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ALCTS CaMMS (Cataloging and Metadata Management Section) Section

In: ALCTS CaMMS (Cataloging and Metadata Management Section), Association for Library Collections and Technical Services (ALCTS) -- Sections, Cataloging

Dear ALCTS Members,

We need you to volunteer for ALCTS: the Division and our Sections!

The appointment process has begun.  I will be working with each Section’s appointing officer to make committee assignments this spring.  Take some time now to explore the website, especially the “Member Groups & Communities” area. 

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Online Doc ALCTS Program at ALA Annual 2017: Creating the Future of Digital Scholarship Together

by Susan Wynne on Tue, May 30, 2017 at 12:44 pm

CaMMS is co-sponsoring the program "Creating the Future of Digital Scholarship Together: Collaboration from Within Your Library" 

 

Saturday, June 24, 2017

8:30-10 AM

McCormick Place, W185a

CaMMS is co-sponsoring the program "Creating the Future of Digital Scholarship Together: Collaboration from Within Your Library" 

 

Saturday, June 24, 2017

8:30-10 AM

McCormick Place, W185a

This program will feature a panel of librarians involved in the provision of digital scholarship services. Their presentations will highlight a range of opportunities for technical services' contribution to this emerging field of librarianship. The speakers will provide case studies that will stimulate ideas between digital scholarship librarians and individuals in areas such as collections and metadata services, and ways to collaborate in support of new forms of faculty and student scholarship. 

Presentation Abstracts 

Matt Carruthers, University of Michigan 
“Connecting the Dots: Using Digital Scholarship Methods to Facilitate New Modes of Discovery in Special Collections” 

A team from the University of Michigan Library, consisting of members from Technical Services, Special Collections, and the Research division, has been exploring a framework for fostering new and original research in Special Collections by incorporating digital scholarship methods. We utilize existing metadata from Special Collections finding aids, along with openly available digital scholarship tools, to identify and visualize hidden connections and social networks among creators of our archival collections. This new information can serve as a novel and innovative resource to help guide further research with Special Collections materials. We have developed a proof of concept for a service model through which customized visualizations can be created for researchers according to their individual research questions. This presentation will discuss the methodology and tools we are using, as well as our goals for piloting the service. 

Laurie Allen, University of Pennsylvania 
“New Kinds of Collections: New Kinds of Collaborations” 

Beginning in late November of 2016, faculty, grad students, and librarians at University of Pennsylvania began building collaboration to create a safer infrastructure for federal environmental and climate data. The collaboration grew to support 50 events with thousands of participants around the country, and engaged many dozens of libraries and librarians in imagining new kinds of collections in response to an urgent need. The collection we were trying to build, a copy of all federal data, is mammoth (and, of course, unrealistic) but brought forward new kinds of collaborations within the Penn Libraries, across the University, and with a huge range of national and international collaborators. The large group included catalogers, digital preservation specialists, library leaders, humanists, scientists and others. In this session, we’ll dig into the nitty gritty of collaboration across departmental and institutional boundaries in support of a giant project. What kinds of skills were needed? How were they marshalled? What kinds of collaborations worked best within a single institution, and when did cross-institutional work turn out to be easier? We’ll talk through how various professional specialties and communities approach collaboration, and what lessons can be drawn for building new kinds of collections in the future. 

Amy Hunsaker and Dana Miller, University of Nevada, Reno 
“Once Upon a Name in the West: Name Authority Work as a Collaborative Experiment” 

The UNR Libraries Digital Initiatives Team has been exploring ways to create interactive digital collections and exhibits that focus on unique Nevada holdings. Digital Initiatives has supported Nevada-centric scholarship efforts by hosting a variety of formats including scanned photographs, text, and sheet music, recorded sound, and video. To this end, Digital Initiatives has collaborated with the Metadata and Cataloging and Special Collections Departments to pilot name authority workflows for personal, corporate, and place names that appear in digital collections but not in the published collections that catalogers regularly handle. 
In January 2017, the Metadata and Cataloging Department and representatives from Digital Initiatives and Special Collections attended formal NACO (National Authority Cooperative) program training and UNR Libraries became the first NACO contributing library in the state. This presentation will focus on the values and workflows that allow our departments to collaborate for better name authority control of unique Nevada names in digital collections. Our efforts to embrace authority work in digital scholarship will lead to a better future for any linked data projects we might embark on in the future, as well as bring to light many more figures from Nevada history and culture. 

Program Objectives: 
At the end of this program, participants will... 
(1) understand the opportunities and challenges to such digital scholarship/technical services collaboration 
(2) have ideas on how to foster such collaboration 
(3) recognize the kinds of skills, soft and hard, that can facilitate partnering on innovative research projects 

Target Audience: 
This program is intended for digital scholarship librarians, metadata librarians, instruction librarians, instructional technologists, web development librarians, and library administrators. 

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Online Doc Slides from the CaMMS Forum, ALA Midwinter 2017

by Susan Wynne on Tue, Feb 7, 2017 at 11:28 am

Slides from the three presentations at the CaMMS Forum at ALA Midwinter 2017, "Working Within and Going Beyond: Approaches to Problematic Terminology or Gaps in Established Vocabularies" are attached below.

 

Event CaMMS Forum at ALA Midwinter 2017 in Atlanta

by Susan Wynne on Thu, Dec 8, 2016 at 01:03 pm

Please join us for the ALCTS Cataloging & Metadata Management Section (CaMMS) Forum at ALA Midwinter in Atlanta, Georgia.

 Working Within and Going Beyond: Approaches to Problematic Terminology or Gaps in Established Vocabularies

 The CaMMS Forum is scheduled for Sunday, January 22, from 1:00-2:30 in the Georgia World Congress Center, Room B207.

 Add the CaMMS Forum to your ALA schedule: http://bit.ly/2h7VmxJ

 Speakers:

Please join us for the ALCTS Cataloging & Metadata Management Section (CaMMS) Forum at ALA Midwinter in Atlanta, Georgia.

 Working Within and Going Beyond: Approaches to Problematic Terminology or Gaps in Established Vocabularies

 The CaMMS Forum is scheduled for Sunday, January 22, from 1:00-2:30 in the Georgia World Congress Center, Room B207.

 Add the CaMMS Forum to your ALA schedule: http://bit.ly/2h7VmxJ

 Speakers:

 Janis L. Young, Senior Cataloging Policy Specialist, Library of Congress Policy and Standards Division (PSD)

The Ethics of Maintaining LCSH

 Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) has been continually updated since 1914, when the first edition was published as Subject Headings Used in the Dictionary Catalogues of the Library of Congress. The process of revision has changed with technological advances, but the main purpose has remained consistent: to keep the terminology current, neutral and unbiased.

 Janis Young will briefly explain LC’s procedures for adding and revising headings, and explain how everyone can become involved in the process. She will then explore some of the ethical principles that come into play when maintaining LCSH, and show how those principles have influenced decisions on specific proposals.

 Janis L. Young is a senior cataloging policy specialist in the Library of Congress’ Policy and Standards Division (PSD).  She maintains LC subject headings and classification numbers and is the editor of both the Subject Headings Manual and the Classification and Shelflisting Manual.  She is the coordinator of LC’s projects to develop genre/form, medium of performance, and demographic group terms.  Ms. Young serves as LC’s liaison to several American Library Association committees, including the ALCTS/CaMMS/Subject Analysis Committee.

 Tina Gross, Catalog Librarian and Associate Professor, St. Cloud State University

Examining the Library of Congress Subject Heading "Illegal aliens"

 This presentation will report on the process and discussions of the CaMMS Subject Analysis Committee working group charged with investigating the Library of Congress Subject Heading "Illegal aliens," including thought-provoking dilemmas and difficult questions encountered. Given the peculiarity of intense focus on single subject heading and other highly unusual circumstances (such as attempted legal intervention by members of Congress), the presentation will consider which aspects of the saga of the subject heading "Illegal aliens" might be relevant in future efforts to address problems with LCSH.

 Tina Gross is the Catalog Librarian and an Associate Professor at St. Cloud State University (part of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities system). Prior to coming to SCSU in 2007, she worked as a Hispanic/Latin American Languages Cataloger at the University of Pittsburgh.  She recently served as chair of the CaMMS Subject Analysis Committee Working Group on the LCSH “Illegal aliens.”

 Heather Moulaison Sandy, Assistant Professor, iSchool, University of Missouri

Jenny Bossaller, Associate Professor, iSchool, University of Missouri

Problems with Subject Access to Indigenous Knowledge

Indigenous Knowledge (IK) represents a challenge for organization since the worldviews of indigenous people do not align with the worldviews represented in traditional knowledge organization systems (KOSs) used in libraries. This talk will contextualize the problem of providing cognitively just access to indigenous materials, will talk about relevant problems of KOSs in libraries, including ones designed for other non-mainstream groups, and will suggest ways going forward to improve reliable subject access to IK.

Dr. Heather Moulaison Sandy studies organization of information in the online environment; she teaches and does research in these areas, including cataloging, digital libraries, and metadata.

Dr. Jenny Bossaller’s teaching and research focus broadly encompasses constraints on information flow, including aspects of information policy, history, and related social and technological phenomena.

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Event SAC Working Group on LCGFT Literature Terms

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Mon, Jun 8, 2015 at 11:31 am

Meeting of the working group

Event SAC GFIS Working Group on LCGFT Literature Terms

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Fri, Jun 20, 2014 at 07:37 pm

Meeting of the subcommittee

Name revised from SAC Subcommittee on Genre/Form LCGFT Terms

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Event CaMMS Forum

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Fri, Jun 20, 2014 at 07:37 pm

Please join us to learn about developments on this exciting project!

Translating BIBFRAME, or, What is all this #$%!?: Making its potential mutually intelligible to catalogers and coders alike

Presentations include:

Storming the Semantic Web. How will libraries, archives, and other cultural-heritage organizations take the Semantic Web by storm? Dorothea Salo will lay out the landscape, demonstrate promising projects, and suggest ways to get involved.

Dorothea Salo, Faculty Associate, School of Library and Information Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Please join us to learn about developments on this exciting project!

Translating BIBFRAME, or, What is all this #$%!?: Making its potential mutually intelligible to catalogers and coders alike

Presentations include:

Storming the Semantic Web. How will libraries, archives, and other cultural-heritage organizations take the Semantic Web by storm? Dorothea Salo will lay out the landscape, demonstrate promising projects, and suggest ways to get involved.

Dorothea Salo, Faculty Associate, School of Library and Information Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Currently a Faculty Associate in the School of Library and Information Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Dorothea Salo teaches about library technology, digital curation, database design, organization of information, and the changing landscape of publishing. She also serves on UW-Madison's Research Data Services team. In 2009 Library Journal named her a Mover and Shaker for her open-access advocacy. She has written and presented internationally on linked data, data curation, scholarly communication, social media, and user-centered design. She holds an MA in Library and Information Studies and another in Spanish from UW-Madison.

LC's MARC to BIBFRAME Converter: Practical, Fast, and Fun! Linked Data for Libraries and working with the BIBFRAME converter. Philip Schreur will candidly discuss what they discovered about the converter and the model itself in their recent work.

Philip Schreur, Head, Metadata Department, Stanford University.
Currently the Head of the Stanford University Metadata Department, Philip Schreur has previously worked for the University of California (Berkeley and Davis campuses) and as the Knowledge System Developer for HighWire Press. He holds an MLIS from the University of California, Berkeley and a PhD in Medieval music theory from Stanford. He serves as the past-chair of the Program for Cooperative Cataloging and on the editorial board of Library Resources & Technical Services (LRTS). He is responsible for Stanford University Library’s linked-data efforts and has been focused on the use of linked data for authority control in the Digital Repository and the transition from MARC to BIBFRAME, both for descriptive metadata transformation and creation.
Toy Stories: The State of Semantics in a Semiotic World. Old paradigms versus totally new adventures. How might we come together, across disciplines, to use linked data in real world solutions? Nannette Naught will present a simple metaphor for cross discipline discussion and suggest potential points of convergence.

Nannette Naught, Vice President Strategy & Implementation, Information Management Team (IMT), Inc.

Currently lead analyst and knowledge system designer at IMT, Nannette Naught has worked on information, knowledge, content, and document management systems in the Niche Publishing, Manufacturing/Technical Documentation, Association, and Library marketplaces. Within the Library marketplace, she currently serves as CoChair of the CaMMS Continuing Education Committee, served as an active member of the RDA Conference Forums and Programs Task Force, and as ALA's technical lead for RDA Toolkit development beginning in late 2006. She continues to learn about, advocate for, and develop applications for multi-version, multi-lingual, multi-encoding Library as Publisher solutions.

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Event CaMMS Forum

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Mon, Jan 13, 2014 at 07:22 pm

CaMMS Forum on the Bibliographic Framework Initiative (BIBFRAME)

Speakers:

Sally McCallum
Chief of the Network Development and MARC Standards Office, Library of Congress

Title of talk: MARC tags to BIBFAME Vocabulary: a new view of metadata

CaMMS Forum on the Bibliographic Framework Initiative (BIBFRAME)

Speakers:

Sally McCallum
Chief of the Network Development and MARC Standards Office, Library of Congress

Title of talk: MARC tags to BIBFAME Vocabulary: a new view of metadata

Abstract: McCallum will discuss the BIBFRAME Vocabulary and the model and direction it is going, with reference to the MARC model and familiar MARC tagging, illustrating that while the fundamental purpose is the same (describing resources for retrieval by end users) the BIBFRAME model will pull bibliographic data toward the web.

Michael Colby
Head of Original Cataloging and Music Bibliographer, University of California, Davis

Abstract: The University of California, Davis Libraries have received grant funding from the IMLS for the project: Reinventing Cataloging: Models for the Future of Library Operations. The proposed project defines a research agenda and set of activities to advance our community’s understanding of the resource description landscape and will begin to develop a roadmap that the library community can reference for planning investments and changes over the coming years. The project plans to collect data samples in several different encoding standards (MARC, DC, MODS, etc.), map and convert them into the BIBFRAME model and make them available in a next-generation discovery tool for reaction of the library community. The project will also look at the technical services workflows related to the feasibility and success of adopting the BIBFRAME model in research libraries. This presentation will introduce the goals and timeline of the two-year grant project and provide an opportunity for input at this very early stage.

Eric Miller
President, Zepheira

Abstract: The Web is the most successful communication platform ever conceived and is quickly evolving into the most pervasive knowledge sharing platform imaginable. Linked Data enables this knowledge sharing platform by leveraging the Web as an architecture for connecting data, lowering social and technical barriers for sharing connections and accelerating social computing. This presentation will provide an overview of Linked Data and discuss the evolving technical, social and policy trends that are shaping the application of these technologies (such as BIBFRAME) by the Library community. This talk will further demonstrate practical uses of these technologies and demonstrate how they may be used to lower costs, accelerate collaboration beyond our traditional community walls and provide new ways to support users need to discover, curate and remix relevant information.

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Event SAC GFIS Working Group on LCGFT Literature Terms

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Wed, Dec 18, 2013 at 07:22 pm

Meeting of the working group

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Discussion CaMMS Forum Powerpoints, 2012 Annual, Anaheim, CA

by Erin Stalberg on Fri, Aug 24, 2012 at 08:12 am

"Reimagining the library catalog: changing user needs, changing functionality"

"Reimagining the library catalog: changing user needs, changing functionality"

Do we need to change our perspective on what the catalog should be doing based on changes in the education and economic environment? What is needed, what could be changed, and what would be worth retaining, taking economic realities and educational goals into consideration? It has been argued that catalogs are not giving users what they need nor taking into account how they search. There is an objection to cataloging favoring the 1% using the library for research at the expense of the 99%. If cataloging practice is biased toward scholarly research, and we are able to change the bias, will this change the overall quality of education? If the bias is changed in favor of non-scholarly uses, how does the Library of Congress respond? What are the identifiable changes in scholarly discovery in the web environment that could change our perspectives on cataloging support of research?

Speakers:

  • James Weinheimer, Information Consultant, Rome, Italy
  • Kevin Ford, Digital Project Coordinator, Network Development and MARC Standards Office, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.
  • John Myers, Catalog Librarian, Schaffer Library,
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Contributes to library service and librarianship through encouragement, promotion of, and responsibility for those activities of ALCTS relating to the cataloging and classification of information resources using both developed and developing metadata structure and content standards, and the use of these standards to provide intellectual access to and organization of information resources in both traditional and non-traditional settings.

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