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ALA Committee on Literacy

Discussion A little history of literacy and the census

by Aimee Quinn (non-member) on Sat, Jun 13, 2009 at 05:46 pm

I am reading a fascinating book entitled "The Industrial Book, 1840-1880" which is the third volume in the History of the Book in America series.  In this book is a great little chapter about the role of government in printing which discusses the evolution of how the government came to enumerate literacy in the nation.  I strongly recommend reading this chapter for everyone interested in the challenges of how we count literates in the United States. 

I am reading a fascinating book entitled "The Industrial Book, 1840-1880" which is the third volume in the History of the Book in America series.  In this book is a great little chapter about the role of government in printing which discusses the evolution of how the government came to enumerate literacy in the nation.  I strongly recommend reading this chapter for everyone interested in the challenges of how we count literates in the United States. 

The ISBN for this book is 978-0-8078-3085-7.  I read volume 1 in this series which is also very interesting.  Volume 2 has yet to be published.  Volume 4 was published last year and the final volume is set to be published later this year.

 Happy reading to all you bibliophiles!

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Universal Accessibility Interest Group (ACRL)

Discussion Welcome!

by Adina Mulliken on Mon, Jun 15, 2009 at 02:31 pm

Welcome to the Universal Access Interest Group!  Feel free to post here.

IFRT (Intellectual Freedom Round Table)

Online Doc IFRT Report

by Jen Hammond (staff) on Mon, Jun 15, 2009 at 01:47 pm
ACRL Division-level Committee Leaders

Discussion Resources for developing committee meeting agendas

by Katharine Coombes (staff) on Mon, Jun 15, 2009 at 12:21 pm

ACRL Committee Chairs and Vice-Chairs are responsbile for developing agendas for committee meetings held at Annual Conference. Agendas should be sent to committee memebers as well as Board and staff liaisons in advance of the meeting.

ACRL Committee Chairs and Vice-Chairs are responsbile for developing agendas for committee meetings held at Annual Conference. Agendas should be sent to committee memebers as well as Board and staff liaisons in advance of the meeting.

Whether you are a new vice-chair or an experienced leader, ACRL's resources for planning effective meetings are sure to add value to your committee meeting agenda. These resources can be found at http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/resources/makingthemeeting/makingthemeeting.cfm.

 Please be sure to include time in your committee meeting to discuss ACRL's 2009-2013 Priorities, the Annual SMART goals process, and more updates from the Leader Development and Strategic Planning Session on Friday.

An overivew of the responsibilities and duties of Committee Chairs and Vice-Chairs is available at http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/resources/tipsheets/tipsheet20chair.cfm

Please contact your Board or staff committee liaison with any questions you may have. 

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SRRT (Social Responsibilities Round Table)

Discussion Ann Sparanese on the Censorship of _Triple Cross _

by Kathleen McCook on Mon, Jun 15, 2009 at 09:39 am

Ann Sparanese has sent the following message to the SRRT and PLG discussion lists:

Mon, 15 Jun 2009
Colleagues,

A week or so ago, I brought to your attention an issue concerning Triple Cross by Peter Lance, and alerted you to the efforts by arguably the most powerful U.S. Attorney in the country, Patrick Fitzgerald, to censor it.  Since there there has been a little more press on it, I am hoping you would glance at the following links.

Ann Sparanese has sent the following message to the SRRT and PLG discussion lists:

Mon, 15 Jun 2009
Colleagues,

A week or so ago, I brought to your attention an issue concerning Triple Cross by Peter Lance, and alerted you to the efforts by arguably the most powerful U.S. Attorney in the country, Patrick Fitzgerald, to censor it.  Since there there has been a little more press on it, I am hoping you would glance at the following links.

In 2001, librarians were “all over” HarperCollins because the
publisher intended to pulp Michael Moore’s book Stupid White Men.  Moore credits librarians — actually they were librarians from these two lists! [SRRT List and PLG Discussion List ] — with saving his book.

This time, with Lance’s book, HarperCollins is so
far standing firm against the demands of the U.S. Attorney who — even though he is doing this as a “private” person — obviously brings the weight of his high office to bear. Is this not even more chilling than a publisher censoring itself? Can’t we now give HarperCollins some support, as librarians, for standing up to pressure from someone in government to kill a book?

Maybe some of you have doubts about the contents of Lance’s book. I haven’t read every page, or have thought about every argument he makes. None of us can independently confirm the correctness of his conclusions, or whether his interpretation of the facts is the only one.  Clearly there are some conclusions that do not please Mr. Fitzgerald. But this is beside the point. The point is that not only is Lance a reputable journalist, but HarperCollins is a large mainstream publisher with no interest,presumably, in publishing libel, defamation and baseless conspiracy theories. The publisher was sufficiently shook up by Fitzgerald’s concerns to take a very long, second look at the book, and to change a few things, but to fundamentally come to the same conclusion: there is no reason to
withdraw the book. It is scheduled to come out tomorrow.

Links follow.

Thanks for reading this,

Ann Sparanese
***
Newsweek:

New York Magazine
/

Associated Press

Chicago Sun Times

Library Juice Press Blog
[see especially comments including those by Cynthia Kouril, Peter Lance].

[for more on the role of "Libraries and Information Workers in Conflict
Situations" including A.S. see Information for Social Change Number 25.Summer 2007.]

 

See LIBRARIAN for more links.

 

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Gaming in Libraries Course

Discussion Beyond libraries

by David Miller. Purple Pawn (non-member) on Sun, Jun 14, 2009 at 07:38 pm

As a hobbyist and semi-professional, I found this lesson particularly interesting. I've been reading and thinking more about game design recently. This approach, with its focus on the game playing experience, however, was new to me. I will be recommending it to game designers. And I look forward to the book.

AASL International Relations Community

Discussion International Collaborative Lesson Plans

by Judi Repman on Sun, Jun 14, 2009 at 04:25 pm

This great wiki has some terrific examples of collaborative lessons with an international focus. The lessons include Our Nation, Cyber Classroom, Small World, Kiwis for Kenya, Islands Around the World, and Little Language Experts.

AASL International Relations Community

Discussion Worlds of Words

by Judi Repman on Sun, Jun 14, 2009 at 04:20 pm

Worlds of Words is published electronically by the Collection of Education at the University of Arizona. The current issue focuses on reading across cultures.

 

This is a description of the site from the home page:

Worlds of Words is published electronically by the Collection of Education at the University of Arizona. The current issue focuses on reading across cultures.

 

This is a description of the site from the home page:

WOW!

Welcome to Worlds of Words. You will find many useful resources on this site for building bridges between cultures. These resources include multiple strategies for locating and evaluating culturally authentic international children’s and adolescent literature as well as ways of engaging students with these books in classrooms and libraries. Use the blue navigation bar at the top of the page to browse or search our growing database of books, to read one of our two on-line journals, or to learn more about our mission. We encourage you to take time to explore the many resources on this site and to return often as we expand to include more voices like yours.

 

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Union Library Workers

Discussion Wirtz Labor Library receives John Sessions Memorial Award

by Kathleen McCook on Sun, Jun 14, 2009 at 12:02 pm

 

 

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Wirtz Labor Library is the recipient of the 2009 John Sessions Memorial Award, an honor presented by the Reference and User Services Association (RUSA) and named for John Sessions, former American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) co-chair of the AFL-CIO/ALA Joint Committee on Library Service to Labor Groups.

 

This annual award recognizes a library or library system that has made a significant effort to work with the labor community and has consequently brought recognition of the history and contribution of the labor movement to the development of the United States. Wirtz Labor Library was selected for its efforts in supporting the history and contribution of the labor movement in the United States. In addition to maintaining unique and historically significant collections, including rare international material, the library particularly impressed the committee with its recent efforts to make its collection more accessible to a broader audience through digitization and to increase visibility of the library through the Wirtz Labor Library Lecture Series.

A statement issued by the library expressed gratitude and appreciation for the distinction: “The U.S. Department of Labor’s library, established in 1917, is one of the oldest Cabinet-level libraries.  As we plan for the library’s centennial, our recent efforts have been to strengthen and revitalize the library and its services – and to provide and promote the library’s resources to a wider universe of customers.  As we build upon our rich history, it is our great pleasure to accept the 2009 John Sessions Memorial Award.”

Richard V. French, director of the library’s Center for Program Planning and Review, will receive the winner’s plaque on behalf of the library at the RUSA Awards Ceremony and Reception, scheduled for 3:30-5:30 p.m., Monday, July 13, as a part of ALA’s Annual Conference events. The exact location of this event will be announced on the RUSA website and at the RUSA Blog in late spring.

 

See also Working Life.

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