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Librarians who Love Cats (& dogs & other pets)

Discussion Should libraries keep pets?

by Diane Chen on Sun, Nov 15, 2009 at 08:33 pm

My Library Club recently decided they want to petition the principal to allow them to have a "library pet." They are gathering information about the types of pets, number of libraries that have them, safety and health concerns, and other issues they will face. They have asked me to ask you about this since they want to be able to refute any arguments knowledgeably. 

ALCTS Program Committee (Association for Library Collections and Technical Services)

Discussion ALCTS Programs & Pre-Conferences 2010

by Joyce McDonough on Thu, Jan 28, 2010 at 04:34 pm

The attached Excel workbook provides information about the programs and pre-conferences scheduled for the ALA Annual Conference in Washington, DC from June 25-June 29, 2010.  The program sessions are scheduled for Saturday, Sunday, & Monday of that period.

ACRL ULS (University Libraries Section)

Discussion A suggested protocol for conducting online chat meetings

by Kim Leeder Reed on Thu, Jan 28, 2010 at 03:53 pm
Note: Patricia Smith, Executive Director of the Texas Library Association, shared the following with me (which she received from someone else) and I thought I would pass it on. -Kim Leeder

The following is how we conducted the online chats.

Note: Patricia Smith, Executive Director of the Texas Library Association, shared the following with me (which she received from someone else) and I thought I would pass it on. -Kim Leeder

The following is how we conducted the online chats.

  1. Prior to chat, the agenda, moderator and protocol for responding is established and delivered via email.
  2. Upon logging into most chat rooms, you can see who has logged in first and so on.  This is how the moderator knows who gets the first opportunity to respond.
  3. The moderator begins his discussion and allows the first person who logged in to respond first.
  4. The next in line can respond accordingly or type "still thinking, pass" (or something similar). It then goes to the next person for a response (round robin style).  The moderator can also give the next in line ten seconds to respond and if nothing comes through, then the next person can jump in.

It may appear that it would go slowly, but it doesn't.  You can see when your turn comes up next, and very often someone has already asked the same question or made a similar statement so there is no need to repeat yourself and moves the chat along.  When we "chatted" in our UNT classes, there would be twenty of us in an online chat and it flowed very well because we all honored the process.

These rules are not set in stone, it can be modified and other formats may work better.  However, having been involved in several chats w/ many people, this process has worked best.

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Virtual Participation Resources

Online Doc Suggested protocol for online chat meetings

by Kim Leeder Reed on Thu, Jan 28, 2010 at 03:52 pm
Note: Patricia Smith, Executive Director of the Texas Library Association, shared the following with me (which she received from someone else) and I thought I would pass it on. -Kim Leeder

The following is how we conducted the online chats.

Note: Patricia Smith, Executive Director of the Texas Library Association, shared the following with me (which she received from someone else) and I thought I would pass it on. -Kim Leeder

The following is how we conducted the online chats.

  1. Prior to chat, the agenda, moderator and protocol for responding is established and delivered via email.
  2. Upon logging into most chat rooms, you can see who has logged in first and so on.  This is how the moderator knows who gets the first opportunity to respond.
  3. The moderator begins his discussion and allows the first person who logged in to respond first.
  4. The next in line can respond accordingly or type "still thinking, pass" (or something similar). It then goes to the next person for a response (round robin style).  The moderator can also give the next in line ten seconds to respond and if nothing comes through, then the next person can jump in.

It may appear that it would go slowly, but it doesn't.  You can see when your turn comes up next, and very often someone has already asked the same question or made a similar statement so there is no need to repeat yourself and moves the chat along.  When we "chatted" in our UNT classes, there would be twenty of us in an online chat and it flowed very well because we all honored the process.

These rules are not set in stone, it can be modified and other formats may work better.  However, having been involved in several chats w/ many people, this process has worked best.

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ALCTS

Discussion ALCTS Midwinter Forum: Mix and Match: Mashups of Bibliographic Data

by David Miller on Thu, Jan 7, 2010 at 09:11 am

Monday, January 18, 10:30 a.m - 12:00 p.m., in the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center, room 104A/B.

Monday, January 18, 10:30 a.m - 12:00 p.m., in the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center, room 104A/B.

This ALCTS Midwinter Forum on sharing and re-use of metadata will highlight the many ways in which metadata is now created and circulated among multiple types of participants in the resource chain. Not only are library databases making use of ONIX-derived metadata, but library-sourced metadata is also moving back out into the larger discovery environment represented by entities such as Google and Amazon. Panel speakers will describe the state of the art of metadata matchups from their points of view, describe the challenges and obstacles to greater sharing, and outline desirable next steps.

The panel will include Renee Register (Global Product Manager, OCLC Cataloging and Metadata Services), Karen Coyle (Open Library), and Kurt Groetsch (Google).

Renee Register:

Beginning with a "Next Generation Cataloging" project started in 2007 and leading into "Metadata Services for Publishers" launched in 2009, OCLC has committed to development that encourages greater interoperability and mash-up of publisher supply chain and library metadata. The current program adds publisher metadata to WorldCat through crosswalks from ONIX to MARC. Publisher data either enriches existing WorldCat records through the addition of content descriptions, contributor information, etc. or is used to build a new record in WorldCat when a match does not exist. Mining of FRBR work sets during the process adds further enrichment to WorldCat and publisher data. Publisher data enriched with authority controlled authors, classification, subject headings, etc. is crosswalked back out to ONIX for use in the publisher supply chain creating more robust data for libraries and other end-users in the web discovery environment.

Karen Coyle:

The Open Library has as its goal the creation of one web page for every book ever published. It does not, however, intend to look like a standard library catalog. While some library data has been used to seed the database, other data comes from online bookselling sites, publishers, and individual members of the Web public. To bring in users, the OL is remaking bibliographic data into an interactive site with an emphasis on Works, not Manifestations, and on navigation not searching.

Kurt Groetsch will discuss topics including the challenges of metadata reuse, metadata matching, and the challenges of working with multivolume works.

We look forward to seeing you there!

For more information, please contact David Miller (Curry College) at dmiller curry edu.

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LLAMA BES Interior Design Awards Committee (Buildings and Equipment Section)

Discussion LLAMA BES Interior Design Award - Program survey questions

by Steven Carr on Wed, Jan 27, 2010 at 07:16 am

Program Description (Formal program proposal is available here on Connect)

This will be a panel discussion done in an interview format.  Our moderators, Deb Sunday and Elisabeth Martin, a librarian and an interior designer respectively, will ask the panelists questions that are on the survey and probe for additional insights that help reinforce and validate the connection between designer and librarian.

 

Here are the questions that were brainstormed at ALA Boston:

Proposed Questions:

 

What was the goal of your interior design project?

Program Description (Formal program proposal is available here on Connect)

This will be a panel discussion done in an interview format.  Our moderators, Deb Sunday and Elisabeth Martin, a librarian and an interior designer respectively, will ask the panelists questions that are on the survey and probe for additional insights that help reinforce and validate the connection between designer and librarian.

 

Here are the questions that were brainstormed at ALA Boston:

Proposed Questions:

 

What was the goal of your interior design project?

 What was your biggest surprise after the building was opened?

 What was your biggest disappointment?

 What’s your favorite feature?

 What’s your favorite finish?

 Have your users been surveyed about the project?  What do they respond to the most?

 What features do your staff love?  Hate?

 If a librarian, what’s your advice for working with a designer?

If a designer, what’s your advice for working with a librarian?

What didn’t you think would work that did?

What changes have you made since completion?

Did you have to spend money unexpectedly to complete the project or to maintain furnishings/finishes?

Was there any aspect to the design that hampered future flexibility of the space?

What do you know now that you wish you knew then?

Fill in the blanks:           Don’t ever ____________________

                                      Be sure to ____________________

 

PLEASE ADD YOUR COMMENTS TO ADD, EDIT, OR DELETE QUESTIONS FROM THE LIST.

THE DEADLINE FOR COMMENTS WILL BE FEBRUARY 5 at 5 p.m. EST.  The Program Committee will distribute the questions in the form of a survey to all award winners and compile the results.  They will also send the questions to the Presenters to help them prepare for the interview panel at the program. 

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ALA/SAA/AAM Joint Committee

Online Doc TCE articles from ILPB

by William Bill Sleeman on Thu, Jan 28, 2010 at 12:57 pm

 

TCE Articles from Index to Legal Periodicals (searched 1/28/2010) – 

Ammar, J. (2009). [Intellectual Property and Traditional Cultural Expressions in a Digital Environment]. European Intellectual Property Review, 31(10), 534. Retrieved January 28, 2010, from Legal Periodicals Full Text database.

 

TCE Articles from Index to Legal Periodicals (searched 1/28/2010) – 

Ammar, J. (2009). [Intellectual Property and Traditional Cultural Expressions in a Digital Environment]. European Intellectual Property Review, 31(10), 534. Retrieved January 28, 2010, from Legal Periodicals Full Text database.

Ruesch, M. (2008). Creating Culture: Protection of Traditional Cultural Expressions and Folklore and the Impact on Creation and Innovation in the Marketplace of Ideas. Syracuse Journal of International Law and Commerce, 35(2), 369-98. Retrieved January 28, 2010, from Legal Periodicals Full Text database.

Torsen, M. (2008). Intellectual Property and Traditional Cultural Expressions: A Synopsis of Current Issues. Intercultural Human Rights Law Review, 3, 199-214. Retrieved January 28, 2010, from Legal Periodicals Full Text database.

Torsen, M. (2006). "Anonymous, Untitled, Mixed Media": Mixing Intellectual Property Law with Other Legal Philosophies to Protect Traditional Cultural Expressions. The American Journal of Comparative Law, 54(1), 173-98. Retrieved January 28, 2010, from Legal Periodicals Full Text database.

RaoRane, M. (2006). Aiming Straight: The Use of Indigenous Customary Law to Protect Traditional Cultural Expressions. Pacific Rim Law & Policy Journal, 15(3), 827-56. Retrieved January 28, 2010, from Legal Periodicals Full Text database.

Torsen, M. (2005). "Anonymous, Untitled, Mixed Media": Mixing Intellectual Property Law with Other Legal Philosophies To Protect Traditional Cultural Expressions. Journal of the Copyright Society of the U.S.A., 53(1/2), 287-312. Retrieved January 28, 2010, from Legal Periodicals Full Text database.

Slattery, E. (2006). Preserving the United States' Intangible Cultural Heritage: An Evaluation of the 2003 UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage as a Means to Overcome the Problems Posed by Intellectual Property Law. DePaul-LCA Journal of Art and Entertainment Law, 16(2), 201-60. Retrieved January 28, 2010, from Legal Periodicals Full Text database.

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NBCT School Librarians

Discussion President highlights the importance of education to economic recovery

by Jennifer Terry (staff) on Thu, Jan 28, 2010 at 12:04 pm

As President Obama stated in his first State of the Union address last night, “In the 21st century, one of the best anti-poverty programs is a world-class education.”

The ALA believes that a world-class education includes instruction from a state-certified school librarian, teachers who know the school’s curriculum and effective techniques necessary to cross disciplines and integrate information and technology literacy.

Read more on the ALA Washington Office blog, the District Dispatch. http://bit.ly/drQWbs

ALA Spectrum Advisory Committee

Online Doc Agenda - Spectrum Advisory Committee - 2008 Annual Business Meeting

by Rubina Isaac (staff) on Thu, Jan 28, 2010 at 11:36 am

AGENDA
Spectrum Advisory Committee Business Meeting
ALA 2008 Annual Conference Anaheim
Friday, 6/27/2008 – 3:30 – 5:30 p.m.
Hilton Anaheim - Conference Room 6
Norman Maas, Chair Presiding

I. Introductions
II. Approve minutes from Midwinter meeting in Philadelphia

TASK FORCE REPORTS & PLANNING
III. Task Forces report out briefly on progress in their areas, and group discussion on items as needed.

AGENDA
Spectrum Advisory Committee Business Meeting
ALA 2008 Annual Conference Anaheim
Friday, 6/27/2008 – 3:30 – 5:30 p.m.
Hilton Anaheim - Conference Room 6
Norman Maas, Chair Presiding

I. Introductions
II. Approve minutes from Midwinter meeting in Philadelphia

TASK FORCE REPORTS & PLANNING
III. Task Forces report out briefly on progress in their areas, and group discussion on items as needed.

  • Fund-raising Task Force
    Financial Report Review (from Keith Brown in ALA Accounting), Annual Report (next steps for summer), news regarding endowment spending inquiries?
  • Recruitment Task Force
    LIS School Survey, Spectrum Outreach event in Anaheim
  • Professional Development Task Force
    Working with Divisions, Spectrum Scholars on Committees
  • Community Task Force
    Review of SSIG Business Plan, communications vehicle guidelineS
  • Vision & Sustainability Task Force
    Welcome to new Chair and incoming members, Business Plan developmentS

IV. Task forces will discuss the original deliverables and priorities assigned to their group to narrow and redefine scope as needed to realize key 2008 objectives. Please prepare a brief series of objectives, actions under each, priority level for the next six months, and accountabilities (who will do what by when to mark an objective as complete) to share with the Office for Diversity no later than July 1. This will be used to draft a business plan for the Advisory Committee as a whole with each Task Force outlining objectives under their single goal statement.

SAC SUBCOMMITTEE REPORTS

V. UPDATE – Alanna Aiko Moore, Spectrum Scholar Interest Group
VI. UPDATE – Rachel Garza Carreon, Spectrum Institute Planning and Highlights

OFFICE FOR DIVERSITY REPORT

VII. UPDATE – Spectrum News from the Office for Diversity (GEP) – Spectrum PhD Grant and Program in Anaheim; Spectrum Jury updates and overview of 2008 applications/recipients; Highlights of the Reach21 IMLS Grant objectives and intersections with SAC working groups
VIII. UPDATE – Office for Diversity staffing (GEP)
IX. DISCUSSION – Spectrum Feasibility and Pre-Campaign Study (GEP)

UPDATES FROM COMMITTEE ON DIVERSITY

X. UPDATE – COD activities - COD Chair, Valerie Bell
XI. Items to be sent to the Committee on Diversity in SAC Report?

ADDITIONAL ITEMS

XII. Guests: ???
XIII. Adjourn

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