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Event Book and Paper Interest Group (ALCTS PARS): Risky Collections: Preservation, Access, and Issues of Diversity and Inclusion

by Jeanne Goodman (non-member) on Sun, Jun 25, 2017 at 12:27 pm

This session will discuss how some collection materials having to do with race, gender, sexual orientation, religion, and other sensitive topics can lead to challenging use cases and preservation decisions, and opportunities for difficult dialogue.

This session will discuss how some collection materials having to do with race, gender, sexual orientation, religion, and other sensitive topics can lead to challenging use cases and preservation decisions, and opportunities for difficult dialogue. Discussion format is three lightning rounds with a Q&A after each on: Preservation Decisions: Balancing the materiality and access needs of problematic items; Access for Classroom and Reading Room: Policies, Procedures and Workarounds; “Current Climate in Preservation and Conservation Profession: How are issues of diversity and inclusion being addressed?”

 

Format is 3 lightning rounds with topics introduced in 5 minute presentation and then opened up for Q&A and discussion for 15 minutes for each round. The session will conclude with general discussion.

 

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Discussion 2014 ALA Midwinter -- Technical Services Workflow Efficiency Interest Group meeting

by Michael Winecoff on Thu, Feb 20, 2014 at 07:10 am

Following is information on the Technical Services Workflow Efficiency Interest Group meeting held January 26, 2014 at 2014 ALA Midwinter:

Following is information on the Technical Services Workflow Efficiency Interest Group meeting held January 26, 2014 at 2014 ALA Midwinter:

Session one:
Title: Using MarcEdit and Excel to Identify Bibliographic Problems with Batchloaded Records
Presenter: Michael Winecoff, Associate University Librarian for Technical Services, UNC Charlotte
Synopsis: MARC records provided by vendors are often batchloaded without regard to checking for quality control. These records could have unknown problems that would otherwise go undetected making them inaccessible. This session shows one way using MarcEdit and Excel to quickly pull out key fields and scan for issues.

Session two:
Title: Adding XSLT to the cataloger’s toolbox: efficiencies for transforming and analyzing bibliographic data
Presenter: Annie Glerum, Head of Complex Cataloging, Florida State University Libraries
Synopsis: MarcEdit is extremely handy for editing and analyzing MARC files, however another useful program that can be tossed to the cataloger’s toolbox is EXtensible Stylesheet Language Transformations (XSLT). XSLT, which can be used in conjunction with MarcEdit, works with any XML-based metadata and can be customized for local needs. This introduction to XSLT covers metadata transformation to MARC21, quality control of vendor batch files, and XSLT code snippets.

Session three:
Title: A technology solution to process management: leveraging a Duke/IBM partnership
Presenter: Jacquie Samples, Head, Electronic Resources and Serials Cataloging Section, ERSM, Duke University Libraries
Synopsis: In the summer of 2013, a joint team involving the Duke University Libraries and IBM spent three months deploying and developing IBM’s Business Process Manager application framework (BPM) in the Libraries, showcasing the application's capabilities by transforming the way the Duke University Libraries manage subscriptions to online databases. The Libraries’ successful collaboration with IBM and the BPM platform has become a foundational experience for developing a suite of workflow tools in the Libraries, one that will help transform other operational processes and improve the Libraries’ quality of service in nearly every area. This presentation will describe the processes and problems that led up to this transformative project, will provide a brief overview of the BPM solution in action, and will discuss the broader potential of BPM as a process management solution for the Duke community.

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Event PARS Book and Paper Interest Group Meeting, ALA Annual 2014

by Beth Doyle on Wed, Jun 25, 2014 at 08:21 am

Sunday, June 29, 2014

1:00-2:30 pm

Caesar’s Palace - Trevi Room

 

2014: A (Library) Space Oddity

  

Beth Doyle and Dawn Aveline, co-chairs of the Book and Paper Interest Group, invite you to join us for an exciting series of fast-paced presentations focused around the theme of Curiosities and Oddities in the collections. 

 

Sunday, June 29, 2014

1:00-2:30 pm

Caesar’s Palace - Trevi Room

 

2014: A (Library) Space Oddity

  

Beth Doyle and Dawn Aveline, co-chairs of the Book and Paper Interest Group, invite you to join us for an exciting series of fast-paced presentations focused around the theme of Curiosities and Oddities in the collections. 

 

Everyone’s collections contain weird and wacky items that don’t fit neatly onto a shelf or into a standard workflow. These may be things that are very large or extremely tiny, artist’s books or altered books, ephemera, medical instruments, etc. These oddities pose challenges to preservation staff. How do you make the oddball, not-square item safely fit on the shelf? How do you repair things too large to fit in the press? What do you do with a book that is only 1-inch tall? And what about that issue of Décollage that contains a full-sized chocolate bar in a piece by Joseph Beuys?

 

Our speakers will be:

 

Veronica Sorcher, University of Cincinatti

Barbara Sagraves, Dartmouth College

Ann Kearney, University at Albany, SUNY

Nancy E. Kraft, University of Iowa

Moriah Niels, University of Washington

Jacob Nadal, ReCAP (The Research Collections and Preservation Consortium)

Miranda Nixon, University of Pittsburgh

Katherine Risseeuw, Northwestern University

 

Eight speakers will present in “IGNITE” style. Each presenter is allowed 15 slides which advance automatically after 20 seconds, for a total speaking time of 5 minutes. This format results in fun, engaging and energetic sessions. Presentations will be followed by Q&A. 

 

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File Evolution-of-cataloging-norms-from-ancient-Mesopotamia-to

by Ophelia Payne (non-member) on Mon, Mar 4, 2013 at 02:46 pm

PPTX File, 321.08 KB

File Valentino_ALASeattle

by Ophelia Payne (non-member) on Tue, Feb 12, 2013 at 08:12 am

PPTX File, 1.27 MB

Online Doc ALCTS Master Meeting Schedule for Midwinter & Annual 2013

by Dale Swensen on Wed, Oct 3, 2012 at 09:18 am

Here's the revised schedule for the coming year.

Discussion How do I post my interest group reports on Connect?

by Dale Swensen on Tue, Aug 23, 2011 at 01:20 pm
  • First, log in to Connect and then go to your IG Connect space.
  • In the right hand side bar, you'll notice a list of things that could be added to your space. You'll also see a question mark in brackets.  If you click on the question mark, it will explain all the different types of items and what they are used for. For a report on your meeting, you'll most likely want to use "Post."
  • Following the word "Post," is the word "add" in brackets. Click on that.
  • First, log in to Connect and then go to your IG Connect space.
  • In the right hand side bar, you'll notice a list of things that could be added to your space. You'll also see a question mark in brackets.  If you click on the question mark, it will explain all the different types of items and what they are used for. For a report on your meeting, you'll most likely want to use "Post."
  • Following the word "Post," is the word "add" in brackets. Click on that.
  • Enter or paste the title and body of the report in the appropriate spaces on the form. If you like, you can select or create one or more tags for the report. Tags represent categories to help you organize postings in your Connect space. For example, you might create a tag "Reports from our meetings at ALA Annual and Midwinter" to help you sort out these reports from other things that get posted in the space.
  • If you want the report to be available to others besides your own members, you can check the "Public" box.
  • If you wish, you can attach files to your report by clicking on "Add file attachments."
  • Finally, you have the option to preview what your post is going to look like before you actually submit it. To do that, click "Preview."
  • When you are satisfied and ready to post, click "Submit."

 

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Discussion Planning Your Meetings, or, "Programs vs. Managed Discussions"

by Dale Swensen on Mon, Aug 15, 2011 at 10:52 am

There are essentially three things you need to do in the coming year to prepare for your meetings:

There are essentially three things you need to do in the coming year to prepare for your meetings:

  • First, plan something to do at Midwinter and Annual. This could be anything from organized "table talks" to a group discussion, a panel of speakers, or a single invited speaker, or some combination of these. You might choose to make your Midwinter meeting a planning session for your meeting at Annual, where you get input from your group members on what they would like to have. Past meetings can probably given you some clues as to what works well with your group.
  •  Second, make sure you have a room scheduled at each meeting. If you need to submit a request there will be a deadline for that, and the ALCTS Office will send out an email well in advance to inform you. 
  • Third, get the word out so that people with interest will know what you are doing. If you don't do a formal program, you'll still have the opportunity to put announcements in ANO. The editor of ANO will issue a call for such announcements, so you will know when it's time. You can also send out message on email lists or any other means you have of reaching your members.

You only need to submit a program proposal if you want your meeting to be an official "program." The advantages of this are that the ALCTS Program Committee can make many of the arrangements for you and your program will be announced in the official ALA conference program.  Official programs can only be conducted at Annual. The deadline for submitting the proposal is the Annual Conference one year prior to the one at which the program will be presented, although the program committee is sometimes willing to consider late submissions. Contact the program committee chair if you are interested.   The alternative to doing a program is what is informally called a "managed discussion." For the most part, that just means that you are taking care of it on your own without involving the Program Committee. I suspect that is what most interest groups do. The content of the meeting could be essentially the same as a program, it's just that a description won't appear in the conference program and the Program Committee won't make any of the arrangements for you. For more information on programs and managed discussions, go to http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/alcts/mgrps/howto/grp_estiginfo.cfm  on the ALCTS web page.

 

 

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Discussion Finding a New Chair to Take Your Place

by Dale Swensen on Mon, Jul 11, 2011 at 12:44 pm

One of the most important things you can do to ensure continuity of your group is to find someone to replace you once the year is over.  The ALCTS bylaws say that “each group elects a chair annually,” but don’t take that to mean you have to hold an election. Sure, it’s good to conduct the process in the open and put out a call for volunteers, so that anyone who’s interested has a fair chance.  And it’s certainly not a bad idea to call for a show of hands (whether in a face-to-face meeting or virtually) in support of a nomination. 

One of the most important things you can do to ensure continuity of your group is to find someone to replace you once the year is over.  The ALCTS bylaws say that “each group elects a chair annually,” but don’t take that to mean you have to hold an election. Sure, it’s good to conduct the process in the open and put out a call for volunteers, so that anyone who’s interested has a fair chance.  And it’s certainly not a bad idea to call for a show of hands (whether in a face-to-face meeting or virtually) in support of a nomination. 

There’s nothing wrong, however, with simply asking someone if they’d be willing to do the job or accepting someone’s spontaneous offer to volunteer. This sometimes proves to be the best way, particularly if you have already sent out a call, but don’t get any takers.

Below are a few simple suggestions for interest group chairs who might be experiencing challenges when undertaking the task of finding someone to take their places.

First, there are some things you can do when your group is together at the Annual Conference or Midwinter:

  • Ask attendees if any of them would be willing to chair the group after your term ends.  Let them know what you have found rewarding about being a chair of an interest group.  If more than one person responds, have the group vote by show of hands, or consider having co-chairs.
  • Pay attention in your meetings to individuals who show particular enthusiasm for the discussion or interest in the group’s work—people you think would make good leaders.  Keep these people in mind—they’ll be good ones to contact later on if you don’t get any volunteers.  Make a point to note their names too, so you can identify them on your roster once you get home.

As well as some things to do after you return home:

  • Follow up (or initiate) your call for volunteers with an email to the group. If your group doesn’t have an established email list, use your roster to create one.  In your message, remind members what you said at the meeting: that directing an interest group can be an fun experience and you’d like to know who would accept the opportunity to lead in the coming year.
  • Wait a reasonable time—say two weeks.  By then if you get no responses, start contacting people individually.  This is where the list you made at your meeting of people who impressed you comes in handy. Make the contacts by email, phone, or even in person if you have the chance. You might say something like “I noticed at our meeting that you had some great ideas for our group. Would you be interested in chairing it for a year?”  You’ll be surprised to find that many people who might not volunteer are nonetheless willing to accept when asked personally.

Finally, remember that although you’re only required to have a chair for the group, it’s usually helpful to have a vice-chair as well. That means doing this process of identifying a chair a year before the person will actually be chair, so that they have a year to spend as vice-chair.  This has the advantage not only of reducing your workload by providing you with someone to help you out during your year as chair, but it also gives in incoming candidate a year to observe and see how things are done before taking the reins themselves.

 

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Discussion Transforming Collections Task Force

by Dale Swensen on Thu, Jun 30, 2011 at 12:45 pm

Attached you’ll find a report from the newly-formed ALCTS Transforming Collections Task Force. The report describes this task force and outlines its purpose and goals, which are to support the ALA goal of "providing leadership in the transformation of libraries and library services in a dynamic and increasing global digital information environment." 

Attached you’ll find a report from the newly-formed ALCTS Transforming Collections Task Force. The report describes this task force and outlines its purpose and goals, which are to support the ALA goal of "providing leadership in the transformation of libraries and library services in a dynamic and increasing global digital information environment." 

Also included in the report is a list of topics related to collection transformation.  ALCTS President Cynthia Whitacre has asked that I pass this information on to you so that you can begin thinking about how to incorporate this theme into you meetings for the coming year.  As you do so, please consider sharing your ideas with other interest group chairs by posting a message in Connect or on the Alcts-ig list.

 

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