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Aaron Dobbs's picture

Discussion Startup emails

I asked on Twitter today, "Wonder if ALA should/can have more attendee-proposed and vetted events, a la DrupalCamp: http://drupal.org/node/519100"

Some people responded favorably, including several of you.  And this is the direction I'd like to see ALA heading in, so #makeithappen and all that.

I'm willing to put some work into this, but I can't do it all myself, which is where the rest of you come in :)

Things I'm willing to do: set up the tech infrastructure allowing people to propose/discuss/vote on sessions; rally the troops; cheerlead.
Things I'm not willing to do: figure out the ALA bureaucratic magic required; logistical planning for events beyond some correspondence with attendees; anything before October.

And I know there's some kind of grassroots program structure, but I don't know how it works or whether it already does what I'm thinking of here.  Maybe one of you does.  Because that should be checked first -- maybe we just need to publicize it!

Anyway.  Who's in?

-Andromeda

Aaron Dobbs's picture

The BIGWIG Showcases did this in previous years:
http://www.yourbigwig.com/showcase
The key is to have a sponsoring unit (LITA comes to mind *grin*) who will approve a program proposal (LITA PPC does this, and approved the BIGWIG Showcase several years running) and provide some logistical support (LITA PPC and BIGWIG were the logistics people for the Showcase)

I'd love to see this hit the BigALA level.
Jim Rettig's 2009 Grassroots Program Proposal effort was a good start:
http://jimrettig.org/blog/2008/11/29/call-for-grassroots-program-proposals-for-ala-annual-2009/

We should brainstorm some more, where's the best place for brainstorming and additional participants?
(twitter: too fragmented, Friendfeed: not everyone is there, Facebook: ditto Friendfeed comment)

I suggest ALA Connect (of course I do!): specifically, the Library Camp ALA community
http://connect.ala.org/node/150742

-Aaron

-Aaron
:-)'

"Always remember everyone is working to make the organization better in their own way."
-Eli Mina, ALA Parliamentarian

Aaron Dobbs's picture

Hi everyone,

I like the idea of a Marketing Camp - because if there is one weakness in Library Land, it's that we can't market ourselves to save our lives.  There are libraries doing great things (see the attached that I received from National Chung Hsing University at their Annual poster session) but it's few and far between.  More libraries should be doing what you see in that photo.

I'm also on board with Career Camp, focusing on alternative careers for LIS professionals.

-Kate

 

-Aaron
:-)'

"Always remember everyone is working to make the organization better in their own way."
-Eli Mina, ALA Parliamentarian

Aaron Dobbs's picture

For the past 3 years, to varying success, there has been an unconference at ALA. They have not been topic oriented, as a Drupal camp, Marketing Camp, or Career Camp, would be.

As Aaron said, popular vote was how BIGWIG got topics for the showcase. I am sure LITA PPC would be willing, provided we had a sponsor, to approve something.

I am with Aaron though, that something at the ALA Level would be nice. In that case, I would suggest bringing in Jenny Levine (for ALA tech logistics) and Mary Ghakis (for ALA bureaucracy support). Of course, subversion and flying under the radar for awhile may not be a terrible idea. A discussion on ALA Connect would be a good place to measure interest.

I am willing to help virtually, but I can make no promise of in person support.

-Michelle

-Aaron
:-)'

"Always remember everyone is working to make the organization better in their own way."
-Eli Mina, ALA Parliamentarian

Aaron Dobbs's picture

Adding my $0.02 to the most recent message…
I threw out the idea recently on Twitter of doing a cataloging unconference (or, if you prefer, CatCamp) in conjunction with Annual 12. The idea was met with enthusiasm. So, the cataloging community has your back at least.

I’m happy to help out, either virtually or on-site. I am clout-less, but good with details and the herding of cats.

Thanks,

Erin

-Aaron
:-)'

"Always remember everyone is working to make the organization better in their own way."
-Eli Mina, ALA Parliamentarian

Andromeda Yelton's picture

In terms of theming, I think it would be best for us not to pick, but to crowdsource -- by all means come up with some ideas to get discussion going but also solicit more, and go with where the energy is.  The Young Turks used an interesting voting scheme at uservoices.com, so maybe something like that, but incorporated into the same site we'll be using to crowdsource program proposals, in order to build community/awareness?

LITA Board of Directors, 2013-2019; President-Elect, 2017-2018
http://andromedayelton.com
@ThatAndromeda

Jenny Levine (staff)'s picture

Of course I'm going to make a pitch for keeping this kind of thing in Connect, where users can take advantage of an existing login and notifications system. We're already planning to add uservoice-like functionality and ratings for content (stars, thumbs-up kinds of stuff) for "voting" in the ALA Members community. If we can outline what we want, I can figure out how to get it in the timeline. I'm sure there are other Connect groups that could use this type of functionality, too.

Also, I should note that ALA is moving in the direction of implementing a single program proposal system for Annual that would allow for submission, review, and approval of sessions, so we might not have to start from scratch if this ends up with an ALA unit.

Jenny

Andrea Mullarkey (non-member)'s picture

I have been talking about this issue with folks around ALA and here at my library so count me in. It's hard for me to see just yet where I can plug in, but I trust opportunities will arise.

Andromeda Yelton's picture

I know you and your detail orientation and your arts & crafts abilities.  I know opportunities will arise :).

LITA Board of Directors, 2013-2019; President-Elect, 2017-2018
http://andromedayelton.com
@ThatAndromeda

Jenny Levine (staff)'s picture

Jim Rettig's Grassroots program lives on, and we could definitely use help marketing it more. We were off a little in timing this past year but in general, the online form opens in December-ish, anyone can submit any program through February, selections are made in March, and the dozen programs are held at Annual.

We've had one unconference that I'd consider popular. The rest have had 30-50 participants, so I'm not sure why that option hasn't been more popular. My assumption is that there's just too much to compete with at Annual.

Same thing with the Uncommons area, which is designed to give attendees a space for a rolling unconference, but which finally saw some real programming for the first time during this past Annual.

I guess my concern is attaching a Camp to Annual - what would be different that would help it succeed where these other efforts haven't? Midwinter might be better, but programming is increasing there, too, despite the "business meeting" label as discussion groups do more and more things that quack like presentations.

Whatever you want to try, though, I'm in.

Aaron Dobbs's picture

The Challenges I see are:

  • The Compressed Schedule (Sat-Mon are the heavy programming days)
  • Friday PreConferences cost extra (have to charge for attendance to cover room & food)
  • So many great program descriptions (1000+ programs? Is that right? Whoa)

What are some of the opportunities?

  • Heavy Promotion of Crowdsourced Programming (see what's "hot" leading up to conference)
  • New Conference Scheduler (see what programs are getting lots of attention, in toto as well as by friends)
  • Interest in shorter, more focused programs (15-20 minutes focused on a topic, instead of an hour of babble)

Models?

  • ACRL Conference: Cyber Zed Shed (the name means nothing to me, but the idea - a rolling 15 minute lightning talk - works well (esp. if in a corner of the Exhibits or in a prominent hallway, but not so well in a dedicated room for some reason)
  • LITA Froum: Lightning Talks (LITA Forum is smaller, but same idea as ACRL CZS above)
  • ALA Annual: Uncommons (I think this worked well, but was kind of hard to squeeze into my schedule because I never knew what was going to be discussed and when... omg, am I asking for more structure?! Gah!)

Also, the Conference Schedule needs some more flexibility, time-slot-wise, and the planning process really needs to be shortened as much as possible. This will, of course, need a balance of concerns:

  • time needed for approving programs/content
  • while still leaving time for people to mark their interests in the Confernece Scheduler
  • while still leaving time for using the attendance prognostications to assign rooms
  • so we don't get whacked like we did with room assignments in NOLA, for example :)

-Aaron
:-)'

"Always remember everyone is working to make the organization better in their own way."
-Eli Mina, ALA Parliamentarian

Andromeda Yelton's picture

Can you (O person with the statistics) tell me what counts as "popular"?  I guess from what you're saying that 30-50 is not popular?

 

*hm* I see your point about camp and unconference maybe being too similar in format and audience.  Maybe the camp format would be a way to reinvigorate an unconference?  Or maybe it's possible to run both, especially if at different time slots (but if Camp weren't friday, when *would* it be?)

LITA Board of Directors, 2013-2019; President-Elect, 2017-2018
http://andromedayelton.com
@ThatAndromeda

Jenny Levine (staff)'s picture

With my practical hat on, "popular" means being able to justify spending money on the A/V equipment, which can be ridiculously high. If we're talking about 15-20 people, then they could meet anytime in the Uncommons, where we're already paying for a projector. I'm trying to decide if we want two un-spaces on Friday when there's less traffic to begin with.

Putting on my non-practical hat, I would want an un-event to have enough people to generate a vigorous discussion with a variety of ideas. The year there were 100 participants, I felt like there were more small group topics and it was easy to hop between multiple discussions that I found the most interesting. When there are fewer people and fewer groups, there seem to be fewer topics, which could be considered good or bad, depending on your viewpoint.

I'd be curious to hear how others define "popular" in this context. I also want to point out that I differentiate between "popular" and "successful." Erin Dorney and Young Lee ran a great event this year with no advance notice, which I consider to be wildly successful. If anything, I would probably just not run the Uncommons on Fridays rather than give up the Unconference.

Jenny

 

Erin Leach's picture

This year I attended an awesome grassroots program on cataloging zine collections. Despite it being held from 4-5:30 on Monday afternoon, the room was packed. Most people didn't have anything else that conflicted w/that time slot, since most programming had already happened by that point.

Despite the time potentially being fraught with woe, maybe Monday afternoon would work?

--Erin

Kate Kosturski's picture

I also like the idea for a Monday or Tuesday afternoon program.  I had a BIG block of time between my last scheduled thing (working the JSTOR booth) and Battledecks.  The T is for Training podcast had their live show around this time and they had a great turnout, probably for the same reason.

Kate

-- 

Kate Kosturski

http://www.katekosturski.info

Mary Ghikas's picture

Generally speaking, I think late Monday and Tuesday -- particularly Tuesday morning -- can work well.  I've been really impressed by the crowds for Battledecks, at 5:30pm on Monday.  mg

Andromeda Yelton's picture

Oh, and can you tell me more about the Grassroots thing?  I saw some programs in the scheduler tagged with grassroots, which got my attention, but clicking on that tag & searching the site didn't tell me what it *meant* (maybe something to fix? ;) so I couldn't determine if I cared.  I've talked about it a tiny bit with Jim Rettig and read his 2008 (2009?) blog post about it but I still don't really *get* how it works.

 

(The answer, of course, is that it would succeed because people would be so excited about having proposed programs themselves, & having been involved in their evolution in the months leading up to conference, and because we're such damn charismatic social media mavens.  or something like that. ;)

LITA Board of Directors, 2013-2019; President-Elect, 2017-2018
http://andromedayelton.com
@ThatAndromeda

Jenny Levine (staff)'s picture

Until Jim's Grassroots program, there was no way for an ALA member to submit a program proposal for Annual without it going through an ALA unit for approval first. It's still kind of amazing to me that this didn't already exist, but Jim recognized that there are members who want to submit a program outside of the existing division proposal processes (which take 18 months to work through), so he spent time, money, and effort on creating a new process for ALA itself.

So now, any member can fill out the Grassroots form to submit a program that ALA itself will sponsor (translation: give it space in the convention center and pay for the projector and microphone). In the past, the programs chosen from the pool were made by a team of Emerging Leaders, with no further bureaucracy needed. The programs didn't have to get further approval from a planning committee, board, or internal staff.

In addition, the fact that proposals can be submitted all the way up until March means more current topics can be added to the upcoming program, not the one that's still a year away.

I'm not sure we really need the name "grassroots" anymore, which is why I haven't spent a lot of time explaining it in the Scheduler. ALA isn'g going to slot programs into "tracks" anymore, so I was going to bring up the question of continuing the label in the title. To me, it's just a more current program submitted directly to ALA by one or more of its members, so what does "grassroots" really tell you? (Honestly, I'm asking what does it tell you? If it means something to you, I can be persuaded we need to keep it.)

Does that help explain the program and why it was so revolutionary when Jim pushed it?
Jenny 

Mary Ghikas's picture

Personally, I don't love the term "grassroots" programs.  Other conferences -- ones where I actually get to attend some sessions -- use terms like "contributed programs" or "contributed papers."  It is good to have a process for individuals to share stuff they're passionate about -- without necessarily having to go through a round table or division.  The division or round table may -- appropriately -- have a particular content focus in "filtering" programs.  ALA can be broader. 

I hope we'll always need a selection process -- because we'll have so many proposals.  Perhaps this year we can try the "crowdsourcing" concept for the first cut.  I also like the idea of using an EL jury.  That will provide a fresh perspective on the programming.

 

Aaron Dobbs's picture

Length of programs?

Doing both an Unconference and Camp(s)

  • Does an unconference need to be 8 hours long?
    (they've historically been scheduled 8-4, iirc?)
  • Would a themed Camp in the morning followed by an unrelated Unconference in the afternoon work?
    (or the reverse?)

 

-Aaron
:-)'

"Always remember everyone is working to make the organization better in their own way."
-Eli Mina, ALA Parliamentarian

Kate Kosturski's picture

Hm, I like the idea of reducing the hours of the unconference, and tacking on Library Camp (in whatever form we envision it) either before or after the unconference - preferably before, as people can take all the awesome things they learn at Library Camp and grow them at the unconference.

Kate

 

-- 

Kate Kosturski

http://www.katekosturski.info

Mary Ghikas's picture

hmmm -- might it be useful to "bracket" the conference with a half-day on each side (friday/late Monday or Friday/Tuesday morning)?  I was at an asssociation execs conference in the spring and a colleague of mine pulled together an informal end-of-conference session.  For me, it was very helpful to be able to think aloud and "process" with colleagues what I had heard that was interesting, what prompted a "must learn more about this..." response from me, what I was pushing back against, etc.  Even with a smaller conference (than ALA), not everyone had been to the same things, met the same people, etc.  I got as much -- or more -- from that end-of-conference reflection/discussion with interesting and provocative colleagues as I did from most of the formal sessions. 

 

Aaron Dobbs's picture

I think we should figure out a way to schedule this "bracketing" idea for an #alamw12 road test and an #ala12 implementation.

At the very least, we should block out time for these in the Conference Scheduler and see how many people are interested enough to mark then as "Planning to Attend" - we can crowdsource (ugh, now it sounds buzzwordy) the size of the room & recruit last-minute moderators?

I'd love to moderate something like this, but Monday afternoon is LITA Board and Tuesday morning is ALA Council III for me :|

-Aaron
:-)'

"Always remember everyone is working to make the organization better in their own way."
-Eli Mina, ALA Parliamentarian

Andrea Mullarkey (non-member)'s picture

I really like Mary's idea of bracketing the conference.

I think Friday could be a good day for a camp of some sort. Most of Friday's programming is structured in these larger blocks of time with a more specific focus already. And for folks who are not particularly wild about the crowd-sourced topic (no matter how good a job we do, there will be some) can open up their day to to attend something else. 

But most exciting for me is the idea of having some time at the end of the conference to come together with others to process the hottest topics. Since it's hard to predict what those hottest topic would be 18 months out, something like we're building would be an ideal way to provide that forum. Monday afternoon (before the wildly popular battle decks) would be my first choice. By Tuesday morning I know a lot of folks are trying to squeeze in a last bit of touristing, or are already thinking about getting home.

Andrea

Mary Ghikas's picture

So -- if we block in a time/space for a reflection gathering -- is someone, or several someone(s) committee to working on this?  What would your vision of this be?

Aaron Dobbs's picture

Hiya,

I can help with prep stuff, but we would need to also identify people on the ground (logistics, moderation, introduction, notetaking, etc.) - as mentioned above, I've got existing constraints on my availability (some of which are in flux).

Mary, could you tell me what beureaucratic hoops I/we need to jump through to get this officially rolling - or at least as a pilot? (if the conference deadlines haven't already passed)

I'm thinking we'd need a podium, mic, projector, screen, 5-10 eight-person (round) tables... oh, and a room :)

I think a "post-conference session" makes sense, either Monday early-afternoon or Tuesday morning?

When do people usually leave?
I assume Monday afternoon departures, but there was a respectable turnout for Mionday evening activities in NOLA.
I wonder if Experian can get (or has provided) us some lodging data?

Thanks!

-Aaron
:-)'

"Always remember everyone is working to make the organization better in their own way."
-Eli Mina, ALA Parliamentarian

Aaron Dobbs's picture

Actually, this sounds like a job for... the Networing Uncommons!
There, location logistics managed :)

-Aaron
:-)'

"Always remember everyone is working to make the organization better in their own way."
-Eli Mina, ALA Parliamentarian

Mary Ghikas's picture

Not too much on bureaucratic hoops here -- though I realize some of you may think otherwise!  We can make this happen -- though it would be extremely helpful to know what you want to do and when in October rather than early January. 

Aaron -- I agree that this "works" with the Networking Uncommons idea.   I'm a fan of the "uncommons" -- but we've struggled somewhat to make it really work?  Perhaps we can bring it all together as a "rolling" Unconference -- F-M?   AV is where the $$ is -- to the tune of hundreds of thousands of dollars in a typical conference -- so keeping AV under control is always an issue for me.  But, yes -- we already have AV in the Uncommons. 

Not sure what "lodging data" you want.  For MW we typically "block" (commit to) about 4,000 rooms on "peak" night  -- and AC is about double that.  So, what I can tell you is that generally we have very close to "peak" on Friday.  We're increasingly more likely to add rooms on the pre-conference "shoulder" nights than on the post-conference "shoulders."

 

Aaron Dobbs's picture

Hi Mary, thanks...

Basically, I was wondring how many people tend to stay into Tuesday (since it is now the last day, instead of Wednesday) - how many rooms accrue to ALA attendees on Monday nights? If there are only a couple hundred, a monday afternoon/evening timeslot doesn't make much sense. If there are a few thousand overnighting through Tuesday, then Monday afternoon/evening works better.

As for "what we want to do" - I think we want a moderator to spend 3 minutes introducing the topic (what was great (or what did you learn) at ALA this time around); then have the tables do small groups to determine topics for 3-5 minutes; then have the tables assign themselves "main topics" and people can float to which ever main topic most interests them and the table participants can handle themselves for most or the rest of the time. Maybe a 10-20 minute wrap up where each table sums up what they've talked about and the tables' notetaker(s) are encouraged to post the notes to the ALA Library Camp (or other appropriate) Connect Community.

Is that reasonable for a Monday afternoon Wrapup Unconference / ALA Camp?
(this is just me brainstorming, the folks on the ground would have to make the session work)

-Aaron
:-)'

"Always remember everyone is working to make the organization better in their own way."
-Eli Mina, ALA Parliamentarian

Mary Ghikas's picture

So -- if we block in a time/space for a reflection gathering -- is someone, or several someone(s) committee to working on this?  What would your vision of this be?

 

JP Porcaro (non-member)'s picture

reflection gatherings need open social gaming

------ JP

LaVerne Poussaint's picture

My response to this newest provocation - along with relevant links to legal documents putting the whole matter into context  and my exposure of proposals of violence against me by the ALA gaming contingent - have been removed by the Website Advisory Committee - WHILE THIS MUZZLING GRAPHIC UPLOADED BY THE ORGINAL AGENT PROVOCATEUR HAS REMAINED.

My reply to the Library RunOff included a notation regarding my initial (Thursday 18 Aug 2011) response to Porcaro's fellatio uploads. Subsequent edits altered the timeline and a coherent reading of post/response chronologies.

The proper governmental entities had already been alerted; this latest provocation has also been forwarded. Any and all pertinent materials originally uploaded and excised can and will be subpoenaed, as is necessary, in this or related cases, for the purposes of any interested party.

Know that a select few of ALA's underwriters were contacted by me after ALA failed to remove the fellatio uploads. Know that the Website Advisory Committee did not deem it fit to remove that material until their finances were put in jeopardy. 

Know that they now monitor me, not the original transgressor - Porcaro.

Know that through the LOC archives can be obtained the Twitterati exchanges (via Danforth account) which called for my physical harm.

In the selfsame manner that Admin has now accessed my account to excise my posting, is the same mechanism through which the WebMaster could have deleted Porcaro's illegally uploaded materials in the first instance.

Jenica Rogers's picture

The difference you refuse to recognize is that while Porcaro's uploads may be undeniably childish and arguably offensive, your continued responses have devolved into ugly ad hominem attacks on Porcaro's character. As a result, you have effectively killed what was a productive discussion thread and turned it into your personal soapbox. It is your emotional and personal diatribes that are undermining ALA, not easily-ignored childishness from a self-styled agent provocateur.

I also cannot believe I'm violating my personal Do Not Feed The Trolls rule - I don't really love ALA, and I really find JP annoying - but your behavior - including your choice to make public an email that was sent to you privately out of concern for the impression you were making publicly - is obnoxious.

Kate Kosturski's picture

I agree with Jenica 100 percent. While I found JP's initial comments annoying and completely irrelevant to our discussion, you have surpassed him in annoying, obnoxious behavior. 

-- 

Kate Kosturski

http://www.katekosturski.info

JP Porcaro (non-member)'s picture

Come on, librarians:

ALA Dance Party was the premier social event at the past two ALA Conferences. It's a completely "different" form of social interaction for our profession, and it helped enable personal relationship building between attendees. 

My suggestion for open social gaming as a reflection gathering for this event is along those same lines: a completely "different" form of social interaction for our profession. I have run open gaming during national & state library conferences and they were smash successes in terms of both attendance and relationship-building.

I don't see how either of those suggestions were "idiotic", "annoying" OR "humor". I was serious about them based on past successes.

Can we stop this?  

 

------ JP

Jenica Rogers's picture

JP, when you use words, and explain yourself and your goals, instead of posting animated GIFs, you make a lot more sense, and seem far less childish. And less idiotic. Because what you just wrote sounds smart and useful, and I agree with you. Posting animated GIFs with no context, no explanation or justification of your ideas, and no contextual linkage to the discussion at hand? Not so helpful.

None of which justifies the rest of what's been communicated by Ms. Poussaint. Opinions about other people? We all have 'em, and should share 'em. But bullying is uncalled for.

Mary Ghikas's picture

JP -- What might this look like?  I spent some time at the gaming night (I know, you called it something different) in New Orleans and enjoyed it -- but assume you have something different in mind when you talk about using "gaming" in an end-of-conference reflection.  I'm not opposed -- just unclear.  "Games" or gaming principles have been used effectively in a variety of contexts by different professional groups.  In the sense that "gaming" is about choices and consequences, I think that in fact "games" could be an effective learning strategy for a number of key ALA issues.  So -- what do you have in mind here?  How might it work? 

JP Porcaro (non-member)'s picture

Open gaming EXACTLY like we did at the event you attended is perfect. People play, people talk...it's all about decompressing and/or growing new ideas. Gamifying probably wont make ALA's issues any more fun or solvable. 

 

------ JP

Patrick Sweeney (non-member)'s picture

I'm going to jump in for better or worse and without regard to the possible "subpoena" of my postings.  Maybe I understand JP's point a little clearer having heard him speak about his ideas, had many conversations with him about his beliefs, and had many personal and largely profound experiences that would support his claims in regard to his #partyhard and #makeithappen statements.  I would make the argument from all of this that his postings represent an artistic expression of his beliefs, ideas, and values and that we are to interpret them as we may and make whatever judgments we would so choose about the message he is attempting to express.  I believe artistic use may be protected under copyright law in this case?  But that isn't for me to comment on as I have no legal background.

In regard to the aforementioned "fellatio" video by DMX... I find this artist's expression of his experiences throughout his life no more offensive then, for example, Antonio Canova's marble carving The Three Graces (or, as favorited on some individual's Flickr page it is entitled "lesbos") and depicts what is described as lesbians erotically touching each other.  It would be hard to make the legal argument that one would be offended by one such artistic sexual representation, but favorite another.  Perhaps its the medium?  But, once again I have no legal background.  And... I suppose I have no artistic background either, so take my ramblings as one would be inclined.

I would also like to make the case that I believe JP chooses very carefully to not include a large amount of context to his postings in order to preserve the artistic integrity of his beliefs.  Maybe he feels his time wouldn't be well spent by explaining his art to us.  I have the understanding that we are to find our own meanings for his pieces and that there is a burden of understanding on our part rather than a burden of proof on his.    He may be the Andy Warhol of Librarianship and we may simply lack the lens through which to gain a perspective on his interpretation of the world that surrounds him.  Perhaps the question we need to ask ourselves is this; do librarians imitate JP, or does JP imitate librarians.

Patrick Sweeney (non-member)'s picture

LaVerne Poussaint's picture

Jenica Rogers's picture

Wow, now you're equating Porcaro's idiotic humor, a professional discussion board for adults, and the ALA's policy on posting on same to child pornography lawsuits? Good luck with that.

JP Porcaro (non-member)'s picture

More Dance Parties!

[edit:](the DMX song is NSFW)

 [content removed]

------ JP

LaVerne Poussaint's picture

How is it OK with you, ALA, that an ERSTWHILE "EMERGING LEADER", NOMINATED & ELECTED BY YOU, can get away with posting this on our Organization's PUBLIC site?? Porcaro's downloads aren't even copyright-cleared.

Moreover, this, along with Porcaro's "Everybody Can be a Library Shaker & Mover" ALA Dance Party Group boinking post 

http://connect.ala.org/node/142988 

informs me that the Organization's unconsidered lurch from scholastic support to salesmanship in order to sustain the profession's place within society has VEERED ENTRIELY OFF TRACK. You have GONE TOO FAR, ALA & ALA GAMING, in what is deemed allowable to survive.

EMERGING PUBLIC LEADERSHIP IMPLIES, PRESUPPOSES EVEN, A PREREQUISITE: THE NECESSARY OCCURRENCE OF A PERSONAL, PRIVATE EVOLUTION. SUCH HAS NOT BEEN DEMONSTRATED HERE NOR EVIDENCED ELSEWHERE BY PORCARO .

...And what formerly functioned as an Interest Group - now being touted as a Roundtable - will get its fuzzies funded, as result of the pernicious persistence of such a "LEADER".

That dank ditch of which I warned the Gaming Contingent in 2009?? You are in it. It's called DEVOLUTION.

What an obnoxiously unprofessional embarrasment!!

Were it not for STS and LITA, I'd revoke my ALA membership, STATIM.

[That's right, I said it; and were his NSFW videos not posted publicly, I would not be compelled to respond publicly].

Jenny Levine (staff)'s picture

Hi, Everyone --

If you haven't had a chance to do so, please take a moment to read through the ALA Connect User Guidelines. It's important that everyone be aware of and follow them.

Thanks,
Jenny

LaVerne Poussaint's picture

So, are we to understand, Jenny, that the illegal audial and visual uploads of the ganga-smokin', purp-afflicted, weapons-totin', cocaine-snortin', grammatically-impaired, animal-assaulting, FBI-impersonating, balladeering car thief inviting us to suck his "d*ck" will not be deleted by you?

Make it plain, please, for those like me of the less-than-polite persuasion.

And please do further clarify for the misapprehending me: your refusal to remove the transgression and the transgressor - according to the Guidelines - is predicated upon the principles of non-censorship and freedom of member expression? And that if ALA were to be sued for copyright infringement by the artists, the Organization could and would forge a solid defense on behalf of itself and the offending member who posted the materials?

Am I properly comprehending this to be your and ALA's bottom line?

These aren't rhetorical questions posed by me, Jennifer.

Make it plain. Make your position unambiguously known.

This member is enforcing her freedom of expression by demanding that you take DOWN Porcaro's uploads NOW and REVOKE HIS ACCESS -AS PER ALA'S OWN GUIDELINES.

 

JP Porcaro (non-member)'s picture

sorry for party rocking.

------ JP

LaVerne Poussaint's picture

The moment for ALA to have reclaimed from a certain segment of its manifestly mal-mutated body politic the rightful place of honour, pride, and purer purpose has come and has gone - unseized.

This is the 4th day since my denouncement of Porcaro's uploads  - brought to the attention of all of ALA - from Exec Council level on down – via this site, direct e-mail transmissions, and later, Twitter (to the chagrin of many who believed that I could be wished away or ignored away or silenced away or gossiped away). 

Having been ushered through the valley of critical decision by various transpirations and led right up to the threshold of transposition where it could have reversed the downward trajectory of this body, ALA failed. Utterly.   

My question for you is not “Quo vadis, ALA?” but, rather, what command/control team steered you here in the first place, to this point where your hi-jacked and whored-out professional body is held hostage to the sullying demands and unsavory commercial coercions of a certain kind of creative criminality (aka “marketing”) such as those made in @8bitlibrary’s blogpost:

http://blog.8bitlibrary.com/2011/06/03/everyone-can-be-a-library-mover-shaker-or-you-arent-a-mover-shaker-unless/ ?

…And how much of our dues will be allocated to pay respect’s redeeming ransom?

…And what allotment will reclaim and protect this member body from forcibly serving as public host(ess) to strong-arming offenders such as those who would announce via their 17 August 2011 @8bitlibrary TweetDeck public proclamation:

                      ""@AndrewWK's new song: "I'm a goner". @8bitlibrary's new moto [sic] "I'm a boner."" ?

https://twitter.com/#!/8bitlibrary/status/103889993239494657

 How do you make your way back from here, ALA, from this sullied state of affairs towards that of a governance of right reasoning?

In a nanosecond, with one keystroke, ALA, could have deleted from this ALAConnect site Porcaro’s uploaded incantations to c*cksuckery à la DMX.

But, it did not. It forfeited the return; at that one crucial moment of decision, it abjectly failed. And it was not due to economic downturns, demographic shifts, governmental regulations, or some such. Nothing outside of you, ALA, but rather inside of your hive mind, dwelling within the damaged collective psyche of this group, failed to take determined action, or, it determined to take non-action. Failed to "make it happen", and through your passivity is propagated such a condition of un-wellness, within the profession and without. Your shame redounds upon us all, and beyond us all.

In either case, and for whatever reasons, you have been grossly negligent and bereft of duty; in either case, you have failed to absolutely expurgate from participatory leadership those proven to be unworthy.

I, myself, function by fiat; so, maybe I’m not adequately understanding why it would actually take 4 days' time for deliberation, consultation, conference, and convention on this crucial matter.

So and therefore, for every single passing day that those videos remain in place and the offending member(s) are not dispossessed of standing nor dislodged from position[s], that same number of your sponsors, underwriters, and patrons – public and private, governmental and corporate - will be contacted regarding this issue, sans the cushioning of customary courtesies, à la LaVerne. Four (4) have already been alerted.

You need no longer issue communiqués on the lamentations of future death of libraries, ALA; your own apoptosis set in long ago.

Kate Kosturski's picture

Let's try and get this post back on topic.  This has turned from any sort of legitimate complaint into a clear ad hominem attack.  Any point you were trying to make has been lost in your spammer-like tactics, both here and on the LITA listserv.  It does no one any good. 

I suggest talking with JP directly from now on if you still have issues.  You can message him privately on ALA Connect, though I would rethink your communication tactics before sending. 

Best, 

Kate 

 

-- 

Kate Kosturski

http://www.katekosturski.info

LaVerne Poussaint's picture

Lack of "civility" is what generated the postings in the first place. 

My point has not been lost as the content has now been removed. Ça y est!

I'll have no need or desire to ever engage again with this group.

Done deal.