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Discussion A Spectrum of Digital Initiatives: Project and Pedagogical Collaborations in Digital Humanities

by Thomas Padilla on Tue, May 24, 2016 at 09:42 am

A Spectrum of Digital Initiatives: Project and Pedagogical Collaborations in Digital Humanities

(ALA Annual)

Date: 6/25/2016

Time: 1:00 - 2:30  

Location: Orange County Convention Center, Room W108

A Spectrum of Digital Initiatives: Project and Pedagogical Collaborations in Digital Humanities

(ALA Annual)

Date: 6/25/2016

Time: 1:00 - 2:30  

Location: Orange County Convention Center, Room W108

The Digital Humanities Interest Group (DHIG) has organized an ALA Annual panel presentation from Laurie Taylor (University of Florida), Emma Wilson (University of Alabama), and Barbara Lewis (University of South Florida) that explores "A Spectrum of Digital Initiatives: Project and Pedagogical Collaborations in Digital Humanities"Each panelist will discuss a different use case, ranging from creating research data content in special collections to teaching digital tools. The program will reveal diverse methods by which librarians can collaborate on Digital Humanities initiatives at their institutions. 

Please see below for speaker bios and talk descriptions. 

Look forward to seeing you all!

Thomas Padilla and Harriett Green 


Laurie N. Taylor, PhD, is the Digital Scholarship Librarian at the University of Florida (UF). Her work focuses on socio-technical (people, policies, technologies, communities) supports for scholarly cyberinfrastructure. She is a co-convenor for the Digital Humanities Working Group, Board Member for the DH Graduate Certificate, and collaborates with many others to enable an environment of radical collaboration. She is the Digital Scholarship Director for the international collaborative Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) and was a founding Steering Committee Member for the Florida Digital Humanities Consortium (FLDH).

Abstract

Laurie N. Taylor will present “Digital Humanities is Always Public Humanities at the University of Florida” where she will explain the unique aspects of UF with digital and public humanities, informatics, arts, academic publishing, and libraries all in conversation and collaboration for mutual goals. The presentation will highlight UF’s experiences as a partner in the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC, www.dLOC.com) in library and scholar collaborations that draw upon and enrich library collections to build innovative new DH resources, as well as to integrate libraries and DH into the classroom, as with “Panama Silver, Asian Gold: Migration, Money, and the Making of the Modern Caribbean DOCC” (Distributed Online Collaborative Course) taught by literature and Black Studies faculty in collaboration with their librarians and archivists. The presentation will also include a review of UF’s new DH Graduate Certificate. The DH Graduate Certificate the first of its kind at UF with the Certificate fully controlled by the board—not any single department or college—with set representation from multiple colleges, including the libraries. The DH Graduate Certificate is specifically designed to build towards an environment of radical collaboration with new Research Groups with representatives from the teaching and library faculty and graduate students working together to serve Big Humanities needs, including those in collaboration with the Digital Library of the Caribbean, Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature, and others.


Dr. Emma Annette Wilson is Digital Scholarship Librarian and Assistant Professor of English at the University of Alabama, where she manages over 80 Digital Humanities projects at the Alabama Digital Humanities Center. She is the founder of the annual DH conference, Digitorium (http://apps.lib.ua.edu/blog/digitorium), and in addition to co-editing two essay collections on Renaissance intellectual history, she is currently completing a monograph on John Milton, and is due to begin research in the Fall comparing DH centers and labs worldwide to determine alternative modes of generating digital scholarship.

Abstract

How can libraries play a leading role in Digital Humanities? In this presentation, Emma Annette Wilson will share the initiatives underway at the Alabama Digital Humanities Center which are bringing together faculty, students, and library experts in metadata and IT in fruitful collaborations generating digital projects for both research and teaching. In the past two years, the ADHC has grown from supporting 6 Digital Humanities projects to over 80 projects in more than 15 different departments. This presentation will discuss the outreach initiatives that enabled this growth, as well as exploring a selection of the projects which have emerged as a direct result of library and departmental collaborations, generating not only productive scholarly outcomes but also a new multi-disciplinary community both on campus at the University of Alabama and also further afield via inter-institutional partnerships. Digital pedagogy projects have been key to engaging new faculty members, and examples discussed will include digital mapping projects, timelines, blogs, and 3D printing in fields ranging from English and History to Clothing, Textiles, and Interior Design. The presentation culminates in a showcase of two large-scale digital research projects, both involved in making rare book materials available and discoverable to a wider audience. The first uses TEI to encode an eighteenth-century Colombian manuscript, whilst the second is to digitize and make searchable the manuscript marginalia of John Stuart Mill, which the ADHC is doing in partnership with Somerville College, Oxford. Collaboration is at the heart of digital scholarship, and this presentation highlights key areas of expertise within libraries making them particularly well-positioned to engage in this kind of research and teaching as equal partners with faculty and students across campus and beyond. 


Barbara Lewis is Assistant Director for Digital Learning Initiatives. Barbara's primary aim is to inform and educate students and faculty about the many digital/multimedia options available to complement, supplement, or replace analog course assignments with the goal for students to develop the digital and multimedia skills that are of value to future employers. She is on the Steering Committee and Executive Council of the Florida Digital Humanities Consortium, a member of ACRL’s Digital Humanities Interest Group, and the ACRL/ULS Committee on the Future of University Libraries, and recently was a panelist at the ACRL ULS Online Discussion: Digital Creation Centers in Academic Libraries.

Abstract

Barbara Lewis will present "Multimedia Transformation: Libraries as Resources for Digital Storytelling Tools.”  As librarians, ours is a history of providing the world with organized access to information resources and to teaching information literacy skills. In today's world, the demand for multimedia experience and digital literacy skills is growing and employers are expecting those qualifications in their new employees. As resource organizers and providers, the library has a significant role to play in preparing students for their future workplaces and digital storytelling is skill that will serve them well. This presentation will explore the nature of digital storytelling and how it relates to traditional research papers and multimedia projects. We will discuss how narrative devices can be employed to deliver engaging and well-researched presentations, how libraries can provide the resources and tools that storytellers use, and how to partner with faculty to transform existing assignments into high-quality and engaging digital alternatives for their students. 

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Discussion DHIG Update, Mission Statement Revision, 2017-2018 Convener Nominations

by Thomas Padilla on Mon, May 23, 2016 at 03:40 pm

Dear Colleagues, 
 
Over the last few years, the Digital Humanities Interest Group has steadily grown in size and responsibility. What began as a discussion group now has become an interest group, and depending on the wishes of the membership, section status is a future possibility. 
 
A couple of notes on DHIG activity over the past year:

Dear Colleagues, 
 
Over the last few years, the Digital Humanities Interest Group has steadily grown in size and responsibility. What began as a discussion group now has become an interest group, and depending on the wishes of the membership, section status is a future possibility. 
 
A couple of notes on DHIG activity over the past year:

  • Member count is 787 as of March 2016, up from 162 at the end of 2015
  • Partnered with the Digital Curation Interest Group to offer an ACRL e-Learning Webcast, "Engaging the Digital Humanities: Collaborating throughout the Research Lifecycle"
  • Organized a panel at ALA Midwinter on, "Fostering Digital Humanities Community On Campus and Beyond"
  • Organized meet-ups at DLF 2015 and ALA Midwinter
  • Organized a panel for ALA Annual on, "A Spectrum of Digital Initiatives: Project and Pedagogical Collaborations in Digital Humanities"
  • Co-sponsoring two programs at ALA Annual with the ACRL Digital Scholarship Interest Group Program and the ACRL Anthropology and Social Science Section, respectively 

During the DHIG business meeting at ALA Annual 2016, we will discuss a number of important issues:
 
MISSION STATEMENT
Krista White (Rutgers University) and Hannah Skates Kettler (University of Iowa) are currently the Incoming Digital Humanities Interest Group Co-Conveners, and they will begin their 2016-2017 term as Co-Conveners following Annual. Given the scope of activities that DHIG has been involved in and its trend toward maturation as a community, Hannah, Krista, Harriett, and I have developed a revised draft DHIG mission statement. We welcome any and all feedback, and will dedicate time to discussing during the meeting. 
 
Submit mission statement feedback
  
2017-2018 CONVENER NOMINATIONS
In addition, we are asking that interested individuals submit self nominations to become one of the next two Co-Conveners of DHIG during the 2017-2018 term. If you are interested in running for co-convener, please complete the nomination form linked below by JUNE 15. Time will be allocated during the DHIG ALA Annual meeting for candidates to present brief nomination statements to the membership. Attendance at ALA Annual 2016 is not a requirement for self nomination. Post meeting, the Co-Conveners will distribute a candidate ballot for membership wide vote. 
 
Submit self nomination for 2017-2018 convener, due JUNE 15
 
We hope you will review the draft Mission Statement and consider the Co-Convener nomination in preparation for our ALA Annual meeting, and please let us know if you have any questions.

 
Sincerely, 
 
Thomas Padilla and Harriett Green 

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Discussion ACRL Digital Scholarship Center Interest Group Program at ALA Annual 2016

by Harriett Green on Thu, May 19, 2016 at 11:11 pm

The DHIG is co-sponsoring this ALA Annual program with the Digital Scholarship Center Interest Group:

Starting from Scratch: Build Your Digital Scholarship Center Program

When: Saturday, June 25 10:30 am
Where: Orange County Convention Center W109a

The DHIG is co-sponsoring this ALA Annual program with the Digital Scholarship Center Interest Group:

Starting from Scratch: Build Your Digital Scholarship Center Program

When: Saturday, June 25 10:30 am
Where: Orange County Convention Center W109a

Description:
At prior meetings of the ACRL Digital Scholarship Center Interest Group (DSCIG) attendees have frequently asked questions about how to start a Center. What services are offered? Who works there? How much were the start-up costs and where did the funding come from? How do you promote the Center so faculty and students use it? Who are the partners? All good questions, and given how the Center is structured at different institutions the answers can vary.

This program features experienced DSC developers who will share their stories and expertise about how they got started, what they learned and what they’d do today if they were starting from scratch. Who should attend? Librarians planning to develop or thinking of starting a Digital Scholarship Center at their institution, and those who want to learn more about what Digital Scholarship Centers are and what they offer. Librarians more experienced with Digital Scholarship Centers are invited to join the conversation, share tips and meet colleagues from other Centers.

Speakers:
Christina Bell, Humanities Librarian, Bates College, Ladd Library

Andrew White, Director of Academic and Client Services, Bates College

Pamela Price Mitchem, M.A., Ed.S., C.A., DAS
Coordinator of Digital Scholarship and Initiatives, Special Collections, Belk Library & Information Commons
Appalachian State University

Eric D. M. Johnson
Head, Innovative Media
Virginia Commonwealth University Libraries

Join us to hear perspectives on starting a DSC from scratch based on the experience of speakers from three different sized and mission differentiated institutions.

This program is co-sponsored in name only by the ACRL Digital Curation Interest Group and the ACRL Digital Humanities Interest Group.

Thank you.

Steven Bell, DSCIG co-convener
Merinda Kaye Hensley, DSCIG co-convener

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Discussion Webinar Program Now Available --- Engaging the Digital Humanities: Collaborating throughout the Research Lifecycle

by Thomas Padilla on Thu, Mar 3, 2016 at 09:10 am

Dear Colleagues, 

The webinar program is now available for, "Engaging the Digital Humanities: Collaborating throughout the Research Lifecycle." We have a great series of presentations lined up and look forward to learning about how our peers are engaging the Digital Humanities on their campuses. 


Registration:

http://www.ala.org/acrl/researchlifecycle


Abstracts:

Dear Colleagues, 

The webinar program is now available for, "Engaging the Digital Humanities: Collaborating throughout the Research Lifecycle." We have a great series of presentations lined up and look forward to learning about how our peers are engaging the Digital Humanities on their campuses. 


Registration:

http://www.ala.org/acrl/researchlifecycle


Abstracts:

Fostering Community through Grassroots DH at Mississippi State University

Hillary Richardson and Nickoal Eichmann
Mississippi State University Libraries

How does a group of graduate and undergraduate students, history faculty, and research librarians, who are not beholden to assignment deadlines, grades, or even degree requirements, form a project team for civil rights digital scholarship? Miriam Posner, esteemed digital humanist and blog writer, has written, “For me, community happens when people are genuinely invested in seeing each other succeed. This doesn’t happen by being nice to each other--although there’s nothing wrong with that, per se--but by recognizing and rewarding other people’s work” (2014, “Here and There,” miriamposner.com/blog/here-and-there-creating-dh-community/). This sentiment, combined with a collective passion for the subject matter, served as the glue that held together the team responsible for “‘A Shaky Truce’: Starkville Civil Rights Struggles, 1960-1980” (starkvillecivilrights.msstate.edu). This project, a digital history website, features oral history interviews from locals who share stories of desegregation and integration in Starkville, MS during the late 60s and early 70s. To contextualize these stories, the project used archives in the Mississippi State University (MSU) Libraries and donated personal collections to provide tools for researchers and teachers. The project team has spent just under 2 years (and counting) developing a site that bridges town-and-gown, and tells a unique story unlike the narrative of Civil Rights History that is normally taught in Mississippi or Civil Rights history classes.

In this presentation, we plan to address a) the different stages of our project, b) DH skills needed, and c) collaboration within the library and externally in order to build “A Shaky Truce.” We will discuss how librarians were able to get buy-in from busy undergraduates, teaching and dissertating graduate students, and over-worked faculty (on sabbatical!) who had no previous experience with DH projects. Though not committed in a traditional sense (e.g. enrolled in a course with this as a final project, doing this research for a thesis, etc.), we were able to corral 11 people to conduct original research, try out various digital tools, and experiment with website design, effectively serving as project managers for this hodgepodge group of constituents. In addition to highlighting the digital tools for the site (e.g. WordPress, OHMS, TimelineJS), we will also discuss how we leveraged institutional and community resources to grow our project community beyond our university walls.

Carlos Montezuma’s Wassaja Newsletter: Access, Engagement, and Collaboration

Matthew Harp
Arizona State University Libraries

In 2014/2015 Arizona State University (ASU) Libraries, the Labriola National American Indian Data Center, and the ASU American Indian Studies Department completed an ASU Institute for Humanities Research (IHR) seed grant entitled “Carlos Montezuma’s Wassaja Newsletter: Digitization, Access and Context” to digitize all ASU held issues of the newsletter Wassaja Freedom’s Signal for the Indian, which Yavapai activist-intellectual Carlos Montezuma, MD (1866-1923) self-published during 1916-1922. The grant team additionally selected a portion of the ASU Libraries Carlos Montezuma archival collection for digitization to provide a more complete picture of Dr. Carlos Montezuma’s life and work. The ASU grant team produced a searchable online collection on the ASU Digital Repository and created an online exhibition in conjunction with the IHR Nexus Lab’s Developing Wassaja Project. The Nexus Lab’s role at ASU is to grow the digital humanities through interdisciplinary collaborations bringing together humanities, science, and technology. The Nexus Lab partnered with the grant team to create the Developing Wassaja Project which provided an opportunity for faculty, staff, and students at ASU to engage in electronic publication through web application development.

The resulting web platform Wassaja: A Carlos Montezuma Project http://wassaja.lib.asu.edu/ provides context for this digitized collection and facilitates community interaction, including a partnership with Dr. Montezuma’s home community the Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation. In this webcast Digital Projects Librarian Matthew Harp , Developing Wassaja Project team member Joe Buenker (subject librarian), and grant team member Joyce Martin (librarian and curator of the Labriola National American Indian Data Center) will discuss and demonstrate the resources created and the resulting partnership with the Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation. The webcast will focus on identifying collaborators and needed skills to engage in Digital Humanities research and on identifying the stages of a collaborative project. Participants will gain insight on working directly with diverse communities; overcoming technical limitations of traditional institutional repositories; collaborative strategies with faculty, research centers, and cultural heritage societies; solutions for moving hidden collections into an engaging digital exhibition; integrating digital humanities research and instruction with library curation; and preparing for long term costs and management issues.

Digital Humanities Un-Centered: Engaging Your Campus Networks to Support Scholarship and Teaching

Laura Braunstein
Dartmouth College

How can you build upon existing relationships in order to support digital humanities on your campus? You and your library already have networks with colleagues across campus and throughout the global scholarly community. This interactive presentation will give you a set of strategies to utilize pre-existing partnerships in order to support and foster scholarship, research, and learning through DH projects, programs, and events. This collaborative model can help librarians, faculty, IT professionals, and students work together and with their colleagues, with or without a digital humanities center.

While institutions that have digital humanities centers benefit from -- and indeed, function precisely because of -- the collaboration of librarians with faculty and staff across campus, not all institutions have the resources to organize their services in this way. This opens a space in which cross-campus relationships can function as an “uncenter”; that is, we can provide services and build a community of practice at institutions that either don’t have digital humanities centers, or lack centralized leadership initiatives to build and sustain them.

Librarians and their colleagues can do the following to build an “uncentered” digital humanities community on campus: form partnerships with specific faculty who already have demonstrated interests in digital humanities; strengthen relationships with administrators and leadership; organize social events and offer hands-on workshops, scholarly lectures, and faculty presentations; consolidate a community on campus through outreach about projects and events; and, finally, connect to the broader scholarly community by utilizing social media and hosting regional gatherings.


 

 

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File alamw16_notes

by Thomas Padilla on Fri, Feb 12, 2016 at 10:29 am

PDF File, 36.16 KB

Discussion ACRL E-Learning Webcast CFP - Engaging the Digital Humanities

by Thomas Padilla on Tue, Jan 19, 2016 at 10:16 am

ACRL E-Learning Webcast CFP

Engaging the Digital Humanities: Collaborating throughout the Research Lifecycle

Wednesday, March 23, 2016 from 1:00 - 2:30 p.m. Central time

Proposal Deadline: Friday, February 12, 2016


Dear Colleagues,

ACRL E-Learning Webcast CFP

Engaging the Digital Humanities: Collaborating throughout the Research Lifecycle

Wednesday, March 23, 2016 from 1:00 - 2:30 p.m. Central time

Proposal Deadline: Friday, February 12, 2016


Dear Colleagues,

The Digital Humanities Interest Group and the Digital Curation Interest Group invite presentation proposals that speak to the theme of “Engaging the Digital Humanities: Collaborating throughout the Research Lifecycle.” The selected presentations will be featured during our ACRL E-Learning Webcast on March 23.

Librarians are playing ever more integral roles in the Digital Humanities research lifecycle. Librarians contribute concretely to the conception, development, dissemination, preservation, and curation of digital humanities research. These activities often require collaborations between librarians working in a diverse range of roles including but not limited to subject liaisons, digital humanities and digital scholarship librarians, metadata librarians, and digital curation librarians.  

We invite presentation proposals based on first-hand experiences dealing with a wide array of data formats, tools, methods, and digital platforms utilized in Digital Humanities research, and placed in the context of the latest research literature.  By focusing discussion on practical challenges and solutions, it is our hope that your presentations will provide the library community with strategies that can be cross-purposed to a wide range of institutional contexts.

When crafting your proposal, please consider focusing on one or more of these learning outcomes:

  1. Participants will learn how to identify the stages of a Digital Humanities research project in order to better collaborate with researchers.

  2. Participants will learn about the use of data in Digital Humanities research in order to identify data curation needs.

  3. Participants will learn how to identify the skills they need to engage in Digital Humanities research.

  4. Participants will learn how to identify Digital Humanities research collaborators in the library.


Proposals should be no longer than 400 words, and can be submitted here:

Proposal submission form:  bit.ly/dhlifecycle

Proposals are due on February 12, 2016.

Notice of acceptance will be sent by February 17, 2016.

If you have questions, please contact Thomas Padilla at tpadilla@mail.lib.msu.edu


Thomas Padilla, Digital Scholarship Librarian, Michigan State University

Harriett Green, English and Digital Humanities Librarian, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Suzanna Conrad, Head of Digital Services & Technology, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

Brianna Marshall, Digital Curation Coordinator, University of Wisconsin-Madison

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Event Fostering Digital Humanities Community On Campus and Beyond (ALA Midwinter DHIG Meeting)

by Thomas Padilla on Mon, Nov 30, 2015 at 08:50 am

Fostering Digital Humanities Community On Campus and Beyond

(ALA MW DHIG Meeting)

Date: 1/10/2016

Time: 4:30 - 5:30  

Location: Westin Copley Place, Essex Center Room

Fostering Digital Humanities Community On Campus and Beyond

(ALA MW DHIG Meeting)

Date: 1/10/2016

Time: 4:30 - 5:30  

Location: Westin Copley Place, Essex Center Room

The ALA Midwinter Digital Humanities Interest Group (DHIG) meeting will consist of a series of short talks from Amanda Rust (Northeastern University), Caro Pinto (Mount Holyoke College), and Vika Zafrin (Boston University) that explore Fostering Digital Humanities Community On Campus and Beyond. Collectively our three speakers represent depth of experience growing the digital humanities within the library, outside the library, across the Boston area, and beyond. 

Please see below for speaker bios and talk descriptions. 

Look forward to seeing you all!

Thomas Padilla 


Amanda Rust is currently the Assistant Director of the Digital Scholarship Group in the Northeastern University Library. Her work focuses on library services for the digital humanities and archives as well as library-community engagement broadly speaking. She holds office in the Literatures in English Section of ACRL, a national forum for literature librarians, and has presented or written on topics like information literacy and instruction, Drupal and website design, theatre archives, library special collections and Wikipedia, and the digital humanities.

Abstract

Amanda will talk about her experience in DH in the Boston area, which is perhaps unique in having an extraordinary density of institutions of higher education, where most of those institutions are private and accustomed to going their own way.  She will talk about DH collaboration at Northeastern as well as how BostonDH has fit into the work that Northeastern does. She will also discuss how BostonDH events have helped shape her career and network of colleagues, how BostonDH has or has not fit into existing library consortia, and the eternal problem of sustainability within volunteer organizations.


Caro Pinto is a Librarian and Instructional Technology Liaison at Mount Holyoke College where she works at the intersections of special collections, instructional technology, and libraries that leads to dh adventures with undergraduates. She serves on the Five College Digital Humanities Steering Committee (5CDH). Pinto is also a review editor for dh+lib. Her essay, “Construction and Disruption: Building Communities of Practice, Queering Subject Liaisons.” appeared in Digital Humanities in the Library: Challenges and Opportunities for Subject Specialists last spring. 

Abstract

Undergraduate engagement is a major initiative at 5CDH. From J-Term classes to microgrants to student fellowship to the post-bac residency, 5CDH is creating an active pipeline of practitioners and critics. 5CDH is fostering a new generation of dh practitioners who actively collaborate, interrogate the technology, and ask engaging questions. Caro Pinto will talk about those efforts to integrate students into existing projects and how 5CDH creates a culture of collaboration among technologists, faculty, students, librarians, and post-bacs. 


Vika Zafrin has been Boston University's Institutional Repository Librarian since 2010. She supports BU researchers doing digital humanities and social sciences work, and advocates for a formal infrastructure to support DH at the university. Zafrin has been involved with the Boston DH Consortium since its inception, and with the Association for Computers and the Humanities since 2012. She holds a PhD in Humanities Computing from Brown.

Abstract

In my talk, I will discuss how my digital humanities advocacy work at Boston University informed, and has been informed by, my participation as an instructor in the 2013 Boston DH Consortium's Introduction to DH Faculty Retreat. I will share what I know of how the Consortium got its start, as well as some about its evolution over time. I will reflect on the campus advocacy experience at a large research university, and give a short report on where the BU Libraries are planning to take their nascent support for DH work.


 

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Discussion ACRL Program Proposals for 2016 ALA Annual Conference Due September 1

by Barbara Lewis on Tue, Aug 25, 2015 at 04:27 pm

I have an idea for a program proposal for this call (http://connect.ala.org/node/244108) and was wondering if anyone would be interested in joining me.  As of September 28, I will be the Assistant Director for Digital Learning Initiatives at my library.  Among other responsibilities, this job will include working with the DH community on campus and statewide.  My idea is to present a program/panel about what DH and digital learning jobs in libraries are like, and probably how they're not necessarily alike from institution to institution. 

I have an idea for a program proposal for this call (http://connect.ala.org/node/244108) and was wondering if anyone would be interested in joining me.  As of September 28, I will be the Assistant Director for Digital Learning Initiatives at my library.  Among other responsibilities, this job will include working with the DH community on campus and statewide.  My idea is to present a program/panel about what DH and digital learning jobs in libraries are like, and probably how they're not necessarily alike from institution to institution. 

What training and education do we have?  What services do we provide?  What departments do we most work with and what types of projects do we work on?  How do we collaborate with subject liaison librarians?  How do we keep up-to-date with the constantly evolving and expanding number of tools, applications, etc. available to the digital humanist?  How do we assess the impact of our efforts?  These are just a few examples of the questions we could address.

If you're interested in this idea, please respond as soon as possible since the proposal deadline is September 1.

Cheers,
Barbara

Barbara Lewis, MLS
Coordinator, Digital Initiatives & Services
University of South Florida / Tampa Library
4202 East Fowler Avenue, LIB 122
Tampa, FL 33620-5400
office: (813) 974-4040
fax:     (813) 974-5153
bilewis@usf.edu
http://works.bepress.com/blewis

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Discussion DHIG Annual 2015 Minutes

by Zach Coble on Wed, Jul 8, 2015 at 05:10 pm

Event Digital Humanities Interest Group Meeting

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Mon, Jun 22, 2015 at 07:15 pm

The meeting will feature two groups of speakers followed by a 15 minute business meeting.

Our first group of speakers will be Arianne Hartsell-Gundy (Head of the Humanities Section & Librarian for Literature and Theater Studies, Duke University) Laura Braunstein (Digital Humanities and English Librarian, Dartmouth College), and Liorah Golomb (Associate Professor and Humanities Librarian, University of Oklahoma). Our second speaker is Justin Schell (CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow, Digital Arts Sciences + Humanities, University of Minnesota).

The meeting will feature two groups of speakers followed by a 15 minute business meeting.

Our first group of speakers will be Arianne Hartsell-Gundy (Head of the Humanities Section & Librarian for Literature and Theater Studies, Duke University) Laura Braunstein (Digital Humanities and English Librarian, Dartmouth College), and Liorah Golomb (Associate Professor and Humanities Librarian, University of Oklahoma). Our second speaker is Justin Schell (CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow, Digital Arts Sciences + Humanities, University of Minnesota).

Arianne Hartsell-Gundy, Laura Braunstein, and Liorah Golomb are co-editors of the recently published book, Digital Humanities in the Library: Challenges and Opportunities for Subject Specialists. In their talk, “DH in the Library: What’s Missing, What’s Next?,” the three will discuss the book, describe additional case studies and projects, and facilitate a discussion on further collaborations among DH communities of practice.

Justin Schell will discuss the foundation and continued work of Digital Arts Sciences + Humanities, or DASH, at the University of Minnesota Libraries. DASH is a cross-disciplinary project from the University of Minnesota Libraries organized around emerging digital tools and methodologies for scholarly, pedagogical, and artistic projects. Through projects ranging across research projects, the classroom, and exploratory projects internal to the Libraries, Justin will articulate how DASH attempts to provide a low-barrier to these emerging digital tools and methodologies and connect often disparate communities of practice, both within and across the disciplines.

The last 15 minutes will be used for the business meeting.

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Provides a forum for the discussion and exchange of ideas regarding current and developing approaches to Digital Humanities scholarship in the library.

The Digital Humanities Interest Group mailing list is: acrldigitalhumanitiesig@ala.org. To subscribe, please go to  http://lists.ala.org/sympa/info/acrldigitalhumanitiesig and click on the "Subscribe" link in the lower left corner.

 

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