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In: Association for Library Collections and Technical Services (ALCTS), Cataloging, Collection Development, Collection Management, Preservation, Special Collections, Technical Services

The Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS) congratulates Melanie Church, content services librarian at Greenlease Library, Rockhurst University in Kansas City, Mo., as the recipient of the 2016 First Step Award—A Wiley Professional Development Grant presented by the ALCTS Continuing Resources Section. The award will be presented on Saturday, June 25, at the ALCTS Awards Ceremony during the 2016 American Library Association (ALA) Annual Conference and Exposition in Orlando, Florida.

Sunday, April 24 kicks off the 6th annual Preservation Week, a national awareness campaign developed by the Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS). Established in 2010, Preservation Week promotes the importance and understanding of protecting and caring for personal and community cultural heritage collections, including books, documents, photographs, textiles, artwork, furniture and any other collectible items.

The Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS) congratulates the recipient of the 2016 Ulrich’s Serials Librarianship Award, Bonnie Parks. Presented by the Continuing Resources Section (CRS) of ALCTS, this award consists of a citation and $1,500 donated by ProQuest and is given for distinguished contributions to serials librarianship. The award will be presented at the ALCTS Awards Ceremony on June 25 during the 2016 American Library Association Annual Conference and Exposition in Orlando.

The Acquisitions Section of the Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS) has selected Jim Mouw, associate university librarian for collection services at the University of Chicago, to receive the 2016 HARRASSOWITZ Leadership in Library Acquisitions Award. The award will be presented on June 25 at the ALCTS Awards Ceremony during the 2016 American Library Association (ALA) Annual Conference and Exhibition in Orlando.

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Online Doc Learn about the future of the cloud of things at ALCTS President’s Program in Orlando

by Keri Cascio-IL (staff) on Fri, Mar 11, 2016 at 01:31 pm

Dr. Michael R. Nelson, Public Policy, CloudFlare and Adjunct Professor, Internet Studies, at Georgetown University, is the featured speaker at the President’s Program of the Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS). The President’s Program “The Future of the Internet and the ‘Cloud of Things’” will be held at 10:30 a.m. on Monday, June 27, 2016 during the American Library Association (ALA) Annual Conference in Orlando.

Dr. Michael R. Nelson, Public Policy, CloudFlare and Adjunct Professor, Internet Studies, at Georgetown University, is the featured speaker at the President’s Program of the Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS). The President’s Program “The Future of the Internet and the ‘Cloud of Things’” will be held at 10:30 a.m. on Monday, June 27, 2016 during the American Library Association (ALA) Annual Conference in Orlando.

In the coming ten years, we will see more new tools and business models than in the last twenty-five. Cloud technology combined with broadband wireless, sensors, Big Data and machine learning will transform how we interact with information and will fundamentally change the way we interact with the world and each other. Dr. Nelson will discuss principles (open standards, the free flow of information, transparency and empowering users) that will allow these coming changes to benefit people globally.

Dr. Nelson works on Internet-related global public policy issues for CloudFlare, a startup that has improved the performance and security of more than 2 million websites. Prior to joining CloudFlare, he was a principal technology policy strategist in Microsoft’s Technology Policy Group, a senior Technology and Telecommunications Analyst with Bloomberg Government and director of Internet technology and strategy at IBM.

Prior to joining IBM, Dr. Nelson was director for technology policy at the Federal Communications Commission, where he helped craft policies to foster electronic commerce and spur development and deployment of new technologies. Before that Dr. Nelson was the special assistant for information technology at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. There he worked with Vice President Gore and the President's science advisor on issues relating to the Global Information Infrastructure, including telecommunications policy, information technology, encryption, electronic commerce and information policy.

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Online Doc Call for Book Chapters – Textbooks and Academic Libraries

by Keri Cascio-IL (staff) on Wed, Feb 24, 2016 at 01:40 pm

Proposal call: chapters for an ALCTS publication on collecting/managing textbooks in Academic Libraries
Proposal submission deadline: April 1st, 2016
Publisher: Association of Library Collections & Technical Services
Editor: Chris Diaz, Collection Management Librarian at National Louis University  

The Association of Collections & Technical Services is seeking proposals for case studies, literature reviews, research, and essays on how academic libraries are responding to the demand for textbooks.

Proposal call: chapters for an ALCTS publication on collecting/managing textbooks in Academic Libraries
Proposal submission deadline: April 1st, 2016
Publisher: Association of Library Collections & Technical Services
Editor: Chris Diaz, Collection Management Librarian at National Louis University  

The Association of Collections & Technical Services is seeking proposals for case studies, literature reviews, research, and essays on how academic libraries are responding to the demand for textbooks.

College textbook prices rise every year, and students are looking for affordable alternatives, such as purchasing used copies, renting copies for a limited time, or not purchasing a copy at all. Students, faculty, and campus administrators naturally look to the library for support. Librarians are finding creative ways to help accommodate the demand for textbooks and other course materials through electronic textbook initiatives, open textbook projects, and partnerships with publishers and bookstores.

How has your library responded to this demand?

We seek proposals on strategy, assessment, implementation, communication, research, and management of library initiatives to manage textbooks, open educational resources, or other course materials, along with changes to policy or practice.

Possible chapter topics:

* What involvement do academic libraries have – or should have – in supporting textbooks?
* What successful practices has your library implemented in regards to funding, implementing, and/or managing textbook projects?
* What opportunities or challenges are presented to academic libraries with the increasing availability of electronic textbooks and course materials?
* How might academic library collections support the delivery of electronic textbooks?
* Is your library working with campus partners, such as the book store, university press, or IT department, to deliver course materials? What’s working and what’s not?
* Have programs or courses on your campus adopted open textbooks or open educational resources? If so, what worked and what didn’t?
* What effect do electronic textbooks have on student learning outcomes, retention, and/or reading experience?

Proposals should include:

* Author name(s)
* Brief author(s) bio
* Proposed chapter title
* A summary of the proposed chapter (300-500) words

Authors of selected proposals will be notified by April 15, 2016.  Full chapters are expected by August 1, 2016 (3,000-5,000 words).  Chapters should be unique to this publication – no previously published or simultaneously submitted materials.

For additional information, please contact: Chris Diaz, Collection Management Librarian at National Louis University, cdiaz10@nl.edu

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Event ALCTS Virtual Preconference Session 1: Automating Descriptive Metadata Creation

by Gina Solares on Fri, May 20, 2016 at 04:25 pm

ALCTS Virtual Preconference: 
We Can Do It, You Can Too! Metadata Automation for Everyone

Session 1: Automating Descriptive Metadata Creation: Tools and Workflows

Date & Time:

Tuesday, June 7 starting at 11 a.m. Pacific | 12 p.m. Mountain | 1 p.m. Central | 2 p.m. Eastern

ALCTS Virtual Preconference: 
We Can Do It, You Can Too! Metadata Automation for Everyone

Session 1: Automating Descriptive Metadata Creation: Tools and Workflows

Date & Time:

Tuesday, June 7 starting at 11 a.m. Pacific | 12 p.m. Mountain | 1 p.m. Central | 2 p.m. Eastern

This 90-minute session will examine workflows for automating the creation of descriptive metadata. Presenters will demonstrate tools such as XSLT/XPath/XProc, JavaScript, and Open Refine for generating and refining metadata as well as Google Forms for collecting and identifying descriptive metadata elements.

Learning Objectives:

Understand best tools for gathering descriptive metadata content for your library
Ability to implement workflows for metadata in digital files

Presentation Titles & Presenters:

Migrating ETDs from Dublin Core to MODS: Automated processes for metadata enhancement​
​Presented by ​Annie Glerum, Head of Complex Cataloging, Florida State University Libraries and ​Dominique Bortmas, Metadata Librarian, University of South Florida Libraries

Abstract: When migrating from one metadata scheme to another, the most efficient method is a direct crosswalk of corresponding elements. This method is effective for migrating from a fuller schema, like MARCXML or MODS, to a more brief one, like Dublin Core or Qualified Dublin Core. However, when migrating from a thin schema to a thick one, a simple crosswalk excludes the potential of rich metadata that a fuller schema allows. This presentation demonstrates how to create a second source of data for a transformation of Qualified Dublin Core to MODS by using Javascript in Adobe Acrobat's Action Wizard to batch convert PDFs to XML then XProc to run multiple XSLTs for reformatting and cleaning up the harvested bibliographic data. The Qualified Dublin Core to MODS XSLT includes modular transformations for formatting names and titles, standardizing capitalization, converting character encoding to UTF8, and assigning broad LCSH based on Qualified Dublin Core disciplines or departments. In turn, the modular transformations reference XML tables for capitalization, departments, subjects, and Unicode characters.

Along with examples of how this process can be adapted for your organization, the presentation concludes with examples of other XML technologies that have been modified to accommodate local needs.reference by attendees.

Finding a New Metadata M.O.: Metadata Automation on a Budget at a Medium-Sized Institution
​Presented by Joseph R. Nicholson, Metadata Librarian at University of North Carolina-Charlotte

Abstract: At UNC Charlotte, ambitious plans for digital projects in Islandora, the institution’s new repository, confronted several major obstacles: staff shortages, skill deficits, and the difficulties of moving from an out-of-the-box digital asset management system to an open source product. Compounding these difficulties, recent commitments to granting agencies and donors required the library to shift very quickly from a boutique to a mass-digitization production model and yet to describe materials at a level of detail uncommon in mass-digitization projects. Authority control was an essential ingredient of the projects, as was the ability to leverage local authority control efforts to produce a stream of new authority records to contribute to the NACO program. In addition, UNC Charlotte needed a way of seamlessly incorporating donor-contributed metadata into workflows, a requirement of one of the projects. The incommensurateness of the ambitious scope of the projects with the library resources available initially threatened to hamstring the library’s new digitization efforts. Data conversion tools like Open Refine and XSLT, neither of which UNC Charlotte had used extensively in the past, as well as a carefully considered use of Excel spreadsheets and Google forms, have been essential in helping the organization overcome these obstacles. This presentation will focus on UNC Charlotte’s use of several of these tools to swiftly create, clean, organize, and transform metadata created from several different sources in spreadsheets and Google Forms. In particular, it will spotlight how UNC Charlotte has used Open Refine’s templating functions and XSLT both to transform descriptive spreadsheet metadata into XML of various flavors and to parlay authority data recorded by non-specialists into MARC.

For more information, including how to register, visit the 2016 ALCTS Virtual Preconference web page. http://www.ala.org/alcts/events/ac/2016/vc-sess1

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Event ALCTS Virtual Preconference Session 2: Automating Legacy Data Cleanup Projects

by Gina Solares on Thu, May 19, 2016 at 11:54 am

ALCTS Virtual Preconference: 
We Can Do It, You Can Too! Metadata Automation for Everyone

Session 1: Automating Legacy Data Cleanup Projects

Date & Time:

Wednesday, June 8 starting at 11 a.m. Pacific | 12 p.m. Mountain | 1 p.m. Central | 2 p.m. Eastern

This 90-minute session will demonstrate two case studies for automating clean-up processes for legacy data. Presenters will demonstrate workflows and use of tools such as MARCEdit, and Open Refine for batch editing large retrospective projects.

ALCTS Virtual Preconference: 
We Can Do It, You Can Too! Metadata Automation for Everyone

Session 1: Automating Legacy Data Cleanup Projects

Date & Time:

Wednesday, June 8 starting at 11 a.m. Pacific | 12 p.m. Mountain | 1 p.m. Central | 2 p.m. Eastern

This 90-minute session will demonstrate two case studies for automating clean-up processes for legacy data. Presenters will demonstrate workflows and use of tools such as MARCEdit, and Open Refine for batch editing large retrospective projects.

Learning Objectives:

Ability to automate the cleanup of legacy metadata
Understand tools for metadata refinement and conversion

Presentation Titles & Presenters:

Editing Legacy Metadata for ETDs: Description of a Best Practice Using the MARCEdit Plug-In Tool
Presented by Marielle Veve, Metadata Librarian, University of North Florida

Abstract: As the standards for describing & encoding metadata for electronic theses and dissertations (ETD) constantly change, so is the need to go back and retrospectively edit records that are not in accordance with the new rules. The process of retrospectively editing individual ETD records to meet new standards can be grueling and time-consuming, but with the creation of new tools and developments it does not have to be that way anymore.

Looking Back, Moving Forward: A Large-Scale Metadata Remediation Effort
Presented by Maggie Dickson, Metadata Architect, Duke University

Abstract: In 2016, Duke University Libraries is migrating all of its digital collections to our new Fedora/Hydra/Blacklight-based platform, Tripod 3. In preparation for this migration, we are undertaking a large-scale remediation of all descriptive metadata, which consists of more than 1.6 million statements about approximately 112,000 items, created over the course of twenty years, by many different people, and using many different schemas and standards (or not). We have formed a task group to make decisions, identify and engage stakeholders, and guide the workflow. This involves reviewing existing properties and values and evaluating the adoption of standards and vocabularies, with an eye toward linked open data and sharing our resources with the DPLA and beyond. The remediation itself (which at the time of this proposal is ongoing) is being completed using OpenRefine, scripting, and many good old spreadsheets. This presentation will describe the process, its challenges and successes , and future directions.

For more information, including how to register, visit the 2016 ALCTS Virtual Preconference web page. http://www.ala.org/alcts/events/ac/2016/vc

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Discussion Call for Volunteers: ALA Annual Preservation Week Booth

by Brooke Morris (staff) on Wed, May 11, 2016 at 10:37 am

Support Preservation Week and help advocate for the preservation of our collections, in all forms and formats. You don’t need to be an expert. Just bring your passion for preservation and we’ll provide talking points and have information on hand to help direct colleagues in need to valuable preservation resources.

Regular Exhibit hours are:

Friday, 6/24 - 5:30pm -7pm (booth set up between 8am and 4pm)

Saturday, 6/25 -  9am - 5pm

Sunday, 6/26 -  9am - 5pm

Support Preservation Week and help advocate for the preservation of our collections, in all forms and formats. You don’t need to be an expert. Just bring your passion for preservation and we’ll provide talking points and have information on hand to help direct colleagues in need to valuable preservation resources.

Regular Exhibit hours are:

Friday, 6/24 - 5:30pm -7pm (booth set up between 8am and 4pm)

Saturday, 6/25 -  9am - 5pm

Sunday, 6/26 -  9am - 5pm

Monday, 6/27 - 9am - 2pm

Shifts are generally an hour+ depending on your availability.

If you are interested in participating at ALA Annual or a future conference, please contact Robin Hutchison (r-hutchison@tamu.edu).

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Discussion Action needed: FY 2017 House Appropriations Bill

by Keri Cascio-IL (staff) on Mon, May 2, 2016 at 09:13 am

ALA and ALCTS have issued a letter the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Appropriations with a request to remove the “Library of Congress Classification” amendment from the FY 2017 Legislative Branch Appropriations legislation.

ALA and ALCTS have issued a letter the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Appropriations with a request to remove the “Library of Congress Classification” amendment from the FY 2017 Legislative Branch Appropriations legislation.

In March, the Library of Congress (LC) posted their decision to replace the terms “Aliens” with “Noncitizens,” and “Illegal aliens” with two headings: “Noncitizens” and/or “Unauthorized immigration.” ALA and ALCTS ask that the Appropriations Committee strike language in legislation just adopted by its Legislative Branch Subcommittee that would bar LC from implementing an appropriate and thoroughly researched change in its subject heading classifications.

 The Committee on Appropriations will be meeting later in May for a markup meeting regarding the proposed appropriations legislation with this amendment. The language of the bill with the amended text has not yet been released to the public. We will notify members when the markup meeting is scheduled.

What can you do now?

  • Get involved: National Library Legislative Day is May 2-3, 2016. You can get involved by going to Washington to speak with your Representative or making a commitment to the Virtual National Library Legislative Day online (track the tag #NLLD16)
  • Use your voice: Contact the members of the Committee on Appropriations to ask them to strike the language from the legislation in the markup meeting (Note: Many Representatives will not accept email correspondence from those who live outside their districts)
  • Spread the word: Share this information with colleagues and friends, and ask them to act
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Discussion Brad Meltzer to sign latest Book at Preservation Week booth

by Brooke Morris (staff) on Thu, Apr 28, 2016 at 04:29 pm

On Sunday, June 26 New York Times best-selling author, television host and library advocate Brad Meltzer will sign copies of his latest book at the Preservation Week booth at 1 p.m. Meltzer is the 2016 Preservation Week Honorary Chair and will be an Auditorium Speaker at  10:30-11:30 a.m. on June 26 at the ALA Annual Conference in Orlando.

On Sunday, June 26 New York Times best-selling author, television host and library advocate Brad Meltzer will sign copies of his latest book at the Preservation Week booth at 1 p.m. Meltzer is the 2016 Preservation Week Honorary Chair and will be an Auditorium Speaker at  10:30-11:30 a.m. on June 26 at the ALA Annual Conference in Orlando.

Brad Meltzer’s catalogue of best-sellers include "The Inner Circle," "The Book of Fate" and several thrillers, including “The Tenth Justice,” “Dead Even,” “The First Counsel,” “The Millionaires,” “The Zero Game,” “The Book of Lies”  and “The Fifth Assassin.” His latest thriller “The President’s Shadow” will be available in June. In addition to writing thrillers, Meltzer has authored non-fiction, children’s books and comics. His non-fiction titles “History Decoded,” “Heroes for My Son” and “Heroes for My Daughter” were best-sellers, and his comic "Justice League of America" won the prestigious Eisner Award.

The author of more than 20 books, Meltzer has penned novels for an array of audiences, including history buffs and children. As the host of Brad Meltzer’s “Lost History” on H2 and Brad Meltzer’s “Decoded” on the History Channel, Meltzer has been a champion of historical preservation, making him the ideal Preservation Week Honorary Chair. As Honorary Chair, Meltzer has been featured in print and digital Preservation Week promotional materials and audio PSAs and has participated in interviews with the media.

Brad Meltzer will be doing his first book signing for Preservation Week at the 2016 Annual Conference in Orlando, and his appearance at the conference and Preservation Week booth is sponsored by Penguin Young Readers. Meltzer will be signing copies of “Ordinary People: I Am Martin Luther King, Jr.,” the latest book in his “Ordinary People” series, at 1 p.m. on Sunday, June 26, in the Preservation Week booth.

Established in 2010, Preservation Week is supported by the Association for Library Collections and Technical Services (ALCTS), a division of the American Library Association (ALA). Preservation Week promotes the importance and understanding of protecting and caring for personal and community cultural heritage collections, including books, documents, photographs, textiles, artwork, furniture and any other collectible items. Since its inception, Preservation Week has assisted libraries in providing their communities with a variety of resources and event ideas for furthering the public’s awareness and practice of preservation. Each year, libraries, archives and museums across the U.S. and around the globe celebrate Preservation Week with a range of unique events and activities.

For more information on Preservation Week, visit www.ala.org/alcts/preservationweek

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Event ALCTS webinar: Current Trends & New Skills in Technical Services

by Gina Solares on Thu, Apr 28, 2016 at 11:10 am

 

ALCTS webinar: Current Trends & New Skills in Technical Services

Date: Wednesday, May 18, 2016

All webinars are one hour in length and begin at 11am Pacific, noon Mountain, 1pm Central, and 2pm Eastern time.

This session is part 2 of the 2-part series, The Future of Technical Services:

 

ALCTS webinar: Current Trends & New Skills in Technical Services

Date: Wednesday, May 18, 2016

All webinars are one hour in length and begin at 11am Pacific, noon Mountain, 1pm Central, and 2pm Eastern time.

This session is part 2 of the 2-part series, The Future of Technical Services:

  1. Is Technical Services Dead? An Overview of the Future of Traditional Services

  2. Current Trends & New Skills in Technical Services

Description: In this webinar, presenters will explore current trends and developments in library technical services and discuss how they will impact the future of this field of librarianship. Participants will learn about hard skills (such as programming, language acquisition, time management, and metadata schema) and soft skills (such as collaboration, creativity, initiative, and overall attitude) that will be instrumental in his/her success in the future of technical services. A portion of the presentation will also explore the need for advocacy for technical services as our field continues to transition and evolve.

Learning outcomes:

Participants will learn about hard and soft skills needed for the future of technical services, discover resources to use in developing these skills, and discover ways to advocate these needs for our future evolution.

Who should attend?

Professionals, paraprofessionals, and library science students who work in or who would like to work in technical services.

Presenters:

Erin E. Boyd is the Technical Services Supervisor at the Irving (TX) Public Library where she is responsible for overseeing all cataloging and processing. Previous to this position, she worked as a cataloger in academic libraries. An active ALCTS member, Erin currently serves as Director-at-Large on the Board of Directors and as the ALCTS Representative on the ALA Website Advisory Committee.

Elyssa M. Gould is the Electronic Acquisitions & Serials Librarian at the University of Michigan Law Library where she is responsible for the entire e-resources lifecycle. Previous to this position, she worked as a cataloger in a general academic library. An active ALCTS member, Elyssa currently serves as a voting member on the Committee on Cataloging: Description and Access and as the LRTS Book Review Editor.

 

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Registration Fees:  

Single webinar: ALCTS Member $43 ; Non-member $59 ; Group rate (members/non-members) $99/$129 ; International $43   

Series pricing: ALCTS Member $69 ; Non-member $95 ; Group rate (members/non-members) $159/$206 ; International $69  

For additional information and access to registration links, please go to the following website:

http://www.ala.org/alcts/confevents/upcoming/webinar/051816

ALCTS webinars are recorded and registrants receive a link to the recording shortly following the live event.

For questions about registration, contact ALA Registration by calling 1-800-545-2433 and press 5 or email registration@ala.org. For all other questions or comments related to the webinars, contact Julie Reese, ALCTS Events Manager at 1-800-545-2433, ext. 5034 or alctsce@ala.org.

Posted on behalf of the ALCTS Continuing Education Committee.

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Discussion ALCTS ALA Annual Precon Delves into Reproducible Science

by Brooke Morris (staff) on Wed, Apr 27, 2016 at 03:41 pm

The credibility of scientific findings is under attack. Discover tools and techniques for managing data, enabling research transparency, and promoting reproducible science in the ALCTS Preconference The Quest for Reproducible Science: Issues in Research Transparency and Integrity at ALA Annual in Orlando.

The credibility of scientific findings is under attack. Discover tools and techniques for managing data, enabling research transparency, and promoting reproducible science in the ALCTS Preconference The Quest for Reproducible Science: Issues in Research Transparency and Integrity at ALA Annual in Orlando.

The Quest for Reproducible Science: Issues in Research Transparency and Integrity

ALA Annual Conference 2016

 Friday, June 24, 8:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.  |  event code: ALC3

Speakers: Victoria Stodden, Richard Ball, Harrison Dekker, Garret Christensen, Eleni Castro, Elizabeth Quigley, and Jake Carlson

Featuring scholars, librarians, and technologists, this innovative preconference will explore strategies for fostering and supporting transparent research practices, providing attendees with tools and techniques for organizing empirical research projects in such a way that they can be easily and exactly reproduced and immediately employed at their institutions. In addtion, participants will learn how to develop a research project on an open platform to manage data and other digital objects throughout the research lifecycle.

If you're a digital initiative librarian, data curator, scholarly communications librarian, metadata librarian, repository manager, library liaison, or social science instructor who teaches or advises students on empirical research methods this is the preconference for you!

Register today, and add this preconference to your conference registration or register for this preconference alone. 

Want to view more ALCTS preconference and conference events? Peruse our listing of preconferences and conference programs.  

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Event ALCTS webinar: Is Technical Services Dead? An Overview of the Future of Traditional Services

by Gina Solares on Mon, Apr 25, 2016 at 11:11 am

 

ALCTS webinar: Is Technical Services Dead? An Overview of the Future of Traditional Services

Date: Wednesday, May 11, 2016

All webinars are one hour in length and begin at 11am Pacific, noon Mountain, 1pm Central, and 2pm Eastern time.

This session is part 1 of the 2-part series, The Future of Technical Services:

  1. Is Technical Services Dead? An Overview of the Future of Traditional Services

 

ALCTS webinar: Is Technical Services Dead? An Overview of the Future of Traditional Services

Date: Wednesday, May 11, 2016

All webinars are one hour in length and begin at 11am Pacific, noon Mountain, 1pm Central, and 2pm Eastern time.

This session is part 1 of the 2-part series, The Future of Technical Services:

  1. Is Technical Services Dead? An Overview of the Future of Traditional Services

  2. Current Trends & New Skills in Technical Services

Description: The webinar considers a provocative question: Is technical services dead?

In the first part of the webinar, presenters discuss the recent past, the present and the future of cataloging and technical services. They will explore whether there is a future for “traditional” acquisitions and cataloging and other technical services skills. Can we continue to divide our attention between print materials and electronic, digital, and streaming media when there are new resources and responsibilities competing for our budgets and administrators’ attention?

In the second part of the webinar, they will explores metadata, MARC, and more and will address the questions: does MARC matter with RDA? Will RDA live up to its promise? Is schema agnostic preferable to using MARC, MODS, or Dublin Core? Is BIBFRAME a viable alternative to MARC?

Learning outcomes: Participants will discover ways to examine the skills and knowledge needed for contemporary technical services work and how these skills relate to traditional technical services.

Who should attend? Professionals, paraprofessionals, and library science students who work in or who would like to work in technical services.

Presenters:

Amy K. Weiss is the Head of Cataloging and Description at Florida State University. She previously worked at UC-Santa Barbara, Appalachian State University, and Ball State University. She is a Past-President of OLAC (Online Audiovisual Catalogers) and served from 2011-2012. She received her MLS from the University of Maryland College Park.

Julie Moore is the Special Collections Catalog Librarian at the Henry Madden Library, California State University, Fresno. She previously worked at Rutgers University Libraries, Alaska Resources Library and Information Services, Stetson University, and Saint Leo College. She is an active OLAC member, currently serving on its Cataloging and Policy Committee (CAPC). She received the OLAC Nancy B. Olson Award in 2010. Her MA LIS is from University of South Florida.

 

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Registration Fees:  

Single webinar: ALCTS Member $43 ; Non-member $59 ; Group rate (members/non-members) $99/$129 ; International $43   

Series pricing: ALCTS Member $69 ; Non-member $95 ; Group rate (members/non-members) $159/$206 ; International $69  

For additional information and access to registration links, please go to the following website:

http://www.ala.org/alcts/confevents/upcoming/webinar/051116

ALCTS webinars are recorded and registrants receive a link to the recording shortly following the live event.

For questions about registration, contact ALA Registration by calling 1-800-545-2433 and press 5 or email registration@ala.org. For all other questions or comments related to the webinars, contact Julie Reese, ALCTS Events Manager at 1-800-545-2433, ext. 5034 or alctsce@ala.org.

Posted on behalf of the ALCTS Continuing Education Committee.

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The mission of the Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS) is to shape and respond nimbly to all matters related to the selection, identification, acquisition, organization, management, retrieval, and preservation of recorded knowledge through education, publication, and collaboration.

Learn more about ALCTS on the ALA website.

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