

I.Strategy for finding out what a division/office does to retain and involve young librarians.a.Explore Division/Office Websiteb.Identify if there are membership or appointment committees and look at documentation from those groupsc.Contact the chair of the division asking for the right people to talk to about this (maybe we could make a boiler-plate e-mail for chairs?)d.Etce.EtcII.OfficesA synthesis on what Offices are doing, then reports on individual offices below:a.OLOSb.Etcc.EtcIII.DivisionsA synthesis on what Divisions are doing, then reports on individual divisions below:a.ACRLb.PLAc.YALSAd.Etce.I.Strategy for finding out what a division/office does to retain and involve young librarians.a.Explore Division/Office Websiteb.Identify if there are membership or appointment committees and look at documentation from those groupsc.Contact the chair of the division asking for the right people to talk to about this (maybe we could make a boiler-plate e-mail for chairs?)d.Etce.EtcII.OfficesA synthesis on what Offices are doing, then reports on individual offices below:a.OLOSb.Etcc.EtcIII.DivisionsA synthesis on what Divisions are doing, then reports on individual divisions below:a.ACRLb.PLAc.YALSAd.Etce.Etc

IV. Other Groups working towards this goal within ALA

a. NMRT - Laurel

  • numerous online discussion forums over the listserv
  • conference orientations, where speakers discuss how to make the most of the conference experience
  • current councilor is proactive in disseminating information to members about how council works, etc.
  • guaranteed committee appointments
  • virtual participation 
  • funds an Emerging Leader

b. 7 Measures of Success Working Group - Kim

More...

Pages

This Connect community was created by the Young Professionals Task Force, an ALA-sanctioned committee. The TF is charged with identifying strategies and actions for ALA, its offices, committees, divisions and round tables to be more responsive to the young librarians who will be its members and future leaders with a goal of increasing retention rates. We were formerly referred to as the Young Turks Task Force.

This community includes an awesome Think Tank of like-minded individuals who provide feedback on working group projects.

All are welcome to join and participate.

Subscribe to Young Professionals Working Group