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Discussion ALA Annual 2012 Interest Group Line Up

by Amy Rudersdorf on Mon, Jun 11, 2012 at 08:47 am

Join us for another great line up in Anaheim -- definitely worth waking up for our 8 am session!

 

WEB-BASED DIGITAL PRESERVATION PRACTICE: IT’S NOT JUST FOR WEB PAGES ANYMORE.

DIGITAL PRESERVATION INTEREST GROUP MEETING
SUNDAY, JUNE 24
HYATT- Pacific Room
8-10 AM         

 

A: Collecting Born-Digital Materials from the Web: It’s a CINCH!

Join us for another great line up in Anaheim -- definitely worth waking up for our 8 am session!

 

WEB-BASED DIGITAL PRESERVATION PRACTICE: IT’S NOT JUST FOR WEB PAGES ANYMORE.

DIGITAL PRESERVATION INTEREST GROUP MEETING
SUNDAY, JUNE 24
HYATT- Pacific Room
8-10 AM         

 

A: Collecting Born-Digital Materials from the Web: It’s a CINCH!

Since August 2011, thanks to an Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) Sparks! Ignition grant, staff from the State Library of North Carolina in conjunction with staff from the North Carolina Libraries for Virtual Education (NCLIVE) have been developing the CINCH tool, which Captures, INgests, and CHecksums records the Library is legislatively mandated to maintain. This tool incorporates a capture utility and existing digital preservation technologies to create a more-automated workflow for capturing online files for preservation and access. This presentation will describe the tool’s development, functionality, and projected use.

 Lisa Gregory works as Digital Projects Liaison in the Digital Information Management Program at the State Library of North Carolina.  She currently manages one of the State Library’s off-site digitization project, works with interface design and usability, and participates in research and development of digital preservation tools and workflows. 

 

B. The Web is a Mess: or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Web Archiving

Web Archiving: While most libraries put a great deal of effort into establishing a dynamic and engaging web presence for their institution, many are not currently preserving their own web presence or web content related to their institution's mission or collecting policies. This session will discuss the importance of web archiving and provide use cases, discuss best practices, lessons learned, challenges and successes and provide an overview of Archive-It, a web archiving service.

Lori Donovan is a Partner Specialist at the Internet Archive helping libraries, archives and othercultural institutions archive the web. Lori has a Masters of Science in Information from the University of Michigan specializing in Archives and Digital Preservation. 

 

C. Digital Preservation and Dynamic Reference: Preserving living references, databases, and other “Book-like Objects”

In an era where the lines between an ebook and a database are increasingly blurred and online learning platforms incorporate gaming or virtual world elements, the question of how to preserve such complex works is more urgent than ever. What is being done now to preserve such content? What are the key question that publishers and libraries ought to be asking?  What precisely should we be trying to preserve? Contribute your voice to this essential discussion to frame the preservation policies of the near future.

Dr. Heather Ruland Staines is Senior Manager eOperations for Springer. She manages the global preservation policies for both Springer and BioMed Central. She is currently Publisher Co-Chair of CLOCKSS and Chair of the ALCTS CRS Holdings Information Committee. She was also recently elected to serve on the Board of the Society for Scholarly Publishers.

 

Be sure to check out some of the other digital preservation, curation, and archiving-related interest groups, too!

The Digital Curation Interest Group (ACRL), Digital Conversion Interest Group (ALCTS PARS), Intellectual Access to Preservation Metadata Interest Group (ALCTS PARS), and Digital Preservation Interest Group (ALCTS PARS) are pleased to announce the results of their collaboratively planned business meetings for 2012 ALA Annual in Anaheim, CA. All the below business meetings occur in the same hotel.

Below is the schedule for the following Interest Group Business Meeting Discussions at ALA Annual. Full details can also be found online at: http://goo.gl/rZ0wr

SATURDAY, June 23rd, 2012
10:30 am-12:00 pm
Digital Curation Interest Group (ACRL)
Location: HYATT-Grand Ballroom E

Meeting Summary:

DataBib: An Online Bibliography of Research Data Repositories (Michael Witt, Research Librarian & Assistant Professor, Purdue University, D2C2) Collaborative Approaches to Digital Curation (Jared Lyle, ICPSR, University of Michigan, Libbie Stephenson, Director, UCLA Social Science Data Archive, Ron Nakao, Data Specialist, Stanford Libraries)

 

1:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Digital Conversion Interest Group (ALCTS - PARS)
Location: HYATT-Grand Ballroom E

Meeting Summary:

Adventures in Digital Curation (Meg Meiman, Coordinator, Undergraduate Research Program, University of Delaware) Starting Small: Practical First Steps in Digital Preservation (Helen K. Bailey, Preservation Specialist, Dartmouth College Library)

 

4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Intellectual Access to Preservation Metadata Interest Group (ALCTS - PARS)
Location: HYATT-Pacific Room

Meeting Summary:

Editing and Embedding Audio-Visual Metadata with MetaEdit (Chris Lacinak, President, AudioVisual Preservation Solutions) Discover the Technical Metadata in your Still Image Digital Files (Joan DaShiell, Product Manager for Digitization Services, Preservation Services Center, Backstage Library Works, Bethlehem, PA)

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Discussion 2011 Annual Meeting Update

by Amy Rudersdorf on Wed, Jun 29, 2011 at 11:05 am

We hope you enjoyed our session last week at ALA Annual. There are a couple of follow up items to post about:

We hope you enjoyed our session last week at ALA Annual. There are a couple of follow up items to post about:

  1. Presentations from the session ("It's all geek to me" on cloud/grid/hosted storage and the introduction to ArchiveMatica) are available in the "Recent Files" box in the navigation column on the right.

    We know that all of the speakers would be glad to discuss further any of their tools, so please feel free to contact them. Or, contact Amy Rudersdorf (amy.rudersdorf@ncdcr.gov) to get in touch with them for you.

    These presentations are only available to Digital Preservation Interest Group members through ALA Connect. To become a member, click on the green "join" box in the navigation column on the right.

    Notes from the Intellectual Access to Preservation Data Interest Group are also posted. Check out  http://connect.ala.org/node/137626

  2. We're still looking for a new co-chair for to serve from 2011 to 2013. This is a two-year appointment, starting July 1. The commitment is minimal and requires only submitting reports from sessions (assuming you are able to attend), assisting in the creation of session panels or identifying appropriate speakers. Please contact Amy Rudersdorf (amy.rudersdorf@ncdcr.gov) if you are interested in this opportunity.

 

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Poll Will you be attending the DPIG meeting at ALA in New Orleans?

by Amy Rudersdorf on Thu, Jun 9, 2011 at 09:13 am
You betcha
75% (3 votes)
Not this time
25% (1 vote)
Total votes: 4

Event Digital Preservation Interest Group

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Fri, Jun 20, 2014 at 07:37 pm

Meeting of the interest group

More information about this conference session

Discussion Report and Presentations from the Digital Preservation Interest Group meeting at ALA Midwinter 2014 Philadelphia

by Lance Stuchell on Thu, Mar 13, 2014 at 12:14 pm

After a brief business meeting, ten lighting talks were presented by participants in the National Digital Stewardship Residency program.

After a brief business meeting, ten lighting talks were presented by participants in the National Digital Stewardship Residency program.

The National Digital Stewardship Residency program offers ten recent Master’s-level graduates in the library science and related digital fields the opportunity to gain professional experience at the Library of Congress and other prestigious host institutions in the Washington, D.C. area.  The inaugural class of residents arrived in Washington in September 2013 to participate in the nine-month program.  The lightning talk session introduced the residents and expanded upon their project work and experience as residents in the program. The residents and projects that were discussed included:

* Julia Blase; University of Denver; National Security Archive; to take a snapshot of all archive activities that involve the capture, preservation and publication of digital assets.

* Heidi Dowding; Wayne State University; Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection; to identify an institutional solution for long-term digital asset management, conduct research on a variety of software systems and draft an institutional policy for the appraisal and selection of content destined for preservation.

* Maureen Harlow; University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; National Library of Medicine; create a collection of web content on a specific theme or topic of interest such as medicine and art or the e-patient movement.

* Jaime McCurry; Long Island University; Folger Shakespeare Library; to establish local routines and best practices for archiving and preserving the institution’s digital content.

* Lee Nilsson; Eastern Washington University; Library of Congress, Office of Strategic Initiatives; to analyze the future risk of obsolescence to digital formats used at the Library and work with Library staff to develop an action plan to prevent the risks.

* Margo Padilla; San Jose State University, Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities; to create and share a research report for access models and collection interfaces for born-digital literary materials. She will also submit recommendations for access policies for born-digital collections.

* Emily Reynolds; University of Michigan; The World Bank Group; to facilitate and coordinate the eArchives digitization project, resulting in the creation of a digitized and cataloged historical collection of key archival materials representing more than 60 years of global development work.

* Molly Schwartz; University of Maryland; Association of Research Libraries; to strengthen and expand a new initiative on digital accessibility in research libraries by incorporating a universal design approach to library collections and services.

* Erica Titkemeyer; New York University; Smithsonian Institution Archives; to identify the specialized digital and curatorial requirements of time-based media art and establish a benchmark of best practices to ensure that institution’s archives will stand the test of time.

* Lauren Work; University of Washington; Public Broadcasting Service; to develop and apply evaluation tools, define selection criteria and outline recommended workflows needed to execute a successful analog digitization initiative for the PBS moving image collection.

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Event Digital Preservation Interest Group

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Tue, Jan 7, 2014 at 07:22 pm

The session will feature lighting talks from participants in the National Digital Stewardship Residency program.

The session will feature lighting talks from participants in the National Digital Stewardship Residency program.

The National Digital Stewardship Residency program offers ten recent Master’s-level graduates in the library science and related digital fields the opportunity to gain professional experience at the Library of Congress and other prestigious host institutions in the Washington, D.C. area. The inaugural class of residents arrived in Washington in September 2013 to participate in the nine-month program. This lightning talk session will introduce the residents and expand upon their project work and experience as residents in the program. The residents and projects that will be discussed are:

Julia Blase; University of Denver; National Security Archive; to take a snapshot of all archive activities that involve the capture, preservation and publication of digital assets.

Heidi Dowding; Wayne State University; Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection; to identify an institutional solution for long-term digital asset management, conduct research on a variety of software systems and draft an institutional policy for the appraisal and selection of content destined for preservation.

Maureen Harlow; University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; National Library of Medicine; create a collection of web content on a specific theme or topic of interest such as medicine and art or the e-patient movement.

Jaime McCurry; Long Island University; Folger Shakespeare Library; to establish local routines and best practices for archiving and preserving the institution’s digital content.

Lee Nilsson; Eastern Washington University; Library of Congress, Office of Strategic Initiatives; to analyze the future risk of obsolescence to digital formats used at the Library and work with Library staff to develop an action plan to prevent the risks.

Margo Padilla; San Jose State University, Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities; to create and share a research report for access models and collection interfaces for born-digital literary materials. She will also submit recommendations for access policies for born-digital collections.

Emily Reynolds; University of Michigan; The World Bank Group; to facilitate and coordinate the eArchives digitization project, resulting in the creation of a digitized and cataloged historical collection of key archival materials representing more than 60 years of global development work.

Molly Schwartz; University of Maryland; Association of Research Libraries; to strengthen and expand a new initiative on digital accessibility in research libraries by incorporating a universal design approach to library collections and services.

Erica Titkemeyer; New York University; Smithsonian Institution Archives; to identify the specialized digital and curatorial requirements of time-based media art and establish a benchmark of best practices to ensure that institution’s archives will stand the test of time.

Lauren Work; University of Washington; Public Broadcasting Service; to develop and apply evaluation tools, define selection criteria and outline recommended workflows needed to execute a successful analog digitization initiative for the PBS moving image collection.

More information about this conference session

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Event Digital Preservation Interest Group

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Fri, Jun 7, 2013 at 01:25 pm

Meeting of the interest group

More information about this conference session

Discussion Report and Presentations from the Digital Preservation Interest Group meeting at ALA Midwinter 2013 Seattle

by Meghan Bergin on Tue, Feb 12, 2013 at 01:54 pm

After a brief business meeting, four talks were presented.

*Lots of Copies keep Docs Safe: Using LOCKSS to create distributed digital government information depositories* - James Jacobs, Stanford University's Green Library and Amanda Wakaruk, University of Alberta Libraries

After a brief business meeting, four talks were presented.

*Lots of Copies keep Docs Safe: Using LOCKSS to create distributed digital government information depositories* - James Jacobs, Stanford University's Green Library and Amanda Wakaruk, University of Alberta Libraries

This presentation will describe the LOCKSS model of digital preservation and why that model is beneficial to apply to the realm of digital government information, describe the USDOCS Private LOCKSS Network (USDocsPLN http://lockss-usdocs.stanford.edu) and the Canadian Government Information Private LOCKSS Network, what we're currently preserving and what our next steps will be.

*An overview of recent publications about managing born-digital materials* - Erin O'Meara, Gates Archive (presented by Sibyl Schaefer)

This talk will give a brief overview of recent publications aimed at providing guidance and statistics on the handling of born-digital materials. These include the ARL SPEC Kit 329: Managing Born-Digital Materials in Special Collections and Archival Materials (http://publications.arl.org/Managing-Born-Digital-Special-Collections-and-Archival-Materials-SPEC-Kit-329), OCLC's two new publications on Demystifying Born Digital (http://www.oclc.org/research/activities/borndigital.html), and a few publications that are forthcoming. The talk will look at the current push for practical guidance and energizing all repositories to assess their holdings and make basic steps to preserve born-digital materials.

*Preserving AutoCAD Files at the University of Montana* - Sam Meister, University of Montana- Missoula

At The University of Montana Maureen and Mike Mansfield Library Archives and Special Collections department we have recently acquired materials from a local architecture firm, including a set of digital files created using the AutoCAD design software. In collaboration with my colleagues, I plan to investigate emulation in parallel with a format migration based preservation strategy for these files, as we determine which strategy will both meet user needs, and be achievable in relation to our specific resource environment as a medium-sized university library. I will discuss the process of acquiring these materials including the use of a donor survey instrument, conducting a feasibility assessment, and utilizing digital forensics tools during initial processing. In addition, I will also discuss the landscape of existing best practices and guidance for preserving and providing access to Computer Aided Design and 3D digital objects, and how we are integrating these best practices into our local context and strategy.

*A Repository Year: Planning and Implementing a Digital Repository at the Computer History Museum* - Paula Jabloner, Computer History Museum and Katerine Kott, consultant

In fall 2011, the Computer History Museum received a grant from Google.org to develop a prototype digital repository within one year. This presentation will describe the processes used to set up the prototype as well as lessons learned. The Computer History Museum holds diverse digital collections--from in-house produced high definition video to legacy software. The size and diversity of the collections present particular challenges, especially for a small organization.

With a focus on creating functional requirements, selecting repository software, selecting storage infrastructure, and implementation challenges, the presentation will be of interest to smaller cultural heritage organizations with limited resources. Larger organizations such as academic research libraries that provide support to museums, archives, and special collections may also find this information useful.

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Discussion Digital Preservation Interest Group session at ALA Midwinter 2013 in Seattle

by Meghan Bergin on Fri, Jan 11, 2013 at 01:42 pm

Sunday, January 27, 2013, 8:30am-10am
The Conference Center of the Washington State Convention Center, Room LL4-5

We plan to have a brief business meeting followed by two 10 minute lightening talks and two longer 20 minute talks with question and answer sessions.

Topics for these talks will include: using LOCKSS to preserve government information, managing born-digital materials, preserving AutoCAD files, and planning and implementing a digital repository.

The two lightening talks will be:

Sunday, January 27, 2013, 8:30am-10am
The Conference Center of the Washington State Convention Center, Room LL4-5

We plan to have a brief business meeting followed by two 10 minute lightening talks and two longer 20 minute talks with question and answer sessions.

Topics for these talks will include: using LOCKSS to preserve government information, managing born-digital materials, preserving AutoCAD files, and planning and implementing a digital repository.

The two lightening talks will be:

*Lots of Copies keep Docs Safe: Using LOCKSS to create distributed digital government information depositories*

This presentation will describe the LOCKSS model of digital preservation and why that model is beneficial to apply to the realm of digital government information, describe the USDOCS Private LOCKSS Network (USDocsPLN http://lockss-usdocs.stanford.edu) and the  Canadian Government Information Private LOCKSS Network, what we're currently preserving and what our next steps will be.

Presenters:

James Jacobs is the Federal Government Information Librarian at Stanford University's Green Library and program lead for the LOCKSS-USDOCS program (http://lockss-usdocs.stanford.edu). He is very active in the library community, having been a long-time member of the Government Documents Roundtable (GODORT) of the American Library Association and having served a 3 year term (2009 - 2012) on Depository Library Council to the Public Printer, including as DLC Chair from 2011 - 2012. He is the co-founder of Free Government Information and Radical Reference and serves on the board of Question Copyright, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that promotes a better public understanding of the history and effects of copyright, and encourages the development of alternatives to information monopolies.

Amanda Wakaruk is the Government Information Librarian at the University of Alberta Libraries. Having worked with government information in public, special, and academic libraries, Amanda (MLIS, MES) is well versed in the precarious nature of government publishing (regardless of format). She is a former chair of the Canadian Library Association's Access to Government Information Interest Group, a long-time member of ALA's Government Documents Roundtable (GODORT), and the incoming Coordinator of the International Documents Task Force (IDTF). Amanda is a member of the Canadian Depository Services Program Library Advisory Committee and the Chair of the nascent Canadian Government Information Private LOCKSS Network Steering Committee.

*An overview of recent publications about managing born-digital materials*

This talk will give a brief overview of recent publications aimed at providing guidance and statistics on the handling of born-digital materials. These include the ARL SPEC Kit 329: Managing Born-Digital Materials in Special Collections and Archival Materials (http://publications.arl.org/Managing-Born-Digital-Special-Collections-and-Archival-Materials-SPEC-Kit-329), OCLC's two new publications on Demystifying Born Digital (http://www.oclc.org/research/activities/borndigital.html), and a few publications that are forthcoming. The talk will look at the current push for practical guidance and energizing all repositories to assess their holdings and make basic steps to preserve born-digital materials.

Presenter:

Erin O'Meara is an Archivist at the Gates Archive, where she manages digital strategy and the acquisition and preservation of archival collections. From 2009-2011, she was the Electronic Records Archivist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where she helped deploy the Carolina Digital Repository. Before joining UNC Libraries, Erin served as the Electronic Records Archivist at the University of Oregon and as a NHPRC Electronic Records Research Fellow from 2006-2007, where she researched the recordkeeping practices of social scientists conducting data-intensive research. Erin received her Master of Archival Studies in 2004 from the University of British Columbia.  While at UBC, she conducted research for the InterPARES 2 Project pertaining to archaeological records managed in a Geographic Information System.

The two longer talks will be:

*Preserving AutoCAD Files at the University of Montana*

At The University of Montana Maureen and Mike Mansfield Library Archives and Special Collections department we have recently acquired materials from a local architecture firm, including a set of digital files created using the AutoCAD design software. In collaboration with my colleagues, I plan to investigate emulation in parallel with a format migration based preservation strategy for these files, as we determine which strategy will both meet user needs, and be achievable in relation to our specific resource environment as a medium-sized university library. I will discuss the process of acquiring these materials including the use of a donor survey instrument, conducting a feasibility assessment, and utilizing digital forensics tools during initial processing. In addition, I will also discuss the landscape of existing best practices and guidance for preserving and providing access to Computer Aided Design and 3D digital objects, and how we are integrating these best practices into our local context and strategy.

Presenter:

Sam Meister is a Digital Archivist and Assistant Professor in the Mansfield Library at the University of Montana-Missoula. Previously, he worked as an Archival Consultant on a Library of Congress funded project to collect and preserve the records of failed Dot Com businesses. He holds a Master of Library and Information Science degree from San Jose State University, where he completed a thesis on “Recordkeeping in Small Nonprofit Organizations”. He is passionate about developing workflows, and is learning how to ride a bike on icy winter streets.

*A Repository Year: Planning and Implementing a Digital Repository at the Computer History Museum*

In fall 2011, the Computer History Museum received a grant from Google.org to develop a prototype digital repository within one year. This presentation will describe the processes used to set up the prototype as well as lessons learned. The Computer History Museum holds diverse digital collections--from in-house produced high definition video to legacy software. The size and diversity of the collections present particular challenges, especially for a small organization.

With a focus on creating functional requirements, selecting repository software, selecting storage infrastructure, and implementation challenges, the presentation will be of interest to smaller cultural heritage organizations with limited resources. Larger organizations such as academic research libraries that provide support to museums, archives, and special collections may also find this information useful.

Presenters:

Paula Jabloner is Director of Collections at the Computer History Museum. Paula engages in department strategic planning and development while directing the work of the collections staff engaged in acquisitions, preservation, and providing access to the Museum's Collections. She is currently directing the creation of the Museum's first digital repository.

Katherine Kott is an organization development and project management consultant to libraries and other cultural heritage organizations. She was the digital repository consultant for the Computer History Museum digital repository project.

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To serve as a venue for discussing the preservation management of digital assets whether commercial, born-digital or converted e-resources.

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