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ALA Emerging Leaders Interest Group

Discussion 2011 Emerging Leaders application process now open

by Peter Bromberg on Thu, May 27, 2010 at 02:02 pm

For Immediate Release
Tue, 05/25/2010 – 22:03

Contact: Beatrice Calvin
Human Resource Development and Recruitment (HRDR)

For Immediate Release
Tue, 05/25/2010 – 22:03

Contact: Beatrice Calvin
Human Resource Development and Recruitment (HRDR)

CHICAGO – The American Library Association (ALA) is now accepting applications for the 2011 class of Emerging Leaders.  Applications can be found at http://www.ala.org/cfapps/emergingleaders/index.cfm. The deadline to apply is July 30.

The program is designed to enable a group of library workers to get on the fast track to ALA and professional leadership.  Participants are given the opportunity to work on a variety of projects, network with peers and get an inside look into the ALA structure and activities.

An ALA division, round table, ethnic affiliate, state chapter or school library media affiliate will sponsor many of the selected applicants.  Each sponsor will contribute $1,000 toward expenses ($500 for each conference).  Sponsorship is not required for participation in the program.

Applicants can indicate on the application which groups they want to consider them for sponsorship.  A list of sponsoring units is included as part of the online application. You can also check with your state association and/or state chapter to find out if they are participating and how to apply for their sponsorship.

Library support staff are encouraged to apply to the program and will have an opportunity to be considered for sponsorship through the ALA Library Support Staff Interests Round Table.

No more than one person from any institution will be selected for participation in the program.  Preference will be given to those who do not have experience working on ALA committees, task forces, etc.and to those who meet the following criteria:

  1. Be under 35 years of age or be a library worker of any age with fewer than five years experience working in a library, and
  2. Be able to attend both ALA conferences and work virtually in between each,
  3. Be prepared to commit to serve on either an ALA, division, chapter or round table committee, taskforce or workgroup, or in your state or local professional library organization upon completion of program and
  4. Be an ALA member or join upon selection if not already a member.

For questions or more information regarding the program, contact Beatrice Calvin at bcalvin@ala.org.

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The American Dream Starts @ your library

Discussion American Dream @ El Paso Public Library

by Ivonne Jimenez (non-member) on Thu, May 27, 2010 at 01:31 pm

Hello, my name is Ivonne Jimenez.  The El Paso Public Library-Bookmobile is very grateful to have been awarded this grant.  The El Paso Public Library system has 13 branches and 1 bookmobile.  The bookmobile has been a part of EPPL since 1957, when it was implemented to identify areas needing library service.  It provides an essential service through literacy outreach for those individuals who are not comfortable in the traditional educational institutions and are trying to achieve a superior quality of life.

Hello, my name is Ivonne Jimenez.  The El Paso Public Library-Bookmobile is very grateful to have been awarded this grant.  The El Paso Public Library system has 13 branches and 1 bookmobile.  The bookmobile has been a part of EPPL since 1957, when it was implemented to identify areas needing library service.  It provides an essential service through literacy outreach for those individuals who are not comfortable in the traditional educational institutions and are trying to achieve a superior quality of life.

The Bookmobile, through this grant, can enhance its literacy collection and with two wireless computer laptops would enable adults to improve their literacy skills, and take online courses, i.e., Learning Express, to acquire new employment skills.  This funding will also allow the Bookmobile to visit new low-income areas, encourage customers to apply for a library card and make them aware of library resources.

We’re very excited about this grant and look forward to all the wonderful opportunities this funding will provide our community.

Thank you, Dollar General and ALA!!

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The American Dream Starts @ your library

Discussion American Dream Starts @ you library

by Judith Sutton A. on Thu, May 27, 2010 at 01:20 pm

Hello, everyone. I'm Judith Sutton, Head of Children's Services at the Mt. Lebanon Public Library in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. We are delighted to be one of the recipients of this year's grants. Our community has a growing number of Chinese and Eastern European families, as well as Indian and Pakistani. For the past several years, we have been working with the ESL teachers in the school district to faciltate an evening when newly arrived families are invited to the library for a tour and introduced to the library's services.

Hello, everyone. I'm Judith Sutton, Head of Children's Services at the Mt. Lebanon Public Library in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. We are delighted to be one of the recipients of this year's grants. Our community has a growing number of Chinese and Eastern European families, as well as Indian and Pakistani. For the past several years, we have been working with the ESL teachers in the school district to faciltate an evening when newly arrived families are invited to the library for a tour and introduced to the library's services. In addition, we work with the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council and provide space not only for tutor training, but also for one on one instruction for the tutor and student learning English. One of our goals with this grant is to offer programs that provide information about dealing with American life for recent emigrees. In the months to come, I will be working with Cynthia Richey, our director, several staff members, the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council and the ESL teachers in the school district to devise ways to reach out to this community and make the library more user-friendly  and attuned to the needs of this culturally diverse population.

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ALCTS PARS Digital Conversion Interest Group

Discussion Digital Conversion Interest Group Meeting at ALA 2010

by Janet Ahrberg on Thu, May 27, 2010 at 12:03 pm

Please join us for the ALCTS/PARS Digital Conversion Interest Group meeting on Saturday, June 26, 1:30-3:30 pm at the JW Marriott Hotel (Capitol)- BR H/J

Featured speakers:

Please join us for the ALCTS/PARS Digital Conversion Interest Group meeting on Saturday, June 26, 1:30-3:30 pm at the JW Marriott Hotel (Capitol)- BR H/J

Featured speakers:

Peter Alyea, Digital Conservation Specialist at the Library of Congress, will be sharing the Library's latest research into 3D imaging and digitization of analog audio discs. The research revolves around a system called IRENE, which can transform damaged and old records into digital audio. IRENE has the potential to help preserve thousands of records which are currently unplayable via a conventional needle and turntable. 

For more information about the IRENE project, please visit http://irene.lbl.gov/

Also see NPR's report on the project at http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=11851842

 Leslie Johnston, Manager of Technical Architecture Initiatives with the National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program (NDIIPP), will address an overview of the program’s current initiatives, including distributed preservation, use of “the cloud,” and the documentation and validation of file formats. 

 New co-chairs wanted:

 We will also be electing new co-chairs. If you are interested, please attend the meeting or you may contact: Janet Ahrberg at janet.ahrberg@okstate.edu or Preston Cabe at prestoncabe@georgebloodaudio.com  

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ALCTS CRS Access to Continuing Resources Interest Group

Discussion ALA 2010 Annual: Re-thinking library business model for licensed digital contents under mobile and cloud computing

by Lai-Ying Hsiung (non-member) on Thu, May 27, 2010 at 10:28 am

The ALCTS CRS Access to Continuing Resources Interest Group invites you to attend:

Re-thinking library business model for licensed digital contents under mobile and cloud computing
Sunday, June 27, 2010, 4:00-5:30 p.m.
JW Marriott-Grand BR III

The ALCTS CRS Access to Continuing Resources Interest Group invites you to attend:

Re-thinking library business model for licensed digital contents under mobile and cloud computing
Sunday, June 27, 2010, 4:00-5:30 p.m.
JW Marriott-Grand BR III

Exponential growth of mobile devices require libraries, vendors and publishers to re-think how to enhance user experience with library licensed digital collections on the go. As Google Editions allows the physical download of the digital into something tangible, challenging our notion of "ownership", how are we going to rewrite business rules?  Come and hear our panelists' perspectives on this issue and possible future trends:

Melissa Blaney, Publications Division Lead Web Analyst, American Chemical Society.
Chris Palma, Strategic Partner Development Manager, Google.
Michael Porter, Communications Manager, WebJunction.

Please join us for a lively discussion!

For more information, please contact Lai-Ying Hsiung (chair,
lhsiung@ucsc.edu)or Heather Staines (vice-chair,
Heather.Staines@springer.com)of Access to Continuing Resources Interest Group.

Brief Bios:

Melissa Blaney, Publications Division Lead Web Analyst,American Chemical Society. Among other roles, Melissa creates internal web usage reports for the Publications management team, maintains standards and integrity of institutional customer usage reports, and monitors the discoverability of ACS content via key pathways while tracking user behavior. She has been with ACS since 2008 and has 9 years of experience within the publishing industry, previously serving in editorial and business roles for Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, /Washington Life/ magazine and /Psychology Today /magazine.

Chris Palma, Strategic Partner Development Manager, Google. He is responsible for Google Books partnerships in the
Western U.S., India, Australia, and New Zealand.  The Google Books Partner Program now has over 30,000 publisher partners world-wide, representing over 2 million full-text books discoverable from the Google index in over 70 international domains. Prior to joining Google, Chris was Vice President of Content and Business Development for ebrary. He was Sales Director at Harvard University Press, during a scholarly publishing career that spanned 15 years. 

Michael Porter, Communications Manager, WebJunction, has 20 years of experience working in Libraryland. In 2009 he was selected as a Library Journal "Mover & Shaker" and his work is motivated by "mobile computing" and its impending impact on library futures. He is working on a book about successful electronic communities for ALA Editions, co-authors the "Internet Spotlight" column in each issue of Public Libraries Magazine and also teaches the "Technology Planning" course for PLA's "Certified Public Library Administrator Program."  Michael is starting a non-profit organization to help libraries
more effectively deal with the intersection of technology, content access and libraries.

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ALCTS PARS Preservation Administration Interest Group

Discussion Annual '10 Preservation Administrators Interest Group Agenda

by Adrienne Bell (non-member) on Thu, May 27, 2010 at 10:08 am

Preservation Administrators Interest Group (PAIG) Agenda
Annual 2010, Washington DC

Friday, June 25, 2010
1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Mayflower Renaissance, Colonial Room 

Chair: Adrienne Bell, Etherington Conservation Services

Preservation Administrators Interest Group (PAIG) Agenda
Annual 2010, Washington DC

Friday, June 25, 2010
1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Mayflower Renaissance, Colonial Room 

Chair: Adrienne Bell, Etherington Conservation Services

1:00 – 1:10       Welcome, Karen Brown, PARS Chair, SUNY Albany
1:10 – 1:15       Memorial, Patricia Morris, University of Colorado
1:15 – 1:45       “Future of Library and Archives Conservation Education,” Roberta Pilette, Yale University, and Beth Doyle, Duke 
                          University
1:45 – 2:45       “Research on Sustainable Preservation Environments at IPI,” James Reilly, Image Permanence Institute
2:45 – 3:15       “From Surveys to Auditing: Extensible Methods for Preservation Assessment,” Jacob Nadal, University of California, 
                          Los Angeles
3:15 – 3:45       Break, refreshments provided by Bridgeport National Bindery
3:45 – 4:30       “Faculty Attitudes on a Print to Electronic Transition for Scholarly Materials,” Ross Housewright & Roger Schonfeld, 
                          Ithaka S+R
4:30 – 4:40        IMLS Preservation Fellows at the New York Public Library and Yale University, Roberta Pilette, Yale University, and 
                          Evelyn Frangakis, New York Public Library
4:40 – 5:00        Election of new co-chair and announcements

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ALA Intellectual Freedom Committee

Discussion Prisoners' Right to Read: An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights

by Nanette Perez (staff) on Wed, Mar 31, 2010 at 03:13 pm

Below is a draft of Prisoners' Right to Read: An Interpretation to the Library Bill of Rights that the Intellectual Freedom Committee adopted during its Spring Meeting.

Below is a draft of Prisoners' Right to Read: An Interpretation to the Library Bill of Rights that the Intellectual Freedom Committee adopted during its Spring Meeting.

DRAFT

Prisoners’ Right to Read

An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights

The American Library Association asserts a compelling public interest in the preservation of intellectual freedom for individuals of any age held in jails, prisons, detention facilities, juvenile facilities, immigration facilities, prison work camps and segregated units within any facility. As Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall wrote in Procunier v Martinez [416 US 428 (1974)]:

When the prison gates slam behind an inmate, he does not lose his human quality; his mind does not become closed to ideas; his intellect does not cease to feed on a free and open interchange of opinions; his yearning for self-respect does not end; nor is his quest for self-realization concluded.  If anything, the needs for identity and self-respect are more compelling in the dehumanizing prison environment.

Participation in a democratic society requires unfettered access to current social, political, economic, cultural, scientific, and religious information. Information and ideas available outside the prison are essential to prisoners for a successful transition to freedom. Learning to be free requires access to a wide range of knowledge, and suppression of ideas does not prepare the incarcerated of any age for life in a free society. Even those individuals that a lawful society chooses to imprison permanently deserve access to information, to literature, and to a window on the world.

Correctional facility libraries may be required by federal, state, or local laws; administrative rules of parent agencies; or court decisions to prohibit material that instructs, incites, or advocates criminal action or bodily harm or is a violation of the law. Although these limits can restrict the range of material available, the extent of limitation should be minimized by adherence to the Library Bill of Rights and its Interpretations. Library policy should be based on legal principles specifying that such exclusion must be reasonably related to legitimate penological objectives [Turner v Safley, 482 U.S. 78 (1987) and Thornburgh v Abbott, 490 U.S. 401 (1989)]. Prohibiting material for any other reason constitutes unwarranted censorship. 

Censorship is an exclusive process by which authority rejects specific points of view. That material contains unpopular views or even repugnant content does not provide justification for censorship. Altering a publication is a form of censorship and should be employed only when a minimal amount of material is expurgated for legitimate penological interests and will ultimately allow the prisoner access to a document that would otherwise be excluded in whole. Unlike censorship, selection is an inclusive process that involves the search for materials, regardless of format, that represent diversity and a broad spectrum of ideas. Accepting that fiscal reality places limits on collection development, the correctional library collection should reflect the needs of its community.

These principles should guide all libraries serving prisoners:

  • Collection management should be governed by written policy, mutually agreed upon by librarians and correctional agency administrators, in accordance with the Library Bill of Rights, its Interpretations, and other ALA intellectual freedom documents.
  • Correctional libraries should have written procedures for addressing challenges to library materials in accordance with “Challenged Materials” and other relevant intellectual freedom documents.
  • Correctional librarians should select materials that reflect the demographic composition, information needs, interests, and diverse cultural values of the confined communities they serve. As stated in “Free Access to Libraries for Minors,” age is not a reason for censorship.  Incarcerated children and youth should have access to a wide range of fiction and nonfiction. 
  • Correctional librarians should be allowed to purchase materials that meet written selection criteria without prior correctional agency review. They should be allowed to acquire materials from a wide range of sources in order to ensure a broad and diverse collection.
  • Correctional libraries should not be limited to purchasing from a list of approved materials.  A library’s function is to provide for the multi-faceted needs of its population, rather than collect only materials that support the values and mission of the agency or its management.
  • The correctional library should make all reasonable efforts to provide sufficient materials to meet the information and recreational needs of prisoners who speak languages other than English.
  • Equitable access to information should be provided for persons with disabilities as outlined in “Services to People with Disabilities.”
  • If a correctional agency prohibits items, it should describe disqualifying physical features or provide a list that: 1) includes bibliographic citations to the exact edition, volume, or issue censored, 2) references specific passages of text, and 3) cites the rule that the passage or feature violates.
  • Media or materials with non-traditional bindings should not be prohibited unless they present legitimate security concerns for the correctional facility.
  • Material with sexual content should not be banned unless it violates state and federal law.
  • In correctional facilities that do not permit prisoners to use the Internet, the correctional library should provide alternate access to information available only online.

When free people, through judicial procedure, segregate some of their own, they incur the responsibility to provide humane treatment and essential rights.  Among these is the right to read. The right to choose what to read is deeply important, and the suppression of ideas is fatal to a democratic society. The denial of the right to read, to write, and to think—to intellectual freedom—diminishes the human spirit of those segregated from society. Those who cherish their full freedom and rights should work to guarantee that the right to intellectual freedom is extended to all incarcerated individuals.

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RUSA STARS (Sharing and Transforming Access to Resource Section)

Event STARS chat: 5 Things

by Nora Dethloff on Thu, May 27, 2010 at 09:25 am

RUSA STARS presents a chat about The Five Things a New Resource Sharing Librarian Should Know.

Please join us on Thursday, June 10th at 2 p.m. Eastern for the first ever RUSA STARS simultaneous chat session. We’ll be discussing the “Five Things” initiative, and deliberating / debating the five most important things a new resource sharing librarian should know. 

RUSA STARS presents a chat about The Five Things a New Resource Sharing Librarian Should Know.

Please join us on Thursday, June 10th at 2 p.m. Eastern for the first ever RUSA STARS simultaneous chat session. We’ll be discussing the “Five Things” initiative, and deliberating / debating the five most important things a new resource sharing librarian should know. 

RUSA STARS has launched an initiative to discover the most important Five Things a new resource sharing librarian needs to know.  We’ve been gathering ideas far & wide, and now is the time to start discussing, debating, and narrowing down. Eventually, we will be creating a “Five Things” website, which will be a tool for anyone new to the field.

What do you wish you’d known when you first started in resource sharing? What things did you have to learn the “hard way”? Now is your chance to pass that hard-won knowledge on to others. Help us to give form and focus to the “Five Things” by taking part in the Five Things chat!

To join the discussion:

  1. Go to http://connect.ala.org/chatrooms/chat/774
  2. Log in using your ALA Connect username & password
  3. Start chatting!

For more information on the Five Things chat, please contact Nora Dethloff, STARS Membership Committee Chair, at ndethloff@uh.edu .

 

 

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RUSA STARS (Sharing and Transforming Access to Resource Section)

Discussion STARS chat: The Five Things a New Resource Sharing Librarian Should Know.

by Nora Dethloff on Thu, May 27, 2010 at 09:22 am

RUSA STARS presents a chat about The Five Things a New Resource Sharing Librarian Should Know.

Please join us on Thursday, June 10th at 2 p.m. Eastern for the first ever RUSA STARS simultaneous chat session. We’ll be discussing the “Five Things” initiative, and deliberating / debating the five most important things a new resource sharing librarian should know. 

RUSA STARS presents a chat about The Five Things a New Resource Sharing Librarian Should Know.

Please join us on Thursday, June 10th at 2 p.m. Eastern for the first ever RUSA STARS simultaneous chat session. We’ll be discussing the “Five Things” initiative, and deliberating / debating the five most important things a new resource sharing librarian should know. 

RUSA STARS has launched an initiative to discover the most important Five Things a new resource sharing librarian needs to know.  We’ve been gathering ideas far & wide, and now is the time to start discussing, debating, and narrowing down. Eventually, we will be creating a “Five Things” website, which will be a tool for anyone new to the field.

What do you wish you’d known when you first started in resource sharing? What things did you have to learn the “hard way”? Now is your chance to pass that hard-won knowledge on to others. Help us to give form and focus to the “Five Things” by taking part in the Five Things chat!

To join the discussion:

  1. Go to http://connect.ala.org/chatrooms/chat/774
  2. Log in using your ALA Connect username & password
  3. Start chatting!

For more information on the Five Things chat, please contact Nora Dethloff, STARS Membership Committee Chair, at ndethloff@uh.edu .

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