GODORT (Government Documents Round Table) RoundTable

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Discussion new book about the Serial Set

by Karen Hogenboom on Tue, Mar 4, 2014 at 03:47 pm

Colleagues,

Colleagues,

I am happy to announce the publication of The Serial Set: Its Makeup and Content, edited by GODORT’s own Andrea Sevetson and including many chapters written by GODORT authors.  For details, see the GODORT Publications Committee wiki page: http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/Publications#The_Serial_Set:_Its_Make-up_and_Content.     Topics covered include America’s changing place in the world, radical groups, controversies and scandals, art in the Serial Set, and many more.  The complete table of contents is available here: http://wikis.ala.org/godort/images/8/8b/SerialSetBookTitleContents.pdf

Proquest is donating all proceeds from the sale of the book to GODORT, and you can place an order for yourself or your library from the wiki page linked above.  Happy reading!

Karen Hogenboom

Chair, GODORT Publications Committee

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Discussion Need input on draft statements on the future of of govt information and the FDLP

by James Jacobs on Fri, Jan 24, 2014 at 12:43 pm

(I'm posting on behalf of Bernadine Abbott Hoduski, chair of GODORT Legislation Committee)

GODORT Legislation committee has drafted 6 short statements on various aspects pertaining to the future of government information and the FDLP. We need input, suggestions, edits on these drafts from all GODORT members BY FEBRUARY 10, 2014. Please email your comments to Bernadine Abbott Hoduski (ber@montana.com) AND James Jacobs (jrjacobs@stanford.edu).

(I'm posting on behalf of Bernadine Abbott Hoduski, chair of GODORT Legislation Committee)

GODORT Legislation committee has drafted 6 short statements on various aspects pertaining to the future of government information and the FDLP. We need input, suggestions, edits on these drafts from all GODORT members BY FEBRUARY 10, 2014. Please email your comments to Bernadine Abbott Hoduski (ber@montana.com) AND James Jacobs (jrjacobs@stanford.edu).

The goal is to distribute these statements to librarians throughout ALA as well as to Congress and their staffs to alert them to the issues and generate ongoing support for long-term FREE access to and preservation of both historic paper and born-digital government publications.

All 6 draft statements are combined in the single attached PDF document. Here are the working titles of all 6:

  • DIGITIZATION AND PRESERVATION OF HISTORIC US GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS
  • THE NEXT GENERATION OF GOVERNMENT INFORMATION LIBRARIANS: A PROPOSAL FOR THEIR EDUCATION
  • FEDERAL DEPOSITORY LIBRARY PROGRAM: SUSTAINABLE STRUCTURE FOR THE 21ST CENTURY
  • FEDERAL LIBRARIES AND THEIR ROLE WITHIN THE FEDERAL DEPOSITORY LIBRARY PROGRAM
  • LIBRARIES – THE LAST BEST PLACE FOR PRESERVING PAPER & DIGITAL GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS
  • TECHNOLOGY TOOLS TO SIMPLIFY AND EXPAND ACCESS TO FEDERAL GOVERNMENT INFORMATION

Thank you in advance for your time in reading and submitting comments!

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Discussion Google Book Search: What impact with the GBS saga have on copyright reform?

by Kristine Kasianovitz on Wed, Jan 22, 2014 at 01:18 pm

Hi -

This is not a GODORT Sponsored talk but it might be of interest to many of you.  I'm posting this on behalf of Carrie Russell, the Program Director Public Access to Information which is part of ALA OITP (Office for Information Technology Policy).  

 Google Book Search: What impact with the GBS saga have on copyright reform?

1-2:30pm Sunday

Convention Center 114

Hi -

This is not a GODORT Sponsored talk but it might be of interest to many of you.  I'm posting this on behalf of Carrie Russell, the Program Director Public Access to Information which is part of ALA OITP (Office for Information Technology Policy).  

 Google Book Search: What impact with the GBS saga have on copyright reform?

1-2:30pm Sunday

Convention Center 114

Fred von Lohmann (legal counsel to Google, formerly at Electronic Frontier Foundation) will discuss the court dismissal of Authors Guild v. Google. 

The library associations’ amicus brief on behalf of Google was referenced by Judge Chin who said that GBS “has become an invaluable research tool that permits, teachers, librarians, and others to more efficiently identify and locate books.” He continues, “It has given scholars the ability, for the first time, to conduct full-text searches of tens of millions of books. It preserves books, in particular out-of-print and old books that have been forgotten in the bowels of libraries, and it gives them new life.”

The Authors Guild, however, has appealed. Will the decision have any impact on Congress’ promised review of the copyright law?  Laura Quilter from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and Lisa Macklin from Emory University will serve as respondents. 

This will be a great program with some “behind the scenes” details. 

 

Thanks!

-Carrie

Carrie Russell

Program Director, Public Access to Information

ALA Office for Information Technology Policy

1615 New Hampshire Avenue NW First Floor

Washington, DC 20009

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Discussion FDTF: Discussion MidWinter 2014 (Philadelphia)

by Jill Vassilakos-Long on Tue, Jan 21, 2014 at 07:03 pm

We are going to discuss past initiatives in which the documents community collaborated, look at the results, and determine what we would like to focus on from now until Annual. The goal is to identify a few items, report to FDTF in June on the progress or lack of progress on those items, and write a one page description for them that could be used by people lobbying for support for government information access and the FDLP.

These are some of the issues that our task force has worked on in the past:

We are going to discuss past initiatives in which the documents community collaborated, look at the results, and determine what we would like to focus on from now until Annual. The goal is to identify a few items, report to FDTF in June on the progress or lack of progress on those items, and write a one page description for them that could be used by people lobbying for support for government information access and the FDLP.

These are some of the issues that our task force has worked on in the past:

1) Fugitive documents:
Background: this has been a concern of the depository library community since its inception and electronic dissemination (with more and more information published directly by the agencies onto the web) has exacerbated the problem.
Where we are:
What's next:
Questions/ issues that remain: Providing meaningful intellectual access via excellent cataloging? Simple metadata harvesting for quick and dirty access?

2) Collection of last resort:
Background: It would be difficult to find every FDLP document that has been disseminated. Damage, loss, theft, destructive digitization, etc. have all taken a toll on our "complete" Regional collections. As materials go online, fewer libraries see a reason to keep hardcopy.  At one point we worked on developing a "Collection of Last Resort." I believe that GPO even collected some documents from Regionals that were giving up their status.
Where we are:
What's next:
Questions/ issues that remain:

3) Mirror Server:
Background: As more of the collection goes electronic the concern that a computer virus or hardware failure could take out portions of the electronic collection have haunted librarians. A power failure in D.C. could make government information unavailable for the duration, a fire could take out the server and the back-ups. Plans were made to create a full backup and house it on the west coast, so that there would be redundancy (and it could help with sharing the load) for access to the collection.
Where we are:
What's next:
Questions/ issues that remain:

4) Hard copies of electronic documents as part of the Collection of Last Resort:
Background: Most documents are now "born digital." In many cases, everyone is pointing at the original, on an agency website. There have been situations where that copy became corrupted, and the agency did not have any hardcopy, there was no way to re-create the file. Some of these files could have been printed out and kept in a collection of last resort. (Andrea Sevetson tried to do some of this when she was at Berkeley, but it was too overwhelming for one librarian with a printer.)
Where we are:
What's next:
Questions/ issues that remain:

5) Have a comprehensive catalog of all government publications. It would incorporate all government publications, both depository and non-depository so that it is a true national bibliography.
Background: The Monthly Catalog used to include both depository and non-depository documents, depository documents were marked with a dot so that people would know that they had been distributed through the program.  This meant that a correct title and author could be found for any government publication, then, even if it was not a depository item, the librarian could perform an effective search for the publication.
Where we are:
What's next:
Questions/ issues that remain:

6) New item selection methods:
Background: Librarians have long asked for a more precise method of profiling their depository's needs so that they did not become responsible for materials that were not needed by their communities.
Where we are: GPO has created more detailed item selections and freed the process from the calendar (you may now add or delete items from your depository's profile at any time of the year).
What's next:
Questions/ issues that remain:

7) Online training modules:
Background: Depository Librarians usually work on their own in libraries, they are usually the only government information "expert" in the building and we need a system for continuing education and mentoring so that we can improve our skills and knowledge.
Where we are: GPO has done much of this – Sup. Docs. Mary Alice Baish will provide information.
What's next:
Questions/ issues that remain: Developing a list of most needed modules.

8) Authentication:
Background: One problem in the electronic environment is that patrons need to be certain that the item they are viewing is official and has not been tampered with (or hacked) in any way.
Where we are: GPO has created a digital watermark.
What's next:
Questions/ issues that remain:

9) Versioning
Background: Agencies have a tendency to remove documents from their sites and put up the latest version; which is fine, except some people want the earlier version, which could be solved by immediately having the PURL resolve to GPO's stored copy, which would be fine except that some people would then use outdated information when they thought that it was the current information....
Where we are:
What's next:
Questions/ issues that remain:
Better suggestion: connect the PURL to something that looks like a pre-AACR2 serial record
(with all the title variations on it and all of them linking to issues from their era), create a
mock-holdings record with every edition listed and linked to it's own URL.  The holdings
should be listed in reverse chronological order and, above the top one there should be
a "link to content on agency site" below that the first PURL should be "link to 2014
edition, which should be the same as the link to content on agency site, if you notice
that it's different please send an email to Joe P. at GPO ."  Libraries
came up with serials' bibliographic records and holdings records for a reason - don't
reinvent the wheel.

10) Print on demand
Background: Many librarians feel that some documents are easier to use in paper than in electronic format.  GPO considered creating deposit accounts (with an annual deposit from GPO) for each library.  This money could be used to select a few documents that are only produced electronically in print through print-on-demand.
Where we are: The program was not funded and the depository community seemed  unenthusiastic about the proposal at the DLC where samples were available.
What's next:
Questions/ issues that remain:

11) GPO offering MARC format bibliographic records to depositories so that such records could be uploaded to each library's online catalog
Background: Cataloging staff cost money, purchasing records for cataloging documents from vendors
costs money, GPO worked with Nan Myers to develop a low-cost alternative to encourage libraries
to get full cataloging records for documents into their OPACs.
Where we are: Maybe offer a handout on how - or a list of libraries (with their OPAC software system listed so you could find one with the same software as your library's) that are will to share programming scripts and do a little mentoring?
What's next:
Questions/ issues that remain:

12) Open URL compatible web addresses for govdocs
Background: Many libraries are running SFX or MetaLib, if PURLs were parsable these could be included in commercial databases and would resolve at the GPO full text.
Where we are:
What's next:
Questions/ issues that remain:
Explanation of a "parsable" purl: Chris Brown once showed a DLC audience how he had used the standard numbering format of a report series to populate the url field in a database and then upload every record for that series in his OPAC with a PURL. This should be possible for everything. For instance, if a document has an isbn then the PURL could be some prefix (GPO?) followed by the ISBN. If it were a serial, you could use the ISSN and have a page at that address that would list the issues (and include name changes, etc.) If this were extended to an issue level (the address would look like:GPOvi) would take the researcher to the table of content for that issue. It could even be taken to a page level GPOvip

13) Decision Framework for Federal Document Repositories:
Background: This was meant to address the questions of types of archives needed for the depository program.
Where we are: We're having difficulty keeping existing Regionals with existing responsibilities
in the program.  At this moment going further seems counter-productive.  (P.S. I'm not sure
I'm remembering this one correctly.  My feelings will not be hurt if you point out that I'm dead
wrong.)
What's next:
Questions/ issues that remain:

14) GPO create bridge between agencies and librarians as expert users so that librarian's could help shape electronic publications to increase usability
Background: Librarians notice how difficult many databases are for patrons to use and librarians have a lot of experience with both databases and novice searchers.  Agencies seem to only understand the needs of expert searchers and create databases that seem, on the surface, to be aggressively opaque. GPO could set up a service to agencies by getting a list of librarians who would agree to beta-test databases and give timely feedback to agencies.
Where we are: STAT-USA said that their database was the simplest database on God's earth...
What's next:
Questions/ issues that remain:

 

**************

Are there others that people would like to see added to the list?

Sincerely,

Jill

 

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Event GODORT Nominating Committee

by Cassandra Hartnett on Thu, Jan 16, 2014 at 06:25 pm

AGENDA

ALA Midwinter 2014
GODORT Nominating Committee Meeting
Friday, January 24, 2014, 3-4 p.m.
Courtyard, Phillip H. Johnson Library room

 

  1. Introductions and Welcome
  2. Review of GODORT 2014 slate (closed discussion)
  3. Discussion of remaining work re: ballot, election, notification of results (see Policy & Procedures Manual)
  4. Final thoughts?

Event GODORT Program Committee Midwinter 2014 Meeting

by Helen Sheehy on Wed, Jan 15, 2014 at 12:51 pm

AGENDA

ALA Midwinter 2014
Program Committee Meeting
Friday, January 24, 2014, 3-4 p.m.
Courtyard, Washington

  1. Introductions and Welcome
  2. Review of 2013 Program & Preconference
  3. Discussion of 2014 Program -- Tribes and Scribes: A Double Feature on Native American and WPA Historical Research
  4. Discussion of program/preconference ideas for Annual 2015
  5. Final thoughts?

 

Discussion GODORT Happy Hour in Philadelphia

by Sarah Erekson on Thu, Jan 9, 2014 at 11:19 pm

 

Don't fret! There is a way to socialize and network with your Government Documents colleagues and friends at ALA Midwinter In Philadelphia.  

Join us at 10 Arts Bistro & Lounge at the Ritz-Carlton for the GODORT Happy Hour.

5-7 pm on Friday January 24. 

 http://10arts.com/m/index.php

 

Don't fret! There is a way to socialize and network with your Government Documents colleagues and friends at ALA Midwinter In Philadelphia.  

Join us at 10 Arts Bistro & Lounge at the Ritz-Carlton for the GODORT Happy Hour.

5-7 pm on Friday January 24. 

 http://10arts.com/m/index.php

http://maps.google.com/maps?q=10arts+philadelphia&hl=en&view=map&cid=11772183292084439238&z=17&iwloc=A

Just about two blocks from the last meetings! Happy hour specials on food and drinks! Don't miss it!

 

 

 

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Discussion Moving GODORT Forward: all hands on deck

by Cassandra Hartnett on Mon, Dec 23, 2013 at 09:24 pm

Because the Depository Library Conference was cancelled in October, and because ALA has radically shifted our ballot deadlines from previous years, we do not have the luxury of face to face conversations with all of you as we recruit you to run for offices and keep our vibrant, essential association out in front of the issues.

Because the Depository Library Conference was cancelled in October, and because ALA has radically shifted our ballot deadlines from previous years, we do not have the luxury of face to face conversations with all of you as we recruit you to run for offices and keep our vibrant, essential association out in front of the issues.

Please, we need your help, most especially in finding our Chair Elect, International Docs Task Force Coordinator (1 yr) *and* Coordinator-Elect (2 yrs), State Docs Coordinator (2 yrs), and new members for 3 committees: Awards, Bylaws & Organization, and Nominating. Register yourself on our ballot by the end of the day on  iday, January 3rd -- use ALA's online form at https://www.alavote.org/nomination/2014users.html

Select the second option (Divisions/Sections/Round Tables) and then number 64 GODORT. The form takes you through many steps, so hang in there until the end.

Thanks again for your willingness to serve,

Cass Hartnett cass@uw.edu 206-685-3130
GODORT Nominations Chair http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/Nominating

on behalf of:

Barbie Selby bms8z@virginia.edu 434-982-2677
Helen Sheehy hms2@psu.edu 814-863-1347
John Stevenson john.a.stevenson@gmail.com 302-831-8671
Bill Sudduth sudduthw@mailbox.sc.edu 803-777-1775 (desk) 803-777-4841

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Discussion Please Apply! Government Information Librarian at Columbia University

by Starr Hoffman on Tue, Dec 17, 2013 at 02:48 pm

Come work with me at Columbia! I'm the Journalism Librarian, working with the Social Sciences Libraries Division, and love it. My work heavily involves documents, so I'm looking forward to whoever takes this position! (Please forgive cross-postings.)

Government Information Librarian

Columbia University Libraries/Information Services

Come work with me at Columbia! I'm the Journalism Librarian, working with the Social Sciences Libraries Division, and love it. My work heavily involves documents, so I'm looking forward to whoever takes this position! (Please forgive cross-postings.)

Government Information Librarian

Columbia University Libraries/Information Services

The Columbia University Libraries invites nominations and applications for the position of Government Information Librarian. The Libraries seek an energetic, knowledgeable and technologically adept professional to support research, instruction and training, and active outreach for faculty and students in support of federal, state, local, foreign, and international government information, and social sciences resources, including data sources. The position oversees the Libraries’ federal depository collection in all formats; maintains and updates item selection; liaises with GPO; updates MARCIVE records profile; and evaluates, selects, and recommends databases for purchase in the areas of government information and international affairs. The incumbent will develop and maintain government information services webpages, the Lehman Library blog, and other social media for communicating programs and services to the schools and departments directly served by the Lehman Social Science Library and the University community at large. The Government Information Librarian will engage technologies emerging as critical to research and teaching, including those supporting data-intensive research. The position will collaborate with colleagues from across the Columbia University Libraries, including the Digital Social Science Center, the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, and the Center for New Media Teaching and Learning to support the evolution and enhancement of innovative library services and technology initiatives. This position will report to the Director of the Social Sciences Libraries Division.

The successful candidate will have:

• An accredited MLS or an advanced degree in the social sciences or equivalent combination of education and experience

• Demonstrated public service orientation and knowledge of user needs for teaching, learning, and research

• Demonstrated experience with US federal government documents, social sciences and international relations resources, including data sources

• Ability to work independently with varied user groups in a complex organization and function collaboratively in a rapidly changing team environment

• Excellent analytical, organizational, oral and written communications, and interpersonal skills

• Experience in webpage creation, and demonstrated ability to communicate/publish for the web/social media

• Demonstrated experience working with statistical datasets and the ability to effectively communicate with faculty, students and staff about textural, numerical and spatial data resources

• Demonstrated experience using quantitative research tools such as ArcGIS, Stata or R

Also highly desirable:

• Knowledgeable in the issues surrounding scholarly communications and data management planning

• Demonstrated experience using qualitative research tools such as NVivio or Atlas.ti

• Demonstrated experience using coding tools such as Javascript or Python

• Experience in identifying and evaluating software applications

Submit your application on-line at: http://academicjobs.columbia.edu/applicants/Central?quickFind=58604

One of the world's leading research universities, Columbia provides outstanding opportunities to work and grow in a unique intellectual community. Set in the Morningside Heights academic village, Columbia also presents the unmatched dynamism, diversity and cultural richness of New York City. The University Libraries, grounded in collections of remarkable depth and breadth, are also building extensive electronic resources and services. The Libraries at Columbia are committed to collegiality, professionalism, innovation and leadership.

We offer a salary commensurate with qualifications and excellent benefits.

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Discussion GODORT Buddy Program for Midwinter 2014!

by Sarah Erekson on Thu, Dec 12, 2013 at 08:05 pm

Learn something new in Philadelphia. Get a GODORT Buddy for Midwinter Meeting 2014 in Philadelphia! 

Park Ranger at Liberty Bell

 Photo Credit: National Park Service, Independence National Historical Park

Learn something new in Philadelphia. Get a GODORT Buddy for Midwinter Meeting 2014 in Philadelphia! 

Park Ranger at Liberty Bell

 Photo Credit: National Park Service, Independence National Historical Park

Interested in government information librarianship? Want to know more about what we do in GODORT? Get a Buddy! Sign up now!

The GODORT Buddy program was created to provide a personal introduction to the Government Documents Round Table. New and prospective GODORT members, as well as members becoming active for the first time or after a long absence are encouraged to request a GODORT Buddy.

We also need GODORT members to VOLUNTEER TO BE A BUDDY!

Share your knowledge and be a welcoming face for GODORT. Learn more about being a buddy; see the description on the Membership Committee wiki.

Other Details:

The Buddy pairing is for just one conference, so requires a low level of commitment, but means you’ll have an active GODORT member to answer all your questions and introduce you to other members at the GODORT Happy Hour & other events. You'll also receive a packet of information and GODORT goodies at the Happy Hour!

  • Sign up deadline: Friday January 17, 2014
  • Buddy pairing notification: Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Questions?? Please don't hesitate to contact me, Sarah Erekson, Membership Committee Chair

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The mission of the Government Documents Round Table (GODORT) is to (1) To provide a forum for discussion of problems, concerns, and for exchange of ideas by librarians working with government documents; (2) to provide a force for initiating and supporting programs to increase availability, use, and bibliographic control of documents; (3) to increase communication between documents librarians and other librarians; (4) to contribute to the extension and improvement of education and training of documents librarians.

Learn more about GODORT on the ALA website.

Subscribe to GODORT (Government Documents Round Table)