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Discussion ALA Annual 2017 Meeting Minutes- ALCTS PARS Preservation Metadata IG

by Jennifer Mullins on Mon, Jul 17, 2017 at 10:59 am

Meeting Minutes

18 Attendees

Welcome and Business Meeting: No new ideas brought to the table for changes to the charge or idea for the next year’s session.

Presentation 1: Overview of the PEGI Project and Preservation Metadata

  • There is a growing concern about the national need to mitigate the loss of electronic government information.

Meeting Minutes

18 Attendees

Welcome and Business Meeting: No new ideas brought to the table for changes to the charge or idea for the next year’s session.

Presentation 1: Overview of the PEGI Project and Preservation Metadata

  • There is a growing concern about the national need to mitigate the loss of electronic government information.

  • Long standing structure for print, much less for electronic information.

  • University of North Texas engaged with Yale and LoC in a web archiving project. Capture .gov sites and more every four years (after a president's term). Large amounts of information disappears when this happens. (End of Term Web Archive)

  • PEGI is a effort of libraries, federal agencies and nonprofits to raise awareness around electronic records.

  • There is a steering committee in place and it is now focused on an assessment of the landscape of government records.

  • Phase 1 - Engage with agencies: how they create disseminate and preserve information  leading to a report and then possibly submission to national forums

  • The challenge is to categorize and make sense of large dumps of data after it has been gathered. It is not that hard to gather the WARCs and other documents. Organizing and maintaining data from databases has been the problem.

  • They have thought about crowdsourcing the metadata creation and curation for this project.

  • Government Printing Office is mandated to catalog and index everything the government publications. Documents being published online has created a lot of fugitive documents that the office is unaware of.

Q/A: What kind of machine readable techniques have been used to categorize the data? This has been attempted by reading the PDFs that were crawled, but the information has been very inconsistent.

https://www.crl.edu/preservation-electronic-government-information-pegi

 

Presentation 2: Making the Link: Preservation metadata for analog and digital materials

  • Rare book conservators perspective: the presentations from this group seemed to focus on the metadata for digital objects with much less on physical objects.

  • Preservation for analog objects is typically saved for rare or unique items. Contains: condition, treatments, photography of items, etc.

  • This data tends to be tailored to other professionals and scholars researching the items.

  • Storing this data has been a challenge. MARC fields have been used, "preservation action" in ASPACE, inhouse databases and paper files.

  • There are some tools underdevelopment to track information but do not link to library catalogs.

  • Digital objects have three types of metadata: descriptive, structural and administrative

  • Information about an object that has been digitized may contain in many formats in many places.

  • Major Point: Both the analog and digital sides are asking similar questions as far as managing data. How do we bring the data being tracked together?

Q/A: This has been a challenge and it is good that this was brought up and this should be a proposed as something to talk about again next year.

 Slides available at: http://ir.uiowa.edu/lib_pubs/210/

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Discussion ALCTS PARS Preservation Metadata IG seeks new co-chair

by Jennifer Mullins on Wed, May 31, 2017 at 08:28 am

The ALCTS PARS Preservation Metadata Interest Group seeks a new co-chair to serve a 2-year term from July 2017 through June 2019. For the first year the incoming co-chair will serve alongside current co-chair Dan Johnson. Co-chairs are responsible for planning programming on behalf of the Interest Group at the ALA Annual Conference and Midwinter Meeting, reporting to the ALCTS PARS Executive Committee on programs, and submitting meeting minutes to ALA Connect.

The ALCTS PARS Preservation Metadata Interest Group seeks a new co-chair to serve a 2-year term from July 2017 through June 2019. For the first year the incoming co-chair will serve alongside current co-chair Dan Johnson. Co-chairs are responsible for planning programming on behalf of the Interest Group at the ALA Annual Conference and Midwinter Meeting, reporting to the ALCTS PARS Executive Committee on programs, and submitting meeting minutes to ALA Connect.

The charge of the ALCTS PARS Preservation Metadata Interest Group is to “To discuss the bibliographic control and intellectual access to preserved and reformatted materials.” More information about the Interest Group, including meeting minutes, can be found at http://www.ala.org/alcts/mgrps/pars/grps/ats-parigia.

If you are interested in volunteering to serve as co-chair, please contact Dan Johnson (daniel-h-johnson@uiowa.edu) and Jenny Mullins (Jennifer.L.Mullins@dartmouth.edu) by June 15th to express interest.

ALCTS PARS Preservation Metadata Interest Group Co-Chairs:

Daniel Johnson Preservation Metadata IG Co-Chair (2016-2018)

Digital Preservation Librarian

University of Iowa

daniel-h-johnson@uiowa.edu

 Jenny Mullins, Preservation Metadata IG Co-Chair (2015-2017)

Digital Preservation Librarian

Dartmouth College Library

Jennifer.L.Mullins@dartmouth.edu

 

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Discussion ALCTS PARS Preservation Metadata IG at ALA Annual 2017

by Jennifer Mullins on Fri, May 26, 2017 at 10:57 am

Please join us for the ALCTS PARS Preservation Metadata Interest Group Meeting at ALA Annual 2017 in Chicago. Our program will begin with a short business meeting and the election of an incoming co-chair.

 

Date: Saturday, June 24, 2017

Time: 3:00–4:00 p.m.

Location: McCormick Place, W190b

Please join us for the ALCTS PARS Preservation Metadata Interest Group Meeting at ALA Annual 2017 in Chicago. Our program will begin with a short business meeting and the election of an incoming co-chair.

 

Date: Saturday, June 24, 2017

Time: 3:00–4:00 p.m.

Location: McCormick Place, W190b

Add this meeting to your schedule: https://www.eventscribe.com/2017/ALA-Annual/fsPopup.asp?Mode=presInfo&Pr...

 

Overview of the PEGI Project and Preservation Metadata

Martin Halbert, Dean of Libraries, University of North Texas

Robbie Sittel, Eagle Commons Library Head and Government Information Librarian, University of North Texas

David Walls, Preservation Librarian, US Government Printing Office

Librarians, technologists, and other information professionals from the Center for Research Libraries, the Government Publishing Office (GPO), the University of North Texas, the University of California at Santa Barbara, the University of Missouri, University of North Carolina at Greensboro and Stanford University are undertaking a two year project to address national concerns regarding the preservation of electronic government information (PEGI) by cultural memory organizations for long term use by the citizens of the United States. The PEGI project has been informed by a series of meetings between university librarians, information professionals, and representatives of federal agencies, including the Government Publishing Office and the National Archives and Records Administration. The focus of the PEGI proposal is at-risk government digital information of long term historical significance.  For more details, see: https://www.crl.edu/preservation-electronic-government-information-pegi

 

Making the Link: Preservation metadata for analog and digital materials

Brenna Campbell, Rare Books Conservator, Princeton University

Bethany Davis, Digital Processing Coordinator Librarian, University of Iowa

In recent years, the content of the Preservation Metadata Interest Group’s meetings has focused on questions surrounding preservation metadata for a wide array of digital objects. Nevertheless, preserved materials also exist in a variety of analog formats. This presentation will explore the assumptions underlying the observed digital focus of the interest group and discuss areas of overlap and difference between preservation metadata for digital and analog objects. It will also briefly summarize work to date on efforts to link preservation metadata for analog objects (also called conservation documentation) to existing bibliographic records and propose a new, closer alliance between professionals tasked with the preservation of digital and analog collections.

 

We hope to see you there!

 

Daniel Johnson Preservation Metadata IG Co-Chair (2016-2018)

Digital Preservation Librarian

University of Iowa

daniel-h-johnson@uiowa.edu

 

Jenny Mullins, Preservation Metadata IG Co-Chair (2015-2017)

Interim Head of Preservation Services

Digital Preservation Librarian

Dartmouth College Library

Jennifer.L.Mullins@dartmouth.edu

 

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Discussion 2016 ALA Annual Conference Preservation Metadata Interest Group (PM IG) Meeting Minutes

by Drew Krewer (non-member) on Fri, Jul 1, 2016 at 03:29 pm

The Preservation Metadata Interest Group met during the 2016 ALA Annual Conference on Saturday, June 25, with 41 people in attendance. During a brief business meeting, the current co-chairs announced that Daniel Johnson (Digital Preservation Librarian, University of Iowa Libraries) would be serving as incoming co-chair from July 2016 - June 2018, replacing Drew Krewer as he rotates off leadership. A program followed which focused on current approaches to implementing preservation metadata. The program included two presentations:

The Preservation Metadata Interest Group met during the 2016 ALA Annual Conference on Saturday, June 25, with 41 people in attendance. During a brief business meeting, the current co-chairs announced that Daniel Johnson (Digital Preservation Librarian, University of Iowa Libraries) would be serving as incoming co-chair from July 2016 - June 2018, replacing Drew Krewer as he rotates off leadership. A program followed which focused on current approaches to implementing preservation metadata. The program included two presentations:

"The PREMIS of our not so SIMP-le story: Implementing preservation metadata using homegrown and vendor solutions" by Jeremy Myntti (Head of Digital Library Services, University of Utah) and Tawnya Keller (Interim Assistant Head, Digital Preservation, University of Utah)

The University of Utah has implemented Ex Libris' Rosetta Digital Preservation System for the long-term preservation of digital assets. A large piece of this implementation has included the development of the SIMP Tool (Submission Information and Metadata Packaging Tool) used to streamline workflows from the digitization process to metadata creation to ingestion into both the digital asset management system and the digital preservation system. Intellectual Entities (IEs) have descriptive metadata attached to items in the SIMP Tool as well as minimal preservation metadata. When IEs are ingested into Rosetta from the SIMP Tool, Rosetta automates a majority of the preservation metadata and maintains this alongside the preservation master files. University of Utah is working towards meeting the NDSA digital preservation level 4 guideline which includes full preservation metadata in addition to the descriptive and technical metadata that is already being included in Rose tta. This presentation will include details about the system that has been developed and how it is being used in conjunction with Rosetta to preserve digital assets.

"Preservation planning in the consortial context: Updates from the DPN Preservation Metadata Standards Working Group" by Moriah Caruso (Preservation Librarian, University of Washington), Drew Krewer (Digitization Services Coordinator, University of Houston), Jennifer Mullins (Digital Preservation Librarian, Dartmouth College), and Liz Woolcott (Head of Cataloging and Metadata Services, Utah State University)

The Preservation Metadata Standards working group for the Digital Preservation Network (DPN) was charged to “outline the metadata standards that DPN will follow for digital preservation.” In this talk, the group will describe our work to date, share recommended baseline metadata for DPN deposit, and discuss next steps.

Slides are available below.

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Discussion ALCTS PARS Preservation Metadata IG at ALA Annual 2016

by Drew Krewer (non-member) on Mon, Jun 6, 2016 at 11:29 am

Please join us for the ALCTS PARS Preservation Metadata Interest Group Meeting at ALA Annual 2016 in Orlando. Our program will begin with a short business meeting and the election of an incoming co-chair. The session will focus on current approaches to implementing preservation metadata.

 

Date: Saturday, June 25, 2016

Time: 3:00–4:00 p.m.

Location: Orange County Convention Center, W107

Please join us for the ALCTS PARS Preservation Metadata Interest Group Meeting at ALA Annual 2016 in Orlando. Our program will begin with a short business meeting and the election of an incoming co-chair. The session will focus on current approaches to implementing preservation metadata.

 

Date: Saturday, June 25, 2016

Time: 3:00–4:00 p.m.

Location: Orange County Convention Center, W107

Add this meeting to your schedule: http://www.eventscribe.com/2016/ala-annual/fsPopup.asp?Mode=presInfo&PresentationID=143222#

 

The PREMIS of our not so SIMP-le story: Implementing preservation metadata using homegrown and vendor solutions

Jeremy Myntti, Head of Digital Library Services, University of Utah

Tawnya Keller, Interim Assistant Head, Digital Preservation, University of Utah

 

The University of Utah has implemented Ex Libris' Rosetta Digital Preservation System for the long-term preservation of our digital assets. A large piece of this implementation has included the development of the SIMP Tool (Submission Information and Metadata Packaging Tool) used to streamline workflows from the digitization process to metadata creation to ingestion into our digital asset management system and digital preservation system. Intellectual Entities (IEs) have descriptive metadata attached to items in the SIMP Tool as well as minimal preservation metadata. When IEs are ingested into Rosetta from the SIMP Tool, Rosetta automates a majority of the preservation metadata and maintains this alongside the preservation master files. We are working towards meeting the NDSA digital preservation level 4 guideline which includes full preservation metadata in addition to the descriptive and technical metadata that we are already including in Rosetta. This presentation will include details about the system that we have developed and how it is being using in conjunction with Rosetta to preserve our digital assets.

 

Preservation planning in the consortial context: Updates from the DPN Preservation Metadata Standards Working Group

Moriah Caruso, Preservation Librarian, University of Washington

Drew Krewer, Digitization Services Coordinator, University of Houston

Jennifer Mullins, Digital Preservation Librarian, Dartmouth College

Liz Woolcott, Head of Cataloging and Metadata Services, Utah State University

 

The Preservation Metadata Standards working group for the Digital Preservation Network (DPN) was charged to “outline the metadata standards that DPN will follow for digital preservation.” In this talk, we will describe our work to date, share our recommended baseline metadata for DPN deposit, and discuss next steps.

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Discussion 2015 ALA Annual Conference Preservation Metadata Interest Group (PM IG) Meeting Minutes

by Chelcie Rowell on Thu, Aug 6, 2015 at 03:55 pm

During the 2015 ALA Annual Conference, the Preservation Metadata Interest Group met on June 27, 2015 from 3:00–4:00 p.m. in Room 2008 (W) of the Moscone Convention Center. 40 people attended.

During the 2015 ALA Annual Conference, the Preservation Metadata Interest Group met on June 27, 2015 from 3:00–4:00 p.m. in Room 2008 (W) of the Moscone Convention Center. 40 people attended.

An election was held to determine who would serve as co-chair once Chelcie Rowell rolls off. The candidates were Daniel Johnson (Digital Preservation Librarian at University of Iowa Libraries) and Jenny Mullins (Digital Preservation Librarian at Dartmouth College Library). Jenny Mullins was elected to serve as co-chair from July 2015–June 2017.

The session focused on pragmatic implementations of preservation metadata for two tricky content types, web archives and digital media art objects.

Don't WARC Away: Preservation Metadata for Web Archives
Maria LaCalle, Web Archivist, Internet Archive
Jefferson Bailey, Director of Web Archiving Programs, Internet Archive

As more institutions include web archives in their digital collections, creating preservation metadata to support the long term stewardship of these files is a newly emerging challenge. Archive-It, a web archiving service of the Internet Archive, works with over 360 partner institutions across the globe, providing tools for harvesting, managing, and accessing archived web content. This talk will explore how Archive-It partners incorporate preservation metadata into their web archiving programs, the development of tools and workflows to support this work, and the unique challenges web archives present to digital preservation metadata.

In the Service of Art: Metadata for Preservation of Digital Artworks
Jason Kovari, Head of Metadata Services, Cornell University

In February 2013, the Rose Goldsen Archive of New Media Art, part of Cornell University Library’s Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, received a $300,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to develop PAFDAO (Preservation and Access Frameworks for Complex Digital Media Art Objects). PAFDAO’s test collection includes more than 300 interactive born-digital artworks created for CD-ROM, DVD-ROM, and web distribution, many of which date back to the early 1990s. Though vitally important to understanding the development of media art and aesthetics over the past two decades, these materials are at serious risk of degradation and are unreadable without obsolete computers and software. This talk will reference the larger workflow of the project and how metadata decisions were made in order to ensure long-term preservation and use of these complex digital media art objects, most of which contain many elaborate interdependencies.

Slides are available below.

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Discussion ALCTS ALA Annual Virtual Preconference "Planning for the Evolving Role of Metadata Services"

by Drew Krewer (non-member) on Wed, May 6, 2015 at 12:32 pm

The ALCTS Metadata Interest Group and the ALCTS PARS Preservation Metadata Interest Group invite you to join us for the ALCTS ALA Annual Virtual Preconference “Planning for the Evolving Role of Metadata Services.”  The preconference will feature three days of exploring the expansion of metadata services, including:

The ALCTS Metadata Interest Group and the ALCTS PARS Preservation Metadata Interest Group invite you to join us for the ALCTS ALA Annual Virtual Preconference “Planning for the Evolving Role of Metadata Services.”  The preconference will feature three days of exploring the expansion of metadata services, including:

Session 1: Metadata Services for Research Data Management (June 2)

  • Research Data Support at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG): a Metadata Perspective
    • Anna Craft, Metadata Cataloger at UNCG
  • Using DDI Metadata to Support Research Data Management
    • Jared Lyle, Director of Curation Services, ICPSR
  • Evolving Workflows for Metadata Ingest at The UC San Diego Library
    • Arwen Hutt, Metadata Librarian, UC San Diego
  • Integrating New Services into Existing Metadata Workflows
    • Nathan B. Putnam and Bria L. Parker, Metadata Services, University of Maryland
  • Special Collections, Special Thesauri: Managing and Publishing Local Vocabularies with TemaTres
    • Allison Jai O'Dell, Special Collections Cataloging & Metadata Librarian, University of Miami Libraries
  • Encoded Archival Context-Corporate Bodies, Persons, and Families and Washingtoniana Collections: A Pilot Project at the George Washington University Libraries
    • Dan Tam Do, Metadata Services Managers, George Washington University Libraries

Session 2: Assessing Metadata Staffing and Workflows (June 3)

Session 3: Techniques and Technologies for Developing Local Controlled Vocabularies (June 4)

 

When: June 2-4, 2015

 

Time :  2:00pm (EDT)

1:00pm (CDT)

12:00pm (MDT)

11:00am (PDT)

 

Length: 90 minutes

 

Event webpage (including session details and registration information): http://www.ala.org/alcts/confevents/upcoming/webinar/060215

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Discussion 2013 ALA Annual Intellectual Access to Preservation Metadata Interest Group (IAPM-IG) Meeting Minutes

by Shawn Averkamp on Fri, Jul 12, 2013 at 12:30 pm

The Intellectual Access to Preservation Metadata Interest Group met June 29 from 3-4pm at the McCormick Place Convention Center, room N135, Chicago, IL . 76 people attended.

Business meeting announcements:

The Intellectual Access to Preservation Metadata Interest Group met June 29 from 3-4pm at the McCormick Place Convention Center, room N135, Chicago, IL . 76 people attended.

Business meeting announcements:

--Outgoing co-chair, Shawn Averkamp, welcomed incoming co-chair, Chelcie Rowell. In August 2013, Chelcie Rowell will graduate from the School of Information and Library Science at UNC-Chapel and will begin as the Digital Initiatives Librarian at the Z. Smith Reynolds Library of Wake Forest University. Chelcie will begin her two-year term with returning co-chair, Sarah Potvin.

--Shawn made a call for future meeting topics. Suggestions can be submitted to the co-chairs or through ALAConnect.

The business meeting was followed by two presentations on preservation metadata in repositories:

PREMIS: to Be or Not To Be in My METS

Jennifer Eustis (Catalog/Metadata Librarian, University of Connecticut Libraries) and David Lowe (Preservation and Data Management Services Librarian, University of Connecticut Libraries) discussed the University of Connecticut Libraries’ process of selecting and implementing a Fedora repository and the issues they faced in integrating preservation metadata, towards TRAC compliance. In 2011,UConn created a working group to investigate alternatives to current repositories that would incorporate a more consistent preservation mission. After selecting Fedora, the group set out to develop a content model and design their METS profile. They determined the minimum metadata requirements—an “Uberset”—and assigned elements from this set to the appropriate split content levels—grouping, container, and media objects. This "atomistic" content model enabled metadata to be split across the three levels. The repository currently supports the recording of ingestion events in PREMIS.

During the process of integrating METS and PREMIS for their Fedora repository, the group encountered a number of issues, including incompatibility with Islandora (the chosen administrative model and presentation layer), difficulty retrieving consistent technical metadata from Archivematica, and problems getting PREMIS into the METS data stream. To remedy these issues, they decided to build their own administrative module (reserving Islandora for the presentation layer only) and to move away from the METS Uberset, towards a more modular solution for packaging and reusing preservation metadata. Next steps will include refining specifications for their metadata modules, determining how to handle PREMIS beyond ingest events, and exploring the incorporation of linked open data.

The Purdue University Research Repository: HUBzero Customization For Dataset Publication And Digital Preservation

Amy Barton (Metadata Specialist and Assistant Professor of Library Science, Purdue University Library) and Carly Dearborn (Digital Preservation and Electronic Records Archivist, Purdue University Library) presented on work done with Neal Harmeyer (Digital Archivist, Purdue University Library). Barton and Dearborn provided an overview of Purdue University’s research repository, PURR, and the metadata they collect and generate to support the long-term preservation of research datasets. 

PURR is an instance of HUBzero, an open source LAMP-based platform with Joomla! content management system. Developed at Purdue, PURR was customized for data stewardship, including workflows for curation, publication, dissemination, and preservation of datasets. The project involves a team from the Libraries and serves as a collaborative effort involving the Libraries, Information Technology at Purdue, and the Office of the Vice President for Research.  

Using TRAC as their guide, the group collaboratively developed mission statements, policies, job descriptions, and business plans. They decided to commit to preservation of all deposits for ten years, after which time content is subject to Libraries’ selection criteria for further retention. PURR accepts all file formats but recommends sustainable format solutions. Following the OAIS model, content producers submit content (SIP) and the content information is bundled together with Bagit (AIP). Because PURR uncompresses all files for the AIP, the DIP is derived from the original SIP. 

PURR metadata incurs the weaving together of standards for preservation. METS is used as the wrapper to package metadata; dcterms is used for descriptive metadata; MODS, to designate dataset ownership and access condition for digital provenance; and PREMIS, for preservation metadata (including technical, rights, and digital provenance metadata). PURR currently records validation, ingestion, and capture events in PREMIS. In addition to capturing preservation events, PURR records the significant properties of datasets, determined through consultation with the content producers, which will aid in future file format migration. Subject specialists check submissions and add keywords to datasets. The presenters concluded with a walkthrough of a dataset submission.

After presentations concluded, speakers took questions from the audience. Attendees asked about Purdue's practice of deriving DIPs from SIPs rather than AIPs, questioned whether Dublin Core was sufficient for describing data, and requested further information about file formats received and migrated. They further asked about the appraisal process that could result in data being deaccessioned after ten years. Both sets of speakers responded to a question about data ownership and questions of terminology and policy.

Presentation slides are available below.

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Discussion ALCTS/PARS Intellectual Access to Preservation Metadata Interest Group at ALA Annual 2013

by Sarah E. H. Potvin on Fri, Jun 7, 2013 at 09:53 am

ALCTS PARS Intellectual Access to Preservation Metadata Interest Group

Saturday, June 29, 3-4PM

McCormick Place Convention Center, Room N135

Topic: Building Out Preservation Metadata in Digital Repositories

Please join us for the ALCTS PARS Intellectual Access to Preservation Metadata Interest Group meeting, with two presentations on preservation metadata development in digital and research data repositories. 

 

PREMIS: To Be or Not To Be in My METS

ALCTS PARS Intellectual Access to Preservation Metadata Interest Group

Saturday, June 29, 3-4PM

McCormick Place Convention Center, Room N135

Topic: Building Out Preservation Metadata in Digital Repositories

Please join us for the ALCTS PARS Intellectual Access to Preservation Metadata Interest Group meeting, with two presentations on preservation metadata development in digital and research data repositories. 

 

PREMIS: To Be or Not To Be in My METS

Jennifer Eustis, Catalog/Metadata Librarian

David Lowe, Preservation and Data Management Services Librarian

University of Connecticut Libraries

Abstract

The University of Connecticut Libraries is currently building a Fedora digital repository. At the beginning of this project, we investigated the viability of using Islandora to meet our needs of an administration module on top of Fedora. As our analysis came to end, we found that Islandora meets only some of our needs. On the one hand, Islandora is convenient as an already existing solution with a robust user community. Islandora metadata forms also seamlessly create and update the Dublin Core (DC) and Metadata Object Description Schema (MODS) data streams in Fedora Digital Objects. On the other hand, we want a more tailored management system than Islandora can deliver for our digital objects. More importantly, we are striving for a TRAC compliant system that implements PREMIS repository and also facilitates the automated collection of provenance metadata. Because of these concerns, we decided to rely on Islandora in the short term as a presentation layer and, at the same time, find ways to structure incoming metadata that included PREMIS. These decisions led us to what we refer to as our METS Uberset document. Essentially, this METS Uberset document is used to collocate and normalize incoming descriptive, rights, technical and preservation metadata in a METS document to create the individual data streams for each type of metadata. In this presentation, I will describe the process of how the METS Uberset document came to be and its various incarnations including a discussion on the role of PREMIS, its role in the automated collection of data, and the lessons still being learned.

The Purdue University Research Repository: HUBzero customization for dataset publication and digital preservation

Amy Barton, Metadata Specialist and Assistant Professor of Library Science [presenter]

Neal Harmeyer, Digital Archivist

Carly Dearborn, Digital Preservation and Electronic Records Archivist

Purdue University Libraries 

Abstract

In 2011, prompted by the National Science Foundation’s mandate to include a data management plan in grant applications, a steering committee made up of Purdue’s Dean of Libraries, the Vice President of Information Technology, and Vice President for Research tasked Purdue University Libraries and Purdue University Information Technology with the development of the Purdue University Research Repository (PURR). PURR provides an online, collaborative project space and data-sharing platform to support the data management needs of Purdue researchers and collaborators. Within PURR a publication process makes research results, or datasets, publicly available. Each published dataset is assigned a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) to support discoverability and data citation.

PURR is a customized instance of HUBzero®, an open source software platform that supports scientific discovery, learning, and collaboration. HUBzero was a research project funded by the United States National Science Foundation (NSF) and is a product of the Network for Computational Nanotechnology (NCN), a multi-university initiative of eight member institutions. PURR is only one instance of a HUBzero’s customization; versions have been implemented in many disciplines nation-wide.

PURR maintains the core functionality of HUBzero, but has been modified to publish datasets and to support their preservation. Long-term access to published data is an essential component of PURR services and Purdue University Libraries’ mission.  Preservation in PURR is not only vital to the Purdue University research community, but to the larger digital preservation issues surrounding dynamic datasets and their long-term reuse.

This case study will discuss the creation of robust preservation functionality within PURR. In particular, we will discuss digital preservation policies, the implementation of the OAIS model, and the weaving of various metadata standards via a dynamic, programmatic process for PURR’s unique digital content.

The presentations will be preceded by a brief business meeting.

Shawn Averkamp

Sarah Potvin

Chairs, ALCTS PARS Intellectual Access to Preservation Metadata Interest Group 

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Discussion 2013 ALA Midwinter Intellectual Access to Preservation Metadata Interest Group (IAPM-IG) Meeting Minutes

by Sarah E. H. Potvin on Thu, Feb 7, 2013 at 02:58 pm

The IAPM IG met on Saturday, January 26, 2013, 3-4PM, at ALA Midwinter in Seattle.

-The program opened with a brief business meeting, during which Shawn announced that we were accepting proposals for programming for the upcoming Annual meeting. Shawn also announced that, as her term as co-chair would be ending with Annual, anyone interested in becoming an IAPM co-chair should contact us.

-Having concluded the business meeting, Sarah made a brief announcement about a DSpace metadata development project.

The IAPM IG met on Saturday, January 26, 2013, 3-4PM, at ALA Midwinter in Seattle.

-The program opened with a brief business meeting, during which Shawn announced that we were accepting proposals for programming for the upcoming Annual meeting. Shawn also announced that, as her term as co-chair would be ending with Annual, anyone interested in becoming an IAPM co-chair should contact us.

-Having concluded the business meeting, Sarah made a brief announcement about a DSpace metadata development project.

-Sarah then introduced the program speaker, Dr. Howard Besser. Dr. Besser is a Professor at New York University, where he directs the masters program in Moving Image Archiving and Preservation.

-Dr. Besser presented on “Archiving Media from the Occupy Movement: Trying to Involve Participants in Making their Creations More Preservable.”

Dr. Besser has made his presentation available online: http://besser.tsoa.nyu.edu/howard/Talks/12ala-occupy-seattle-outreach.pdf

The presentation addressed the work of Activist Archivists in trying to preserve media related to the Occupy Movement through engagement with its participants. Methods ranged from outreach activities (such as the creation of a "Why Archive" postcard and video employing language and principles important to movement members) to guidelines concerning file formats and metadata.

Besser opened with a broad discussion of tips for outreach to communities. He advised that those seeking to outreach should identify ways to meet the needs perceived by collection-holders (for example, someone with a large collection of digital photographs may not know they have a preservation problem but may be concerned about filenaming and storage). He emphasized that preservation outreach required a focus on content and metadata as well as rights, which might impede the preservation process.

Besser then introduced the Occupy Wall Street (OWS) Movement as a case study in outreach for digital preservation. Within six months after Occupy began, there were more than half a million photographs taken and contributed to Flickr with tags related to the Movement—a vast quantity of undifferentiated user-generated material. There is a need to find smart ways to harvest and analyze existing materials, which can be easily located on social networks, as well as to influence the behavior of those producing these materials. Besser’s prior work with InterPARES and the Preserving Digital Public Television Project confirm the need for early intervention in the lifecycle of digital object creation—preservation does not begin when the work enters the archive.

A group of students from the Moving Image Archiving and Preservation program at NYU formed Activist Archivists (AA) and worked to intervene and archive media from OWS. This included still images, video, and audio. The AA encountered particular challenges engaging OWS and its in-house Archives Working Group. Besser highlighted outreach materials, included postcards and a short film, created by AA to engage OWS in preservation and help ensure long-term use of media materials captured by OWS. AA also sought to compile best practices for OWS content creators, including research into laws about videotaping on the street and guidelines for uploading and depositing content with an archive.

Besser presented the results of a study of metadata loss performed by AA, which tested what metadata was retained or stripped out and how files were affected when uploaded to various social media and streaming services, including YouTube, Internet Archive, and Vimeo. Also noted were user agreement restrictions that prevented the download of videos from YouTube.

Intervention by AA resulted in the streaming recordings of OWS being captured on magnetic media for storage (AA then cataloged and enhanced metadata), the negotiation of a CC-licensed deposit agreement with NYU Library, and established methods for recording regular OWS Think Tank meetings.

The floor was then opened to questions. Attendees asked about archiving Tweets, which social media sites claim ownership of materials or apply non-exclusive licenses, and how devices and apps mangle metadata.

 

 

 

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Coordinates section activities related to managing the preservation of library and archival materials.

Co-chairs:

Chelcie Juliet Rowell, Digital Initiatives Librarian at Wake Forest University

Drew Krewer, Digitization Operations Librarian at University of Houston

Subscribe to ALCTS PARS Preservation Metadata Interest Group