Latest From All Groups

View:   Faces | List | By Group
2009 ALA Annual Conference [Event]

Online Doc Slides and Audio from "Pay-Per-View Options: Is Transactional Access Right For My Institution?" (ALCTS Electronic Resources Interest Group)

by Adam Burling (staff) on Tue, Jan 19, 2010 at 03:33 pm

(links to the audio file and PDF versions of the slides are at the end of this post)

The ALCTS CCS Electronic Resources Interest Group presented a panel discussion "Pay-Per-View Options: Is Transactional Access Right For My Institution?" on Saturday, July 11, 2009, from 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Presenters and participants shared their experiences and questions related to providing access to journal content without submitting their bottom lines to costly and sometimes little-used journal subscriptions.

The panel included:

(links to the audio file and PDF versions of the slides are at the end of this post)

The ALCTS CCS Electronic Resources Interest Group presented a panel discussion "Pay-Per-View Options: Is Transactional Access Right For My Institution?" on Saturday, July 11, 2009, from 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Presenters and participants shared their experiences and questions related to providing access to journal content without submitting their bottom lines to costly and sometimes little-used journal subscriptions.

The panel included:

Pay Per View – Where We Were, Where We Are and Where Are We Going Next?

Beth R. Bernhardt, Presenter
Jackson Library
University of North Carolina at Greensboro

ABSTRACT:

Between 2002 and 2003, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) set up several different types of pay-per-view options that provided users with over 3,500 unsubscribed titles.  A few years later the library set up access to many of these titles through Consortium Big Deals. This presentation will talk about what options the library experimented with, what is still there, compare its pay-per-view statistics with its big deals and discuss how libraries might use pay-per-view options in the coming years.

Developing a Pay-Per-View Model in a Financially Challenging Budget Year

Nicole Mitchell and Elizabeth Lorbeer, Presenters
Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences
University of Alabama at Birmingham

ABSTRACT:

Anticipated reductions at the University of Alabama, Birmingham, for fiscal year 2009/2010 will result in a content budget of roughly half what it was four years ago. The library went from having packages with almost every commercial and society publisher to just a few packages in 2009. Over 4,500 titles were cancelled for 2009, with only 52 journals being reinstated by user request. In exploring a solution for next fiscal year, the library began to investigate investing twenty percent of its journal budget to subsidized pay-per-view by setting up deposit accounts with the publishers, with a goal to significantly lower user fees for article access.  

Fast Food Nation/Google Generation/Financial Down Turn ... Meet the Library

Ryan Weir and Ashley Ireland, Presenters
Murray State University
Murray, Kentucky

ABSTRACT:

Murray State University recently initiated a project that will be the inaugural step in its transition to both providing optimized digital access and changing the landscape of its journal acquisitions from a model that has been traditionally print to one that is primarily electronic.  Alongside this transition, the library recently added a just-in-time element to its previous just-in-case-only model. The presentation also addressed the driving forces behind the library's decisions, its selection of Science Direct as a vendor, the implementation process, the outcomes, and where the library sees itself headed in the future.

Transactional Access: A Publisher's Take

Mark Rothenbuhler
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

ABSTRACT:

The final presentation offered the perspective of a major publisher about its experiences offering streamlined article access via prepaid tokens, including the realities and potential benefits of transactional access to journal articles to libraries and publishers, plus suggestions as to what libraries should be thinking about.   

Following the presentations, several participants asked questions and shared their own experiences.

Click here to listen to the entire panel presentation (1 hour, 12 minutes).

More...
AASL (The American Association of School Librarians)

Discussion Feedback sought on ALA/AASL Standards for Initial Programs for School Librarian Preparation

by Stephanie Book (staff) on Tue, Apr 6, 2010 at 05:15 pm

Feedback sought on ALA/AASL Standards for Initial Programs for School Librarian Preparation

Feedback sought on ALA/AASL Standards for Initial Programs for School Librarian Preparation

CHICAGO – The American Association of School Librarians (AASL), a division of the American Library Association (ALA), welcomes comments from school librarians, educators and students at school librarianship programs on the draft revised ALA/AASL Standards for Initial Programs for School Librarian Preparation. Review the draft revised standards and submit comments via survey at www.ala.org/aasl/NCATEstandards. Comments will be collected until August 1, 2010.

The National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) has a seven-year review cycle for program standards. As part of the process for revising the standards, the AASL/NCATE Coordinating Committee seeks feedback from a wide range of constituents. The revised program standards reflect newly published learning standards and program guidelines in the field. Major changes in the revised standards include:  

  • highlighting “Teaching for Learning” as the first standard, reflecting the key teaching role of the school librarian;
  • including collaboration and the role of instructional partner under the “Teaching for Learning” standard;
  • presenting both “Literacy and Reading” and “Advocacy and Leadership” as separate standards, reflecting the importance of each in the field; and
  • the addition of Professional Ethics as an element under the “Program Management and Administration” standard.

Final approval of the revised standards is expected in October 2010. Beginning with the fall 2012 semester, all programs must be reviewed using the new standards. Open hearings on the draft revised standards were held at ALA 2009 Annual Conference and 2010 Midwinter Meeting. Comments received at those hearings have been taken into consideration by the standards committee.

ALA policy states that for school librarians, the appropriate first professional degree is either a master's degree from a program accredited by ALA or a master's degree with a specialty in school librarianship from a program recognized by AASL in an NCATE-accredited educational unit. NCATE accreditation with AASL national recognition is an assurance of quality for programs in school librarianship. These standards are the basis for AASL/NCATE program review and the process leading to the decision that a program meets standards and should receive national recognition. The standards describe what proficient candidates should know and be able to do as they complete their program.

For more information on AASL/NCATE recognition and the standards approval process, to review the draft ALA/AASL Standards for Initial Programs for School Librarian Preparation or to complete the comments survey, visit www.ala.org/aasl/NCATEstandards.

The American Association of School Librarians, www.aasl.org, a division of the American Library Association (ALA), promotes the improvement and extension of library services in elementary and secondary schools as a means of strengthening the total education program. Its mission is to advocate excellence, facilitate change and develop leaders in the school library field.

###

More...
AASL (The American Association of School Librarians)

Discussion Diversity Research Grant program

by Stephanie Book (staff) on Tue, Apr 6, 2010 at 04:42 pm

The American Library Association (ALA) Office for Diversity and the Diversity Research Grants Advisory Committee seek proposals for the Diversity Research Grant program.  Applicants must be current ALA members and 2010 proposals must address one of three identified topics:

The American Library Association (ALA) Office for Diversity and the Diversity Research Grants Advisory Committee seek proposals for the Diversity Research Grant program.  Applicants must be current ALA members and 2010 proposals must address one of three identified topics:

  • Upward mobility of Library Leaders from Underrepresented Populations
  • Information Services and Collections for Diverse Children and Young Adults
  • Libraries and the Meaning of Multiculturalism

The Diversity Research Grant consists of a one-time $2,000 award for original research and a $500 travel grant to attend and present at the 2011 ALA Annual Conference. A jury of ALA members will evaluate proposals and is encouraged to award one proposal from each of this year’s topics for a total of three awards.  Grant recipients will be announced ahead of the 2010 ALA Annual Conference and will be expected to compile the results of their research into a presentation for the 2011 ALA Annual Conference in New Orleans, LA.   The application deadline is April 30.  Only proposals demonstrating relevance to the 2010 research topics will be considered.

A complete proposal must include the following: a cover letter, a one-page vita for each of the researchers involved, a concise abstract of the project and a description of the project detailing the justification and needs for the research project, research objectives, expected outcomes and benefits, budget plan and timeline.

For a complete list of the criteria on which proposals will be evaluated, please visit: http://www.ala.org/ala/aboutala/offices/diversity/divresearchgrants/diversityresearch.cfm

Persons submitting a proposal must be current ALA members. If you are not presently a member of ALA, but wish to submit a proposal, please visit http://www.ala.org/membership/ for information on becoming a member. Applicants must supply membership ID numbers with proposals.

Submissions should be sent by mail to the ALA Office for Diversity, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, IL 60611.  Electronic submissions are preferred and should be submitted in a Word document attachment. Email electronic submissions to diversity@ala.org.

More...
AASL (The American Association of School Librarians)

Discussion Circulate This: Stories from the School Library

by Stephanie Book (staff) on Tue, Apr 6, 2010 at 04:11 pm

Circulate This: Stories from the School Library

Listen to this! The California School Library Association released an audio journal, "Circulate this: Stories from the School Library", which is packed with powerful stories about school libraries.  Visit http://csla.net/audio.

School Library Month 2010

Discussion National Library Workers Day - April 13

by Stephanie Book (staff) on Tue, Apr 6, 2010 at 03:01 pm

There are so many things you can do to celebrate National Library Workers Day on Tuesday, April 13! 

There are so many things you can do to celebrate National Library Workers Day on Tuesday, April 13! 

 

More...
Information Commons Discussion Group (ACRL)

Discussion Midwinter 2010--Boston Discussion Group Minutes

by Michael Whitchurch on Tue, Apr 6, 2010 at 02:41 pm

Information Commons Discussion Group

Saturday, January 16, 2010

10:30 a.m. – 12 noon

Marriott Copley, Grand Ballroom F

(Approximately 50 attendees)

Ewa Barczyk, Director of Libraries at the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee gave a presentation on the development and implementation of the Daniel M. Soref Learning Commons, which opened in 2009.  See http://www4.uwm.edu/libraries/commons/ for more information.

Discussion topic:  Multimedia in the Commons. 

Information Commons Discussion Group

Saturday, January 16, 2010

10:30 a.m. – 12 noon

Marriott Copley, Grand Ballroom F

(Approximately 50 attendees)

Ewa Barczyk, Director of Libraries at the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee gave a presentation on the development and implementation of the Daniel M. Soref Learning Commons, which opened in 2009.  See http://www4.uwm.edu/libraries/commons/ for more information.

Discussion topic:  Multimedia in the Commons. 

  • How do we promote our multimedia capabilities to the faculty and students in a way that integrates with curricular activities? 
  • Do we try to lead the way or wait for the curriculum to guide implementation? 
  • How do we support visual/media literacy with multimedia instruction in the commons?”

Table discussion reports:

Table #1 –   UW-Stevens Point purchased a Wii and offers Wii study breaks during mid-terms and finals.   Also highlighted was their “Idea Studio,” which is a collaborative group project room equipped with a 54” TV, speakers, a projector/screen, PC, digital video camera and more.  Students use the space for group projects, presentation practice, presentation filming, and media viewing.

Table #2 --   Discussion focused around encouraging and supporting faculty early adopters.  Recommended working with faculty on determining how to grade multimedia submissions; if the library is an active partner, word will spread.

 

Table #3 --   This group agreed with previous statements about working with faculty.  Encourage librarians to take every opportunity to talk to classes about multimedia/technology capabilities, including copyright.  “Assessment is huge;” tie learning outcomes to classes.

 

Table #4 --   Strong suggestion was made to incorporate media production into faculty pedagogy so that they can learn to integrate it into their courses.  Also discussed was how to select the best media resources for each institution.

 

Table #5 --   Recommend teaching media production skills.  Northeastern University’s Digital Media Design Studio has been very successful with this (see www.lib.neu.edu/dmds).   Also, it was announced that the ALA Video Round Table is creating a Multimedia Discussion Group.

 

Table #6 --   Development and services of the Digital Media Studio at Youngstown State University was highlighted, including discussion of their podcasting booths/video studios, digitizing rooms, and other services.  iPods have been used for library tours and for developing discipline-specific research guides.

 

Table #7 --   The question was raised whether people outside of libraries understand the term “visual media literacy.”  Agreed with previous comments that multimedia development must be integrated with the faculty, with libraries providing support, to be truly successful.  Considered whether there might be any compatibilities with visual media literacy and language learning.  Further raised the question, “How can we help bring together the digital expertise that is spread out over campus?”

 

Table #8 --   Raised the question of how best to incorporate the library/campus IT into the multimedia development group.  Also mentioned that in some institutions the library is developing the campus copyright policy.

More...
School Library Month 2010

Discussion SLM 2010 video contest winner - "We Thrive"

by Stephanie Book (staff) on Tue, Apr 6, 2010 at 10:46 am

And the SLM video contest winner is...

"We Thrive" - Ali Schilpp of Sudbrook Magnet Middle in Baltimore, MD

AASL thanks all members who submitted to the SLM 2010 video contest, and all school librarians helping to promote the 25th anniversary of School Library Month! Visit the AASL Website to view all four contest videos for School Library Month 2010. 

Union Library Workers

Discussion Fla teachers [and school librarians] line up to testify against bill

by Kathleen McCook on Tue, Apr 6, 2010 at 05:03 am

 

See Florida Education Association updates here.

 

Fla teachers [and school librarians] line up to testify against bill

By MARTIN MERZER

They arrived early, found strength in numbers but shared a sense of futility, their legislative battle almost assuredly lost even before they awakened Monday.

 

See Florida Education Association updates here.

 

Fla teachers [and school librarians] line up to testify against bill

By MARTIN MERZER

They arrived early, found strength in numbers but shared a sense of futility, their legislative battle almost assuredly lost even before they awakened Monday.

But hundreds of Florida teachers gathered in the halls of the state Capitol anyway, lining up to testify before a House committee against a bill they believe could damage Florida's educational system and ruin many of their careers -- a bill that links teacher pay increases to student test scores and ends tenure for new teachers.

They carried signs and wore buttons: "Legislators Need to Do Their Homework" and "I teach, I vote." ...

The Senate approved the measure 10 days earlier. The Republican majority bulldozed its identical version through an earlier House committee test. The governor has expressed approval."...

Teachers say they agree that accountability should be enhanced. Most maintain, however, that the proposal is a blunt instrument that carries significant weight but fails to account for the realities of the classroom and offers few details about how teachers will be measured.

Amanda Babcock and her husband, Jack, traveled to the Capitol from Port St. Lucie. Both are teachers. They brought their two infant children.

"You know, I can pray that it ends in my favor," Amanda Babcock said, "that it ends with them saying, 'We listened to the cry of the teachers, we listened to them pleading for help, and we are going to listen to them and kill this bill.' But it's not looking very good right now.

"But at least we can say that we tried," she said, "and we did what we could do."

More...
ALA Dance Party

dance

by JP Porcaro on Mon, Apr 5, 2010 at 02:06 pm

Pages