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Suggestion An Argument for Radical Self-Publication: Author-Publishers from Sir Walter Scott to Stephen King

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Fri, Apr 1, 2016 at 02:22 pm
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Points: 4

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Description: This session will make an argument for recognizing the potential value of authors who release their own books with their publishing ventures. Too many reviewers and acquisition representatives reject books if the publisher’s name and the author’s is the same, but some of the best radical non-conformist books of the last two centuries have been written by author-publishers.

Description: This session will make an argument for recognizing the potential value of authors who release their own books with their publishing ventures. Too many reviewers and acquisition representatives reject books if the publisher’s name and the author’s is the same, but some of the best radical non-conformist books of the last two centuries have been written by author-publishers. The mainstream publishing industry has popularized the notion that self-published books must be inferior to refereed works because they have a wild, uncontrolled element not only to their grammar, but also to the type of subversive tales they might be spinning. Five of Britain’s and three of America’s classical writers would never have written some of their most brilliant projects if they did not personally invest into establishing their own publishing businesses, where they had a majority control. Once they had this financial control, they could self-publish radical novels and philosophy, such as: A Tale of Two Cities (Charles Dickens/ All the Year Round), Waverley (Sir Walter Scott/ Ballantyne), “The Vision of Judgment” & “Lines to a Critic” (Lord Byron and Percy Shelley/ The Liberal), Monday or Tuesday (Virginia Woolf/ Hogarth Press), Humanist Manifestos I and II (Paul Kurtz/ Prometheus Books), “Voluminous History of the Little Longfellow War” (Edgar Allan Poe/ Broadway Journal), and The Spirit Journey (Alice Walker/ Wild Trees Press). Many popular novelists, including Stephen King, have also experimented with self-publishing electronic and online editions of their work. All of the featured writers faced censorship or other publishing hurdles that prevented them from being released until their authors were independently self-published. A version of this research, focusing on Walker, was presented at SAMLA, and Faktorovich is currently writing a scholarly book on this topic. Questions and discussion on self and author-publishing will be warmly invited at the end of the presentation.

Presenter: Anna Faktorovich

Format: Lecture

Types of libraries: Academic, Library School, Other, Public

Subjects: Acquisitions, Assessment and Evaluation, Collection Development, Equity of Access, Guidelines and Standards, Intellectual Freedom, Intellectual Property, Popular Culture

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Suggestion Preserving Assets, Maximizing Investments: A New Model in Library Service Center Design

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 7, 2016 at 02:05 pm
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Points: 4

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Description: How do higher education planners move libraries beyond traditional paradigms of stockpiling assets, to embracing a “new frontier” of preserving precious information assets while maximizing investments? Partnerships, land development, technology, information flow, and efficient building planning are integral in the changing dynamic 21st century library model.

Description: How do higher education planners move libraries beyond traditional paradigms of stockpiling assets, to embracing a “new frontier” of preserving precious information assets while maximizing investments? Partnerships, land development, technology, information flow, and efficient building planning are integral in the changing dynamic 21st century library model.

Emory University and Georgia Institute of Technology have broadened their existing partnership by jointly developing the off-campus Library Service Center of Emory and Georgia Tech. This successful partnership is redefining how higher education can think about re-investing in the campus itself by changing the traditional library model to take advantage of on- and off-campus spaces.

This partnership forges a new frontier in higher education planning in multiple ways:

By designing one facility to house two separate library collections under one roof, economic value is shared by each institution. As a “100 year building,” the investment made to design, construct and maintain this type of facility is minimized when shared by a partnership over time. Further, each institution benefits from the formation of a mixed compendium of information, which provides expanded research service for both institutions.

Moreover, by moving traditional library resources off-campus, on-campus resources can be utilized in a more innovative and efficient way. Each institution can re-envision their use of existing library space, which provides an investment in the campus itself. Emory will now be able to move forward with their master plan of the expansion of the main campus library. Georgia Institute of Technology is moving towards a total digital library, but is able to preserve, access, and maintain its investment in tangible materials.

Main campus learning objectives are supported by the off-site facility as well, through information technology and state-of-the-art cataloging and sorting delivery systems. Online systems and the Internet will provide a faster, more robust transfer of information. Users will also be able to visit a reading room in the Center to consult research materials and then have the materials delivered to an on-campus site.

Land use investment can be achieved as well. In the case of Emory, by identifying undeveloped land suitable for a new building provides value for the university.

Overall, the Library Service Center of Emory and Georgia Tech accomplishes many goals at once—it creates one collection, at one location, with optimal storage, robust service, and room for future growth.

It makes sense in this day and age, as universities understand how they compete with one another, that they’re naturally finding complementary programs. This will happen again. If you go to any region, it’s going to be served by institutions that have created identities — unique identities that allow them to complement other institutions in their immediate regions. They’re not duplicates. And if they’re not duplicates, the EmTech model helps institutions to preserve their assets and maximize investments—economically, on less square footage, and through a collaborative partnership.

Presenters: Scot Murdoch, Jay Forrest & Charles Forrest

Format: Panel Discussion

Types of libraries: Academic, Information-related Organization, Joint Use, Library School, Nonprofit, Research Library, School/Media Center, Student, Undergraduate

Subjects: Administration and Management, Archives, Buildings and Facilities, Digitial Libraries, Electronic Resources, Institutional Repositories, Partnerships, Preservation, Resource Sharing, Special Collections, Strategic Planning, Transforming Libraries

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Suggestion How to get beyond the ‘Agree’ button in Privacy Policies: making privacy awareness an everyday topic in libraries.

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Fri, Apr 1, 2016 at 02:43 pm
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Points: 15

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Description: A discussion of privacy and data-literacy training in the New York metropolitan area, including current initiatives at the New York Public Library and the Brooklyn Public Library. How to work with data-mapping resources and with privacy technologists to find better ways to better help frontline librarians.

The talk will be led by Bill Marden, the newly-appointed Director of Data Privacy at the New York Public Library, and Bonnie Tijerina, fellow at the Data & Society Institute in New York City and founder of Electronic Resources & Libraries.

Suggestion Capitalizing on the Potential of Student Library Employees

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Fri, Apr 1, 2016 at 02:42 pm
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Points: 16

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Description: Employing students opens a well of questioning (peer education, managerial best practices, student engagement, etc.) and an equally deep well of possibility. Via research, conference attendance, and collegial conversations, I’ve found that a significant number of librarians (including myself) grapple with the benefits and dilemmas posed by employing students. However, unlike the rich professional communities supporting and informing other facets of our practice, I have yet to find a comparable community for librarians who work with student employees.

Description: Employing students opens a well of questioning (peer education, managerial best practices, student engagement, etc.) and an equally deep well of possibility. Via research, conference attendance, and collegial conversations, I’ve found that a significant number of librarians (including myself) grapple with the benefits and dilemmas posed by employing students. However, unlike the rich professional communities supporting and informing other facets of our practice, I have yet to find a comparable community for librarians who work with student employees.

I’ve joined outside organizations like the CRLA (College Reading & Learning Association) and have worked with academic support centers (such as writing or tutoring centers) on my current and past campuses. These outside partners resolutely affirm the value of student employees and I would like to see that sentiment more strongly evidenced in the field of librarianship. We do ourselves a disservice if we disregard the promise that student employees hold.

During this conversation starter we’ll discuss how libraries currently employ students, how we can further capitalize on student employee potential, and how we can support each other in this pursuit. The session will include beginning a roster of librarians interested in forming a professional community (the shape of which would be based on the feedback of those interested) around best practices for employing students.

Prompts aligning with the three broad topics above will be provided (with supporting context and research) to facilitate the conversation. Attendees will also be strongly encouraged to propose discussion topics. The scope of the conversation will include the interests of any librarian who works with student employees, whether in a school media center, an undergraduate library, a special library, and so on.

Presenter: Naomi Faith Stuesser

Format: Facilitated Discussion

Types of libraries: Academic, Community College, High School, Library School, Middle School, Public, Research Library, School/Media Center, Special, Student, Undergraduate

Subjects: Human Resources, Instruction, Librarianship, Reference Services, Training, Transforming Libraries

Additional comments: I would like to highlight that if this proposal is accepted it would not only serve as a conversation starter at the conference, but also includes a plan to continue that discussion, through the formation of professional community.

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Suggestion User Experience for Community Patrons

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Fri, Apr 1, 2016 at 02:42 pm
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Points: 8

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Description: Public libraries contain a multifaceted patron base and librarians must act as chameleons, adjusting their methods in order to adequately address patron needs. It can be challenging to maintain a system of methods, as patron and their needs change over time, but librarians can ask questions or observe factors to quickly gain the insight on a patron’s need and exercise fundamental strategies to improve the user’s experience.

Description: Public libraries contain a multifaceted patron base and librarians must act as chameleons, adjusting their methods in order to adequately address patron needs. It can be challenging to maintain a system of methods, as patron and their needs change over time, but librarians can ask questions or observe factors to quickly gain the insight on a patron’s need and exercise fundamental strategies to improve the user’s experience.

There are certain factors that library staff will discover through an initial interaction. For example, the factor could be time-sensitive if a patron (not familiar with reading law material) seeks resources on a specific case in employment law. A satisfactory user experience solution to this case would be to quickly provide the user with a graspable resource, as well as providing the user with the contact information to their local bar association. Another example is if a patron from the local community enters a nearby academic library, seeking access to resources. In this case, proximity may have been the deciding factor. When this happens, staff should be prepared with a list of the closest public libraries in the area.

In addition to determining factors, you can ask questions. If you work in an academic library, you may (if you have not already) still encounter patrons from the community. In an academic library, it is common that community patrons are not allowed access to physical resources (i.e. books and media). However, this is not where you should stop the interaction. Library staff should ask questions like, “What do you want to do with this information?” or “How much time do you have?” The responses to these questions could help you determine the next step that the patron should take.

In my presentation, I will convey how to use common factors such as time, proximity, etc. to adjust methodology to deliver a suitable user experience. I will also provide some tips on best practices to provide community patrons with an exceptional user experience, as well as promote discussion between attendees on their methods of assisting patrons in the community.

Presenter: Liza Lèreese Booker

Format: Facilitated Discussion

Types of libraries: Academic, Association, Community College, Consortium, Government, Information-related Organization, Law, Public, Research Library, State Library

Subjects: Adult Services, Community Engagement, Continuing Education, Professional Development, Public Relations, Public Services, Reference Services, Urban Libraries

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Suggestion So What Can I Do With an MLIS? Broadening Your View.

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Fri, Apr 1, 2016 at 02:41 pm
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Points: 19

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Description: According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the occupation of "Librarian" will grow 7% from 2012-2022 compared to 11% in other occupations. However, BLS also states an expected increase in demand for librarians in research and special libraries. Even if you’ve never considered it, now is a good time to look into other nontraditional positions for Information Professionals. Opening your mind to other Information Agencies could really improve your odds in the job search.

Suggestion Framing Our Digital Dwellings: How We Build Our Online Information Environments

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Fri, Apr 1, 2016 at 02:41 pm
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Points: 19

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Description: As people increasingly rely on the Internet for news and other information, they begin to build digital environments around themselves. They follow, like, and subscribe to information sources that suit their interests and needs. Over time, as these environments become more robust and people grow more comfortable in their digital dwellings, they begin to transition from active searchers to passive consumers of information. What should we call these digital dwellings?

Description: As people increasingly rely on the Internet for news and other information, they begin to build digital environments around themselves. They follow, like, and subscribe to information sources that suit their interests and needs. Over time, as these environments become more robust and people grow more comfortable in their digital dwellings, they begin to transition from active searchers to passive consumers of information. What should we call these digital dwellings? Several terms exist to describe our digital information environments, but none seem to exist to describe the environments we build ourselves for our own personal use. Digital learning environments, the filter bubble, the echo chamber, the reinforcing spiral are all similar or related, but they describe very specific phenomena and leave little room for broader application.

In this session, we’ll look at how people construct their personal digital environments, and we’ll discuss how the concepts listed above don’t adequately describe those environments. Finally, we’ll look at the transition from active searcher to passive consumer and its impact on how a person interacts with new information.

Presenter: Brandy Rene' Horne

Format: Lecture

Types of libraries: Academic, Public, Research Library, Undergraduate

Subjects: Information Literacy, Instruction, Knowledge Management, Librarianship, Reference Services, Social Change, Social Media & Networks, Technology, Trends and Forecasting

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Suggestion Libraries, Archives, Museums – Better Together

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Fri, Apr 1, 2016 at 02:40 pm
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Points: 23

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Description: We are a unique and diverse cohort of professionals from library, archives and museum (LAM) organizations. We represent a range of institutions, from the Smithsonian to Tulare County Library (CA) to American Samoa Office of Archives and Records, and more. We have joined together in the Collective Wisdom LAM Conference Exchange project.

Description: We are a unique and diverse cohort of professionals from library, archives and museum (LAM) organizations. We represent a range of institutions, from the Smithsonian to Tulare County Library (CA) to American Samoa Office of Archives and Records, and more. We have joined together in the Collective Wisdom LAM Conference Exchange project. Our mission is to break through the barriers between libraries, archives and museums, and explore cross-sector culture, policies, and practices, especially related to the continuing education and professional development of our workforce. Find out what we’ve learned about getting out of our silos. Join this ongoing conversation to share your ideas and visions for creating a strong LAM network that delivers high-quality services to our communities.\

Presenter: Betha Gutsche

Format: Facilitated Discussion

Types of libraries: Academic, Association, Federal, Government, Information-related Organization, Museum, Nonprofit, Public, Research Library, Rural, Special, State Library

Subjects: Advocacy, Archives, Community Engagement, Continuing Education, Digitial Libraries, Information Commons, Leadership, Networking, Organizational Change, Partnerships, Professional Development, Resource Sharing, Special Collections, Transforming Libraries, Virtual Communities and Libraries

Additional comments: The Collective Wisdom LAM Conference Exchange cohort members will also attend major conferences in the museum sector (AAM in May) and archives sector (SAA in August). They are seeking opportunities to share their insights and activities at each conference. This Conversation Starter event would be an excellent venue for them to connect with other ALA attendees.

The Collective Wisdom cohort is sponsored by the Coalition to Advance Learning across Archives, Libraries and Museums (Coalition), which works in deliberate coordination across organizational boundaries to devise and strengthen sustainable continuing education and professional development programs that will transform the archives, library, and museum workforce in ways that lead to measurable impact on our nation’s communities. The Coalition is interested in increasing understanding of trends, issues, and opportunities, and raising the visibility of existing cross-sector CE/PD partnerships and collaboration. The Coalition is funded by IMLS and administered by OCLC.

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Suggestion Libraries, Archives, Museums – Better Together

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Fri, Apr 1, 2016 at 02:40 pm
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Points: 4

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Description: We are a unique and diverse cohort of professionals from library, archives and museum (LAM) organizations. We represent a range of institutions, from the Smithsonian to Tulare County Library (CA) to American Samoa Office of Archives and Records, and more. We have joined together in the Collective Wisdom LAM Conference Exchange project.

Description: We are a unique and diverse cohort of professionals from library, archives and museum (LAM) organizations. We represent a range of institutions, from the Smithsonian to Tulare County Library (CA) to American Samoa Office of Archives and Records, and more. We have joined together in the Collective Wisdom LAM Conference Exchange project. Our mission is to break through the barriers between libraries, archives and museums, and explore cross-sector culture, policies, and practices, especially related to the continuing education and professional development of our workforce. Find out what we’ve learned about getting out of our silos. Join this ongoing conversation to share your ideas and visions for creating a strong LAM network that delivers high-quality services to our communities.\

Presenter: Betha Gutsche

Format: Facilitated Discussion

Types of libraries: Academic, Association, Federal, Government, Information-related Organization, Museum, Nonprofit, Public, Research Library, Rural, Special, State Library

Subjects: Advocacy, Archives, Community Engagement, Continuing Education, Digitial Libraries, Information Commons, Leadership, Networking, Organizational Change, Partnerships, Professional Development, Resource Sharing, Special Collections, Transforming Libraries, Virtual Communities and Libraries

Additional comments: The Collective Wisdom LAM Conference Exchange cohort members will also attend major conferences in the museum sector (AAM in May) and archives sector (SAA in August). They are seeking opportunities to share their insights and activities at each conference. This Conversation Starter event would be an excellent venue for them to connect with other ALA attendees.

The Collective Wisdom cohort is sponsored by the Coalition to Advance Learning across Archives, Libraries and Museums (Coalition), which works in deliberate coordination across organizational boundaries to devise and strengthen sustainable continuing education and professional development programs that will transform the archives, library, and museum workforce in ways that lead to measurable impact on our nation’s communities. The Coalition is interested in increasing understanding of trends, issues, and opportunities, and raising the visibility of existing cross-sector CE/PD partnerships and collaboration. The Coalition is funded by IMLS and administered by OCLC.

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Suggestion We’re Getting Engaged! How Four Academic Libraries at Top Universities Made Meaningful Connections with Their Constituents

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Fri, Apr 1, 2016 at 02:40 pm
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Points: 12

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Description: In the years following the Great Recession, academic research libraries in higher education were faced with declining gate count, severe drops in funding and staffing, and a perception that academic research libraries were nearly obsolete. This talk shares the ways in which the directors of four academic research libraries at the top universities in one state found ways to meaningfully – and lastingly – connect to their constituents to get their campus community re-engaged, and regained the library’s role as the heart of their institutions.

Description: In the years following the Great Recession, academic research libraries in higher education were faced with declining gate count, severe drops in funding and staffing, and a perception that academic research libraries were nearly obsolete. This talk shares the ways in which the directors of four academic research libraries at the top universities in one state found ways to meaningfully – and lastingly – connect to their constituents to get their campus community re-engaged, and regained the library’s role as the heart of their institutions.

Presenter: Victoria Stuart

Format: Lecture

Types of libraries: Academic, Nonprofit, Public, Research Library, Student, Undergraduate

Subjects: Administration and Management, Community Engagement, Human Resources, Information Commons, Instruction, Learning Commons, Marketing, Organizational Change, Strategic Planning

Additional comments: This talk will present a brief look at the results of a multiple case study, conducted for a dissertation, which examined the changes to the academic libraries of four top-tier public comprehensive research universities in Florida during the past five years (2010-2015). It looks at those connections from four different perspectives: 1) Human Resources, 2) Political, 3) Structural, and 4) Symbolic.

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Voting for the Conversation Starter program proposals is open through April 20th. Selected proposals will be announced in early May.

--> In addition to browsing the list below, you can also sort the proposals by title or date and see which proposals have gotten the most votes so far.

These fast-paced, 45-minute sessions are intended to jumpstart conversations and highlight emerging topics and trends. Your votes will count for 30% of the total, while ALA staff votes will also count for 30%. The ALA Conference Committee will weigh in with 40% of the votes.

Learn about all of the exciting things happening at the 2016 ALA Annual Conference and register today!

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