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Discussion Libraries Foster Community Engagement MIG Meeting, Sunday, January 10, 8:30 am, BCEC 157C

by Nancy Kranich on Wed, Jan 6, 2016 at 02:59 am

Libraries Foster Community Engagement

Membership Initiative Group  

2016 ALA Midwinter Conference – Boston, MA

Sunday, January 10, 8:30 - 10:00 am

Boston Convention Center 157C

 

  AGENDA

Libraries Foster Community Engagement

Membership Initiative Group  

2016 ALA Midwinter Conference – Boston, MA

Sunday, January 10, 8:30 - 10:00 am

Boston Convention Center 157C

 

  AGENDA

  1. Harwood Institute,/ALA Partnership Community of Practice—LTC Library Innovators Cohort funded by the Gates Foundation; and link to new Libraries Transform Communities Resources
  2. Libraries Learning Research Exchange with the Kettering Foundation around the Kettering 6 Democratic Practices
  3. Community/Civic Engagement Activities Around the Country

(Send Other Suggestions to Nancy Kranich nancy.kranich@rutgers.edu)

Join Us. Bring Your Colleagues

 

Related Meetings of Interest

 

  • Saturday, Sunday, Monday, 8:30 am, 10:30 am; 1:00 pm; 3:00 pm Kitchen Table Community Conversations,  Westin Adams Room  (1½ hour conversations). Click on to facilitate, record, and/or join the conversations.

 

Follow the ALA Center for Civic Life

Blog: http://discuss.ala.org/civicengagement/

ALA Connect: http://connect.ala.org/node/64933

Subscribe to ALA's Civic Engagement listserv: 

Go to: http://lists.ala.org/sympa

            Search for "deliberate" 

            Click on "deliberate@lists.ala.org"

            Click on "Subscribe" 

Meet with colleagues at the ALA Libraries Foster Community Engagement Membership Initiative Group (MIG) at ALA conferences

Subscribe to Programming Librarian: http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/get-our-enewsletter

Learn to convene and moderate deliberative forums at: http://www.programminglibrarian.org/find?keys=%22center+for+civic+life%22

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Discussion Museums and Libraries Step-Up Efforts to Tackle Economic Distress in Poor Communities, Says New Report from IMLS and LISC

by Nancy Kranich on Mon, Nov 9, 2015 at 02:12 pm

Museums and Libraries Step-Up Efforts to Tackle Economic Distress in Poor Communities, Says New Report from IMLS and LISC

Washington, DC— A new national report finds that many museums and libraries are leveraging their prominent local positions to help rebuild troubled neighborhoods, driving economic, educational and social efforts that help raise standards of living.

Museums and Libraries Step-Up Efforts to Tackle Economic Distress in Poor Communities, Says New Report from IMLS and LISC

Washington, DC— A new national report finds that many museums and libraries are leveraging their prominent local positions to help rebuild troubled neighborhoods, driving economic, educational and social efforts that help raise standards of living.

Museums, Libraries, and Comprehensive Initiatives: A First Look at Emerging Experienceis part of a collaborative research effort by the Institute of Museum and Library Services and the Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) examining the ways that museums and libraries are helping fuel successful comprehensive community revitalization efforts and offer best practices for other institutions to follow.

The findings will be used to launch discussions at a series of invitational community meetings this fall and winter in Walterboro, S.C.; Indianapolis, Ind.; Minneapolis–St. Paul, Minn.; Philadelphia, Pa.; and Oakland, Calif.

The report includes examples from nine different museum and library initiatives, including:

  • The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. The museum decided to expand into its existing neighborhood, the Mid-North neighborhood, rather than build new facilities downtown. After taking the lead on transportation enhancements and acquiring a brownfield site to create green space, the museum became a leader in a citywide development effort managed by LISC.

  • The Detroit Public Library. The Parkman Branch houses one of 10 learning labs in Detroit that connects adults who have limited literacy and math skills to career pathways. The branch participates in the Hope Village Initiative, a neighborhood network of nine institutions serving a 100-block area, by providing skills training programs, and it is part of a community referral program linking individuals to area agencies for assistance with healthcare, parenting, and tax preparation.

  • Colleton Museum & Farmers Market (Walterboro, S.C.). The museum expanded into an old remodeled grocery store at the edge of downtown and now administers a farmer’s market there. The new space doubles as a town hall and community center. By partnering with community organizations, the museum provides health education through cooking classes and the statewide Eat Smart, Move More program.

“Our nation’s libraries and museums have vast potential to develop the physical, social, and economic initiatives that are so necessary for comprehensive community revitalization efforts,” said IMLS Director Dr. Kathryn K. Matthew. “I’m proud that IMLS and LISC have collaborated to identify leading examples of this cross-sectoral work and that IMLS provides the funding to support this vital work.”

“Many libraries and museums have moved beyond their traditional roles and are now key partners helping long-distressed communities build stability and growth,” said Michael Rubinger, LISC president and CEO. “They are advocates, community planners and economic engines—recognizing the needs of residents and responding in ways that help drive lasting change.”

The full report (PDF) is available on the IMLS website and through LISC’s Institute for Comprehensive Community Development(link is external)

About the Institute of Museum and Library Services
The Institute of Museum and Library Services is the primary source of federal support for the nation’s 123,000 libraries(link is external) and 35,000 museums. Our mission is to inspire libraries and museums to advance innovation, lifelong learning, and cultural and civic engagement. Our grant making, policy development, and research help libraries and museums deliver valuable services that make it possible for communities and individuals to thrive. To learn more, visit www.imls.gov and follow us on Facebook(link is external) and Twitter(link is external).

About LISC
LISC equips struggling communities with the capital, program strategy, and know-how to become places where people can thrive. It combines corporate, government and philanthropic resources. Since 1980, LISC has invested $14.7 billion to build or rehab 330,000 affordable homes and apartments and develop 53 million square feet of retail, community and educational space. For more, visit www.lisc.org(link is external).

 

 

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Discussion New York Public Library Recruiting a Director of Community Library Partnerships

by Nancy Kranich on Sat, Oct 24, 2015 at 12:28 pm

Director of Community Library Partnerships       

New York Public Library,

New York, New York

Salary: Not Specified

Status: Full-time

Posted: 10/14/15

Deadline: 

Director of Community Library Partnerships

Director of Community Library Partnerships       

New York Public Library,

New York, New York

Salary: Not Specified

Status: Full-time

Posted: 10/14/15

Deadline: 

Director of Community Library Partnerships

For over one hundred years, The New York Public Library has been an icon of New York City and the world of public libraries: a unique combination of research and circulating services that provides books, rare materials, advice, and inspiration for anyone who walks through our doors. Our programmatic direction for the future builds on these strengths and further adapts them to our rapidly changing times. 

What we do, and will do even better, is connect people with collections, expertise, services, and programs that inspire and empower. 

The Director of Community Library Partnerships at the New York Public Library will  facilitate this connection and grow our local audiences.  Working collaboratively with stakeholders from across the Library, city agencies, and within local communities, the director will bring their programming and community engagement experience to this leadership role in helping our neighborhood libraries engage local communities around existing Library programs and partner to create new opportunities to meet the educational and learning needs of our city through our services, collections and spaces.  This role will identify and implement best practices that leverage and grow staff competencies in program outreach and program partnership-building, set benchmarks to increase usage of library programs, collections and services, and ensure our efforts are in alignment with the Library’s strategic direction.

This Director’s initial focus will be on early literacy and other educational initiatives, but will also facilitate effective and engaging program partnerships that support general lifelong learning.

Under the leadership of the Vice President for Library Services, this position will develop and lead a process intended to grow and sustain local engagement with branch programs, collections, services and spaces through coordinated outreach, branch staff outreach training, best practice benchmarking for our neighborhood libraries, and marketing.

For a detailed job description, please click on the link or go to http://www.nypl.org/careers.

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Discussion Reminder: Public Innovators Lab for Libraries: Oct. 14-16, 2015

by Sarah Ostman (staff) on Mon, Aug 3, 2015 at 09:41 am

Just a reminder that the 2015 Public Innovators Lab for Libraries, offered by ALA in partnership with The Harwood Institute for Public Innovation, is now open for registration. This year's training will be held October 14-16 in Detroit. Please join us!

At this 2.5-day training, you will learn about Harwood’s “turning outward” approach. Libraries across the country are using this method to:

Just a reminder that the 2015 Public Innovators Lab for Libraries, offered by ALA in partnership with The Harwood Institute for Public Innovation, is now open for registration. This year's training will be held October 14-16 in Detroit. Please join us!

At this 2.5-day training, you will learn about Harwood’s “turning outward” approach. Libraries across the country are using this method to:

  • lead conversations with community members to better understand the kind of community they want and the challenges they see;
  • bring stakeholders together to get past gridlock and work on issues that matter to people;
  • improve library programming to be more relevant and connected to the struggles people face; and
  • better connect with underserved and often invisible populations in communities.

Read more about how libraries are using Harwood’s approach:http://www.ala.org/transforminglibraries/libraries-transforming-communities/blog

Register for the 2015 Public Innovators Lab for Libraries: http://www.cvent.com/events/the-harwood-ala-public-innovators-lab-for-libraries/event-summary-ccaa319151c541a7b81cc9ec75579d23.aspx

 Press release about the 2015 Public Innovators Lab for Libraries: http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2015/07/ala-harwood-institute-announce-public-innovators-lab-libraries-community

 Feel free to contact me with questions. Thanks!

 

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Discussion ALA/Harwood Public Innovators Lab for Libraries: October 14-16, 2015

by Sarah Ostman (staff) on Wed, Jul 8, 2015 at 09:26 am

ALA and the Harwood Institute have just announced our 2015 Public Innovators Lab for Libraries. This year's training will be held in October in Detroit. Please join us!

Register online: http://www.cvent.com/events/the-harwood-ala-public-innovators-lab-for-li....

Feel free to email me with questions: sostman (at) ala (dot) org

Sarah Ostman, ALA Public Programs Office

*******

ALA and the Harwood Institute have just announced our 2015 Public Innovators Lab for Libraries. This year's training will be held in October in Detroit. Please join us!

Register online: http://www.cvent.com/events/the-harwood-ala-public-innovators-lab-for-li....

Feel free to email me with questions: sostman (at) ala (dot) org

Sarah Ostman, ALA Public Programs Office

*******

ALA, Harwood Institute announce Public Innovators Lab for Libraries community engagement training opportunity

http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2015/07/ala-harwood-institute-ann...

Join ALA and The Harwood Institute for Public Innovation for an intensive three-day training opportunity to help libraries strengthen their role as agents of positive change in their communities.   

The Public Innovators Lab for Libraries will be held Oct. 14 - 16 at the DoubleTree Detroit Downtown – Fort Shelby. Librarians, community partners and stakeholders in libraries of all types — public, academic, school and specialty libraries — are encouraged to register.

Through discussions, hands-on activities and collaborations with like-minded library professionals, participants will learn to:

  • tap libraries' natural values to contribute to the greater good and bring their communities together;
  • surface people’s shared aspirations for their communities through conversations and help bring them to life; and
  • use that knowledge to create programs and strategies to address challenges people care about and make the community stronger at the same time.

Participants must register online by Oct. 2. The cost is $1,495 for the first person from an organization and $995 for each additional person. Team participation is encouraged.

For more information, visit ala.org/LTC.

The ALA-Harwood Institute partnership is based on the idea that libraries, by virtue of their trusted position in their communities, are uniquely suited to help solve challenges of all types, from literacy to drug epidemics to distrust in government.

The Public Innovators Lab for Libraries will be based on Harwood’s “turning outward” approach, which emphasizes making the community the reference point for getting things done. This shift in orientation is achieved through practical steps: taking measures to better understand communities; being proactive about community issues; and putting community ambitions first.

The lab was recently enhanced to be even more hands-on, applied and practical. In May, nearly 300 Texas librarians participated in three new labs through a partnership between The Harwood Institute and the Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Libraries and library professionals around the country are already using The Harwood Institute’s approach to:

  • lead conversations with community members to better understand the kind of community they want and the challenges they see;
  • bring stakeholders together to get past gridlock and work on issues that matter to people;
  • improve library programming to be more relevant and connected to the struggles people face; and
  • better connect with underserved and often invisible populations in communities.

The Public Innovators Lab for Libraries is offered as part of the ALA’s Libraries Transforming Communities (LTC) initiative. The initiative addresses a critical need within the library field by developing and distributing new tools, resources and supportfor librarians to engage with their communities in new ways.

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File CE-MIG-Agenda-6-28-15-

by Nancy Kranich on Sun, Jun 21, 2015 at 06:11 pm

DOCX File, 181.77 KB

File CE-MIG-Agenda-2-1-15-with-meeting-notes-

by Nancy Kranich on Sun, Jun 21, 2015 at 06:10 pm

DOCX File, 219.88 KB

Event Libraries Foster Community Engagement Member Interest Group

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Mon, Jun 8, 2015 at 11:31 am

Meeting of the Libraries Foster Community Engagement Member Interest Group

Event ALA Center for Civic Life Advisory Committee

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Mon, Jun 8, 2015 at 11:31 am

Meeting of the ALA Center for Civic Life Advisory Committee

Discussion Kitchen Table Conversations 2015: We want to hear from you about membership!

by Sarah Ostman (staff) on Wed, May 27, 2015 at 12:03 pm

As part of an ongoing effort to improve member experience, ALA will host a series of gatherings at the 2015 ALA Annual Conference to get feedback about how we are communicating with current and prospective members.

As part of an ongoing effort to improve member experience, ALA will host a series of gatherings at the 2015 ALA Annual Conference to get feedback about how we are communicating with current and prospective members.

In the 90-minute Kitchen Table Conversations, ALA staff and member leaders will ask volunteers a series of open-ended questions about their interactions with ALA. Topics may include joining and renewing, streamlining email communications, and how ALA can help members get the information they need. A note-taker will be present to record comments, but they will be kept anonymous.

The conference will be held June 25 to 30 at the Moscone Convention Center in San Francisco.

The Kitchen Table Conversations are open to all conference-goers, regardless of membership status, and will be held at the following times. All gatherings will take place in the Marriott Marquis San Francisco Walnut room. (Follow the links to add the times to your Scheduler.)

The listening project is part of ALA’s effort to “turn outward” and better understand and serve its community through a partnership with The Harwood Institute for Public Innovation.

ALA has conducted Kitchen Table Conversations at previous national conferences; past topics have included library advocacy and the ALA conference experience. Previous participants in these conversations have said they welcome the opportunity to sit down with other attendees to share their thoughts and ideas with ALA.  

The “turning outward” approach is also helping libraries engage their communities. Libraries and library professionals around the country are using the Harwood Institute’s approach to:

  • lead conversations with community members to better understand their goals and concerns;
  • develop library strategic plans that benefit the library and the greater community;
  • connect with underserved segments of the library’s service area;
  • overcome political gridlock; and
  • create professional development opportunities that meet the library system’s needs.

Interested conference attendees can learn more about the approach at a series of four free, hands-on sessions. The sessions are offered as part of Libraries Transforming Communities (LTC), an ALA initiative that seeks to strengthen libraries’ roles as community leaders and change-agents by developing and distributing tools to help library professionals connect with their communities in new ways. The initiative is made possible through a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

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Libraries Foster Community Engagement provides an ALA organizational home for members interested in the work of library-led community engagement. It is a community of practice where participants share experiences facilitating public forums, fostering community and civic engagement, and leading change in communities. Participants also hear about professional development opportunities and library experiences related to convening, dialogue facilitation, forum moderation, deliberative dialogue and local partnerships to help communities understand issues of concern and solve problems together.

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