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Event Applying Agile Practices to Metadata Workflows: Data and People in Transition

by E. Shieh on Thu, Jun 29, 2017 at 10:59 am

 

 

Dates: Monday, June 26 @ 8:30 AM-10:00 AM

Conference Venue: McCormick Place: MCP W190a

Session title: 

Applying Agile Practices to Metadata Workflows: Data and People in Transition

 

Description:

 

Research activities are heavily dependent upon content found on the web. Moreover, the web is moving rapidly from the document-based web to the semantic web where anyone can say anything about any topic (the AAA slogan). http://goo.gl/qHvmST

 

The Semantic Web is a jungle where data are rich and massive, interconnected without roadmaps, index, or guidance. What it has is a series of tools and languages that are making their way into libraries' working spaces. Ontologies, linked data, RDF, data modeling, metadata, identity management, etc., have been morphed into common vocabularies for information services. Our cataloging and metadata community embraced the RDF language as a potential replacement for MARC as the current encoding standard. Cataloging professionals have begun preparing the alignment of libraries' very siloed MARC data to linked open data. While many of us still consider the semantic web that moves library data toward linked data as a daunting revolution for the profession, others remain skeptical of its potential and usefulness.

 

In adjusting to the challenges of transitioning library data toward linked data, library technical services managers have been looking for practices that will enable them to create robust and responsive services in order to deliver more returns. Some have found the trend in software development industry of applying agile principles for deliverables very applicable and attractive for managing library projects. Its acceptance is gaining momentum in libraries beyond their IT departments. How will the team-based approach help transitioning workflows that involve library data and library staff who need reassurances about their talents and contributions? In an effort to offer new ways of thinking about how metadata and cataloging work is accomplished, this session will look at both an implementation of a linked data-based workflow and a separate environment that utilizes agile project management to deliver results.

 

Speakers:

Lisa Lorenzo
Metadata Librarian
Michigan State University
lorenzo7@mail.lib.msu.edu

Kate Harcourt
Director, Original and Special Materials Cataloging
Columbia University Libraries
harcourt@columbia.edu

Melanie Wacker, @mwacker3
Metadata Coordinator
Columbia University Libraries
mw2064@columbia.edu

 


Speaker Bios & Abstracts:

Agile and Scrum in the Michigan State University Libraries Digital Repository

Lisa Bio:

Lisa Lorenzo is a metadata librarian at Michigan State University Libraries working primarily with the library’s digital repository metadata. She is a member of an Agile development team working to improve and expand the MSUL digital repository and is responsible for transforming metadata from various sources and formats into standards-compliant MODS and Dublin Core to facilitate searching within the repository and metadata reuse in other systems, such as the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA). Lisa’s recent projects undertaken with her colleagues on the development team include normalizing MODS records across all collections in the repository, updating and implementing local metadata guidelines documentation, and dynamically generating JSON-LD metadata as part of an experimental search engine optimization initiative. She also has a quarter-time appointment as a reference librarian and participates in national and regional professional organizations.

 

 

Abstract:
In 2014, Michigan State University Libraries (MSUL) launched its online digital repository, a Fedora Commons repository with an Islandora front end. As the repository’s development team (RepoTeam) grew and more collections were slated for ingestion into the site, the need for a structured project management approach became apparent. In 2016, Scrum, an Agile project management framework, was adopted. RepoTeam’s use of the Scrum framework has evolved as its members have changed and the digital repository has expanded to include more collections. This presentation will outline the Scrum-based Agile framework used in the development of the MSUL digital repository with particular attention to how this process has improved metadata creation and maintenance. It will also provide a discussion on the challenges and limitations of adapting a project management style designed for a corporate software development setting to a library environment.

 

 

Applying Agile Practices to Metadata Workflows: People in Transition

Kate Bio:

Kate Harcourt is the Director of Original And Special Materials Processing at Columbia University Libraries and Information Services. The Division consists of 9 librarians and  6 support staff. She manages original cataloging including rare books, digital metadata and special formats such as Music and Serials.  The Division is the home for projects and new initiatives such as web archiving and she has been active in Mellon and CLIR grants including  2CUL and LD4P (Linked Data for Production).  Kate has been Columbia’s PCC BIBCO representative since 1997 and is the outgoing Chair of the PCC.  During her tenure as Chair, several key committees were formed in response to the PCC Vision, Mission and Strategic Directions to move the community forward in linked data and identities management. She has published papers in Library Resources and Technical Services and Collaborative Librarianship.


Abstract:
This presentation will address ways in which managers can use agile practices developed for software development to empower staff and create a workplace culture that encourages collaboration and experimentation.  
 

 

Managing Ongoing Change in Columbia's Metadata Workflows

Melanie Bio:

Melanie Wacker is Metadata Coordinator at Columbia University Libraries and Information Services. She works with colleagues across the organization to ensure the integration of digital metadata with local and national systems to enable information discovery. Her responsibilities include development of application profiles for digital collections, metadata creation, training, consultations, and NACO/SACO work. Melanie is currently the Columbia lead for her institution’s LD4P (Linked Data for Production) project participation. She is active in several national and international committees and task forces and has published papers in Library Resources and Technical Services, Cataloging & Classification Quarterly, Alexandria, and Journal of Library Metadata.
 


Abstract:
Columbia University Libraries’ non-MARC metadata workflow does not exist in a vacuum. Many outside influences have introduced change in recent years. Faceted discovery interfaces, new cataloging rules (RDA), metadata doing double duty in various systems, more sprint-oriented development approaches and a move towards linked data have played a role. Adapting to ongoing change has become the new normal.


This presentation will explore first the types of changes that have become necessary to our workflow both in response to current developments and in order to produce more linked-data ready metadata for the future and then take a look at the impact that this has had on staff development and responsibilities.

 

Lisa's and Melanie's sidles and Kate's notes are attached.

 

 

 

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Event Transformation of Cataloging and Metadata Operations and Application of Scrum Principles

by E. Shieh on Mon, Feb 13, 2017 at 08:12 am

ALA Midwinter 2017

Location: Atlanta, GA
Dates: Monday, January 23 8:30 AM-10:00 AM
Conference Venue: GWCC A312
Twitter: #alctsmw17hoc

 

Session title:  Transformation of Cataloging and Metadata Operations and Application of Scrum Principles

ALA Midwinter 2017

Location: Atlanta, GA
Dates: Monday, January 23 8:30 AM-10:00 AM
Conference Venue: GWCC A312
Twitter: #alctsmw17hoc

 

Session title:  Transformation of Cataloging and Metadata Operations and Application of Scrum Principles

Description: Heads of metadata and cataloging departments are continuously facing ample opportunities to implement and adjust daily and routine workflow from the smallest and specifics to wider and broader scale. Many are making changes to their management of resource based on evidence-based data analyses using business models and values. Library managers are increasingly adopting principles and strategies from software development industry. These driving strategies enable libraries to developing robust and responsive services to produce and deliver more returns. Metadata and cataloging heads are not exempted from this trend. In the business world, customer input and collaboration are at the heart of this trend which is also the focal point of library services.

Scrum is an agile development method, which concentrates particularly on how to manage tasks within a team-based development environment. Scrum is the most popular and widely adopted agile method. It enables teams to:

  • Figure out how to do the work

  • Do the work

  • Identify what's getting in its way

  • Take responsibility to resolve all the difficulties within its scope

  • Work with other parts of the organization to resolve concerns outside their control

 

Review of program

Title: Organization and Structure of Cataloging Units in Academic Libraries Research Project.

Speakers:

Jeremy Myntti Jeremy.Myntti@utah.edu
Head of Digital Library Services, University of Utah

Liz Woolcott liz.woolcott@usu.edu
Head of Cataloging and Metadata Services, Utah State University

 

Title: Two weeks at a time: Applying agile frameworks to library practice

Speaker:

Hannah Sommers @hsommers
Associate University Librarian
George Washington University
hsommers@gwu.edu

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Event Toward Semantic Metadata Aggregation for DPLA and Beyond

by Daniel Lovins on Fri, Jun 17, 2016 at 08:35 am

What happens when metadata that were created for a specific library catalog are aggregated and repurposed for a network-scale discovery environment like DPLA? What kinds of data modeling, mapping, remediation, and reconciliation are needed in advance of such aggregation?  What happens when metadata from different domains (e.g., galleries, libraries, archives, museums), created with different standards and schemas are forced to interoperate semantically?

What happens when metadata that were created for a specific library catalog are aggregated and repurposed for a network-scale discovery environment like DPLA? What kinds of data modeling, mapping, remediation, and reconciliation are needed in advance of such aggregation?  What happens when metadata from different domains (e.g., galleries, libraries, archives, museums), created with different standards and schemas are forced to interoperate semantically? These are some of the questions will be investigating at the Heads of Cataloging/Metadata Services Interest Group meeting at ALA Annual. Our panelists will be Josh Hadro, Deputy Director of NYPL Labs and Jason Roy, Director of Digital Library Services at the Minnesota Digital Library. Please mark your calendars and join us on Monday, June 27, 8:30-10 am.

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Event ALA 2016 Midwinter program in Boston: Modeling and Management of non-Bibliographic Entities in Library and Archival Databases

by Daniel Lovins on Tue, Dec 22, 2015 at 03:22 pm

Please join the Heads of Cataloging Interest Group (Hoc-IG) for two presentations on the modeling and management of non-bibliographic entities in library and archival databases.

Please join the Heads of Cataloging Interest Group (Hoc-IG) for two presentations on the modeling and management of non-bibliographic entities in library and archival databases.

1. Nancy Lorimer, Head of Metadata Services at Stanford University, will be discussing “Authorities, Entities, Real World Objects, and ... Cats?: Moving from authority creation to identity management.” As cataloging departments begin to prepare for the move to a linked data environment, such as BIBFRAME, for their daily production, the management of non-work/instance entities, such as people and corporations, soon emerges as a major hurdle to cross. This talk will explore some of the issues: the importance of URIs in authority data; linking URIs with data as it is transformed from MARC to BIBFRAME; and the differences between identity management, based on real world objects (RWOs) and traditional authority data.

2. Katherine Wisser, a professor of library and information science at Simmons College, will be discussing developments in Encoded Archival Context: Corporate Bodies, Persons, and Families (EAC-CPF).

In addition to sharing technical details and theoretical considerations, we will ask our panelists to consider issues around training, workflow, and infrastructure, i.e., conditions that help us ensure effective implementations at the local level. They will also help us understand the difference between traditional authority records and the modeling of real world objects (RWOs).

Program description will be added to ALA Scheduler [1] ASAP.

Daniel Lovins and Jackie Shieh, HoC-IG 2016 Co-Chairs

[1] http://www.eventscribe.com/2016/ala-midwinter/ 

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Event Heads of Cataloging Interest Group

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Wed, Jul 1, 2015 at 09:30 am

Our two panelists will be discussing one of the most important issues facing technical services today, namely, whether and how to migrate to a next-generation ILS, or what Marshal Breeding has called "Library Services Platforms" [1]. How are critical licensing decisions made? What kind of advance planning and analysis is required? What advice can be given to those of us yet to take the plunge?

Our two panelists will be discussing one of the most important issues facing technical services today, namely, whether and how to migrate to a next-generation ILS, or what Marshal Breeding has called "Library Services Platforms" [1]. How are critical licensing decisions made? What kind of advance planning and analysis is required? What advice can be given to those of us yet to take the plunge? The stakes are high as we consider options for in-house development, cloud-hosting, and software-as-a-service (SaaS), which in turn affect decisions on organizational structure, professional development, and staff recruitment. Beth Camden, Director of Information Processing at the University of Pennsylvania Libraries, will discuss a migration to Kuali OLE [2], and Joseph Kiegel, Head of Cataloging and Metadata Services at the University of Washington Libraries, will discuss a migration to Ex Libris's Alma [3]. There will be ample time at the end for audience questions and comments. [1] http://www.niso.org/apps/group_public/download.php/9922/FE_Grant_Future_... [2] https://www.kuali.org/ole [3] http://www.exlibrisgroup.com/category/AlmaOverview

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Event ALCTS Heads of Cataloging IG Panelists to Discuss Migration to Kuali OLE and Ex Libris Alma

by Daniel Lovins on Mon, Jun 1, 2015 at 09:21 am

The ALCTS Heads of Cataloging Interest Group invites you to join us in San Francisco, 8:30-10:00 AM, Monday, June 29th, at the Moscone Convention Center, room 2010 (W).

The ALCTS Heads of Cataloging Interest Group invites you to join us in San Francisco, 8:30-10:00 AM, Monday, June 29th, at the Moscone Convention Center, room 2010 (W).

Our two panelists will be discussing one of the most important issues facing technical services today, namely, whether and how to migrate to a next-generation ILS, or what Marshal Breeding has called "Library Services Platforms" [1]. How are critical licensing decisions made? What kind of advance planning and analysis is required? What advice can be given to those of us yet to take the plunge? The stakes are high as we consider options for in-house development, cloud-hosting, and software-as-a-service (SaaS), which in turn affect decisions on organizational structure, professional development, and staff recruitment.

Beth Camden, Director of Information Processing at the University of Pennsylvania Libraries, will discuss a migration to Kuali OLE [2], and Joseph Kiegel, Head of Cataloging and Metadata Services at the University of Washington Libraries, will discuss a migration to Ex Libris's Alma [3]. There will be ample time at the end for audience questions and comments.

We hope you can attend what promises to be a dynamic and substantive discussion.

[1] http://www.niso.org/apps/group_public/download.php/9922/FE_Grant_Future_...

[2] https://www.kuali.org/ole

[3] http://www.exlibrisgroup.com/category/AlmaOverview

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Event Heads of Cataloging Interest Group

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Mon, Jan 26, 2015 at 02:44 pm

The Heads of Cataloging IG will be discussing BIBFRAME testing at George Washington University and the BIBFLOW project [1] at the University of California Davis (in collaboration with Zepheira).

The Heads of Cataloging IG will be discussing BIBFRAME testing at George Washington University and the BIBFLOW project [1] at the University of California Davis (in collaboration with Zepheira).

In addition to updates on their respective projects, we will ask our two speakers to help us think about strategic priorities, e.g.: What kind of investments are needed in training and infrastructure? What skills need to be developed to prepare staff for a future of linked data catalogs and workflows? How do we marshal our limited resources to have the biggest impact on our strategic goals? What conversations do we need to have with stakeholders throughout our library and institution?

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Event Heads of Cataloging Interest Group

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Wed, Jul 16, 2014 at 01:20 pm

The ALCTS Heads of Cataloging Interest Group invites you to join our two distinguished speakers in Las Vegas. We continue our theme from the last Midwinter Meetings discussing how to “transform” the areas of cataloging and metadata. I. What’s the use?: Searching for catalog user tasks beyond finding, identifying, selecting, and obtaining (Presenter: Marty Kurth) The prospect of the widespread exposure of library bibliographic data on the open web offers librarians the opportunity to question our assumptions about how users typically engage those data.

The ALCTS Heads of Cataloging Interest Group invites you to join our two distinguished speakers in Las Vegas. We continue our theme from the last Midwinter Meetings discussing how to “transform” the areas of cataloging and metadata. I. What’s the use?: Searching for catalog user tasks beyond finding, identifying, selecting, and obtaining (Presenter: Marty Kurth) The prospect of the widespread exposure of library bibliographic data on the open web offers librarians the opportunity to question our assumptions about how users typically engage those data. In this presentation, Marty Kurth will present preliminary findings from his examination of the generic tasks of library catalog users defined in Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records in light of both the migration of bibliographic data to the web and of the web’s collaborative capabilities. Speaker’s Bio: Marty Kurth is the Director of Knowledge Access and Resource Management Services at the NYU Division of Libraries. He has worked in academic libraries since 1988 and at NYU since 2010. Marty’s research interests concern the future of the library catalog and the role of library bibliographic data in how people seek and share information on the web. II. Local problems, shared solutions (Presenter: Chia Naun Chew) A theme that came out of a recent Cornell management retreat was that it was in our interests to seek global solutions to local problems wherever possible. Collaboration, however, can mean a number of quite different things. This talk will consider the different forces that come into play when libraries undertake shared efforts. Speakers’ Bio: Chew Chiat Naun is Director, Cataloging & Metadata Services at Cornell University Library. He is a graduate of Monash University in Melbourne, Australia, and has held cataloguing positions there and at the University of Illinois and the University of Minnesota. He has been active in ALCTS and PCC. 

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Event Heads of Cataloging Interest Group

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Tue, Jan 7, 2014 at 07:22 pm

We have two fabulous speakers who will discuss their efforts to transform their catalog departments beyond the traditional boundaries and successfully implement innovative changes.

I. Living Up to One’s Digital Potential in a Traditional Cataloging Unit (Presenter: John Riemer)

We have two fabulous speakers who will discuss their efforts to transform their catalog departments beyond the traditional boundaries and successfully implement innovative changes.

I. Living Up to One’s Digital Potential in a Traditional Cataloging Unit (Presenter: John Riemer)

Speaking from lengthy personal experience, John Riemer is going to address how a traditional cataloging unit can actively enter the digital age and successfully undertake new roles for catalogers and metadata. Along the way he will reflect on the reasons why catalogers should want to do this and on what some of the rewards have been.

Currently the Head of the UCLA Library Cataloging & Metadata Center since 2000, John Riemer previously worked as Digital Cataloging Coordinator for the Digital Library of Georgia (1999- 2000) and led serials cataloging for over 15 years at University of Georgia. In 2010/2011 he was Chair of the Program for Cooperative Cataloging, serving a 2009-2012 elected term on the PCC Policy Committee. During this time he has led an effort to expand the PCC’s scope to include both traditional MARC/AACR2 cataloging and digital library project metadata/new metadata roles. He is a member of the OCLC Research Library Partners Metadata Managers Focus Group. He serves as a member of the Cataloging & Classification Quarterly Editorial Board and writes guest columns for Technicalities. Among his recent publications is “The Expansion of Cataloging to Cover the Digital Object Landscape” (CCQ, 2010)

II. Evolution, Revolution, Transfiguration (Presenter: Philip Schreur)
From the massive redesign of its Technical Services in 1996, the remodeling of its Catalog Department in 1999 and its “elimination” in 2008, the transition to RDA in 2009, and its recent postings for a Linked Data Technologist and a Metadata Strategist in 2013, the Stanford University Library’s Metadata Department has undergone explosive, directed evolution for the past 16 years. Each step has been driven by its own advance in technology and business need. The presentation will focus on the drivers for these changes and the innovations developed to support them. Last will be a look to the future and the unprecedented pressures and opportunities that are coalescing to push us from revolution to transfiguration.
Philip Schreur received his PhD in Musicology from Stanford University in 1987 and his Masters in Library and Information Science from the University of California Berkeley in 1988. He is currently the Head of the Metadata Department at Stanford University where he serves as Metadata Strategist and has strong interests in the automatic generation of descriptive and controlled metadata stemming from his work as Knowledge System Developer for HighWire Press (2000-2005). He served as chair of the Policy Committee for the Program for Cooperative Cataloging from 2012-2013 focusing attention on RDA implementation and authorities in a non-MARC environment. His recent article “The Academy Unbound: Linked Data as Revolution” (LRTS 2012) won Best of LRTS award. He is part of a linked-data skunkworks group at Stanford University investigating the digital repository as database of record, authority management through linked data, ontology mapping, and BIBFRAME implementation.

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Event Heads of Cataloging Departments Interest Group

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Fri, Jun 21, 2013 at 12:34 pm

Please join the Heads of Cataloging Interest Group as we complete our series on assessment for cataloging operations.  Over the course of two previous meetings, we have heard an introduction to assessment as well as learned about specific examples of assessment programs, and this series will conclude by looking towards the future for assessment in cataloging.  The session will include presentations from two speakers, detailed below, as well as ample opportunity for discussion.

 

Robert Wolven, Columbia University

Please join the Heads of Cataloging Interest Group as we complete our series on assessment for cataloging operations.  Over the course of two previous meetings, we have heard an introduction to assessment as well as learned about specific examples of assessment programs, and this series will conclude by looking towards the future for assessment in cataloging.  The session will include presentations from two speakers, detailed below, as well as ample opportunity for discussion.

 

Robert Wolven, Columbia University

Comparing Assessment Across Institutions: An Administrator’s Perspective

Under the rubric of 2CUL, the libraries of Columbia and Cornell universities have been working to achieve a deep integration of their technical services operations.  Detailed comparison of policies, procedures, and workflows reveals both similarities and differences in the way cataloging is assessed.  Sometimes this assessment is explicit, but often it's implicit in institutional culture and mindset, driven by actors and factors external to technical services.  Achieving true integration will mean recognizing and reconciling the ways we evaluate cataloging services and measure success.

 

Ted Fons, OCLC

With the advent of new metadata initiatives, such as BIBFRAME, will we need to rethink current assessment plans?  Exploring current measures and comparing them against the objectives of such new initiatives may point to a need for future shifts in practice. 

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Discusses policy, implementation, quality control of bibliographic and authority records, work flow, personnel including supervision, motivation and other issues of concern to the members of the group. Provides a forum for discussing techniques and exchanging information.

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