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Vote for the 2015 ALA Annual Conversation Starters Community

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Discussion Voting is now Closed

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Wed, Apr 1, 2015 at 07:52 am

 

NOTE: Voting closed on March 31st. Watch the 2015 Annual Conference website for an announcement of the sessions that were selected!

 

--

Voting for the Conversation Starter program proposals is open through March 31st. Selected proposals will be announced in early April.

 

NOTE: Voting closed on March 31st. Watch the 2015 Annual Conference website for an announcement of the sessions that were selected!

 

--

Voting for the Conversation Starter program proposals is open through March 31st. Selected proposals will be announced in early April.

--> In addition to browsing the list below, you can also sort the proposals by title or date and see which proposals have gotten the most votes so far.

These fast-paced, 45-minute sessions are intended to jumpstart conversations and highlight emerging topics and trends. Your votes will count for 30% of the total, while ALA staff votes will also count for 30%. The ALA Conference Committee will weigh in with 40% of the votes.

Learn about all of the exciting things happening at the 2015 ALA Annual Conference and register today!

You can also vote for the 2015 ALA Annual Ignite proposals.

More...

Suggestion Social Curation for Libraries: An IMLS Prototype

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Fri, Sep 25, 2015 at 10:09 am
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Points: 10

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Description: The Buffalo & Erie County Public Library, Buffalo, NY, is pioneering a "social curation" process for building dynamic, multimedia and responsive digital library collections forged from Buffalo's rich ethnic and neighborhood community history. This IMLS National Leadership Grant project connects Library primary sources with digital technology and community participation as a platform for new programs, exhibits and digital outputs based in the physical and virtual space of  public libraries.

Description: The Buffalo & Erie County Public Library, Buffalo, NY, is pioneering a "social curation" process for building dynamic, multimedia and responsive digital library collections forged from Buffalo's rich ethnic and neighborhood community history. This IMLS National Leadership Grant project connects Library primary sources with digital technology and community participation as a platform for new programs, exhibits and digital outputs based in the physical and virtual space of  public libraries. This emerging project, its challenges and discovered opportunities is reshaping this Library's digital future and collections planning and offers ideas applicable to many libraries.  

Presenters

  • Anne Conable
  • Michael Frisch

Format: Panel Discussion

Types of libraries:

  • Academic
  • Urban
  • State Library
  • Regional System
  • Public
  • Nonprofit
  • Museum
  • Library School

Subjects:

  • Archives
  • Information Commons
  • Digitization
  • Digital Libraries
  • Community Engagement

Additional comments:

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Suggestion Should Graphic Novels Have Their Own Award?

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Tue, Mar 10, 2015 at 06:19 pm
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Points: 56

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Description: The panel will discuss the merits and concerns of creating a book award specifically for graphic literature. Featuring Printz Award-winning cartoonist Gene Luen Yang; Senior Librarian, Teen Services, Los Angeles Public Library Candice Mack; cartoonist and Kids’ Comics Revolution! co-founder Dave Roman; K-8 Media Specialist and Caldecott Committee member Laura Given; and Executive Director of the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund (CBLDF) Charles Brownstein.

Description: The panel will discuss the merits and concerns of creating a book award specifically for graphic literature. Featuring Printz Award-winning cartoonist Gene Luen Yang; Senior Librarian, Teen Services, Los Angeles Public Library Candice Mack; cartoonist and Kids’ Comics Revolution! co-founder Dave Roman; K-8 Media Specialist and Caldecott Committee member Laura Given; and Executive Director of the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund (CBLDF) Charles Brownstein. Panel moderated by K-8 Teacher-Librarian & Black Eyed Susan Graphic Novel committee member Rebecca Oxley.

Presenter: Rebecca Oxley

Format: Panel Discussion

Types of libraries:

  • Academic
  • Student
  • State Library
  • School / Media Center
  • Public
  • Middle School
  • Library School
  • High School
  • Elementary School
  • Association

Subjects:

  • Advocacy
  • Young Adult Literature
  • Diversity
  • Collection Development
  • Children's Literature

Additional comments: Topics will include the still-fluid definition of the format, the impact of graphic novels on American readership, criteria for excellence and guidelines for selection, which readers an award would be for, and what awards already exist for the graphic novel format. We’ll be asking some of the hard questions in one conversation: why isn’t there already an award for graphic novels, and, is a separate award for the graphic novel format really needed? Get ready for a diverse array of perspectives.

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Suggestion ...And Social Justice for All: How Can Librarians and Social Workers Collaborate?

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Fri, Mar 20, 2015 at 10:01 am
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Points: 45

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Description: Here in the nation's first city to hire a full-time social worker for its central public library, you'll hear a lot about serving our least advantaged patrons. But we and our social work colleagues have a shared history of commitment to social justice as well as much to learn from each other in theory and practice. Does your library system connect directly with social services? How do you make social justice part of your daily work?

Description: Here in the nation's first city to hire a full-time social worker for its central public library, you'll hear a lot about serving our least advantaged patrons. But we and our social work colleagues have a shared history of commitment to social justice as well as much to learn from each other in theory and practice. Does your library system connect directly with social services? How do you make social justice part of your daily work? Bring learnings from your work life and from conference sessions to this open conversation with a public librarian and social worker.

Presenters

  • Mary Nienow
  • Sara Zettervall

Format: Facilitated Discussion

Types of libraries:

  • Joint Use
  • Urban
  • Student
  • School / Media Center
  • Regional System
  • Public
  • Prison Library
  • Native

Subjects:

  • Community Engagement
  • Social Change
  • Partnerships
  • Ethics
  • Diversity

Additional comments:

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Suggestion Holy Moly, 100 Adults Came?!? WTF?

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Mar 12, 2015 at 10:02 am
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Points: 62

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Description: Are you tired of spending hours preparing for a program when only 10 people show up? So were we. Sunnyvale librarians discovered the secret of attracting large crowds by using marketing tools and choosing timely topics. With personal interests as sources of inspiration, we created innovative programs on such topics as starting a vegetable garden,  adults-only crafting, showcasing electric vehicles, using the 3D printer, and more.

Description: Are you tired of spending hours preparing for a program when only 10 people show up? So were we. Sunnyvale librarians discovered the secret of attracting large crowds by using marketing tools and choosing timely topics. With personal interests as sources of inspiration, we created innovative programs on such topics as starting a vegetable garden,  adults-only crafting, showcasing electric vehicles, using the 3D printer, and more. Learn steps for success, participate in a brainstorming session, and walk away with a practical toolkit to help you take your adult programs to the next level.

Presenters:

  • Rachel Collier
  • Liz Hickok
  • Wendy Silver

Format: Lecture

Types of libraries:

  • Academic
  • Public
  • Nonprofit
  • Museum
  • Library School
  • Community College

Subjects:

  • Adult Services
  • Public Programs
  • Popular Culture
  • Partnerships
  • Networking

Additional comments:

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Suggestion Platypus: Non-Traditional Libraries Making Connections to Children, Literacy, Non-fiction, and the Arts

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Mon, Mar 9, 2015 at 06:24 pm
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Points: 14

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Description: Just as the platypus defies traditional mammalian classification, so too do our libraries. Join professional educators and librarians from the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Watson and Nolen Libraries, New York University’s Constantine Georgiou Library and Resource Center for Children, and Princeton University’s Cotsen Children’s Rare Books and Special Collections Library to learn more about our children’s programs.

Description: Just as the platypus defies traditional mammalian classification, so too do our libraries. Join professional educators and librarians from the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Watson and Nolen Libraries, New York University’s Constantine Georgiou Library and Resource Center for Children, and Princeton University’s Cotsen Children’s Rare Books and Special Collections Library to learn more about our children’s programs. These dynamic programs introduce picture books as tools for developing visual literacy and art appreciation, foster emergent literacy skills, and teach non-fiction subjects using special collections. Learn tips for adopting best practices in your library programs and bring your voice to the Q&A.

Presenter

  • Dana Sheridan
  • Kendra Tyson
  • Leah High

Format: Panel Discussion

Types of libraries:

  • Academic
  • Student
  • Special
  • Research Library
  • Other
  • Nonprofit
  • Museum
  • Library School
  • Elementary School

Subjects:

  • Children's Literature
  • Special Collections
  • Public Programs
  • Literacy
  • Children's Services

Additional comments:

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Suggestion Programming Platforms: Your Programs are part of the Collection!

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Mon, Mar 9, 2015 at 06:14 pm
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Points: 25

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Description: Join members of the Programming Librarians' Interest Group for an exciting look at how to approach programming with your collection development skills by building Programming Platforms.

Description: Join members of the Programming Librarians' Interest Group for an exciting look at how to approach programming with your collection development skills by building Programming Platforms. Learn about the philosophy behind this approach and see successful examples from programming librarians Janie Hermann of Princeton Public Library, Erinn Paige of New Canaan Library, and Mallory Arents of Darien Library, who will share practical, scalable examples of programming suites that bring in big numbers, promote the library's resources, and reach even the most elusive patrons.

Presenters

  • Mallory Arents
  • Janie Hermann
  • Erinn Paige

Format: Panel Discussion

Types of libraries: Public

Subjects:

  • Adult Services
  • Public Programs
  • Partnerships
  • Marketing
  • Literacy
  • Librarianship
  • Community Engagement
  • Collection Development

Additional comments: Supported by the Programming Librarian's Interest Group.

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Suggestion The Library-Museum Connection

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Mon, Mar 9, 2015 at 06:12 pm
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Points: 39

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Description: Join Librarians Rebecca Hopman of the The Rakow Research Library at the Corning Museum of Glass, Kara West of the San Diego Public Library, and Erinn Paige of New Canaan Library for an exciting look at how each of these places—a research library, a large urban library, and a small municipal library—are working to bridge the gap between museum and library service to support the creative life of their communities.

Presenter

Description: Join Librarians Rebecca Hopman of the The Rakow Research Library at the Corning Museum of Glass, Kara West of the San Diego Public Library, and Erinn Paige of New Canaan Library for an exciting look at how each of these places—a research library, a large urban library, and a small municipal library—are working to bridge the gap between museum and library service to support the creative life of their communities.

Presenter

  • Rebecca Hopman
  • Kara West
  • Erinn Paige

Format: Panel Discussion

Types of libraries:

  • Academic
  • Research Library
  • Public
  • Museum

Subjects:

  • Adult Services
  • Trends and Forecasting
  • Special Collections
  • Public Programs
  • Outreach Services
  • Librarianship
  • Archives

Additional comments: Supported by the Library as Incubator Project / IArtLibraries Network

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Suggestion Training teens for real-world work: How library internships and volunteer opportunities provide lifelong skills

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Fri, Mar 6, 2015 at 12:12 pm
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Points: 36

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Description: Libraries in San Diego are bridging the gap between school and the professional world by providing opportunities for teens to practice workplace skills and give back to the community. Three libraries—The Preuss School University of California, San Diego (UCSD,) San Diego County Library (SDCL,) and San Diego Public Library (SDPL)— will be discussing teen volunteer and internship programs at their respective locations.

Description: Libraries in San Diego are bridging the gap between school and the professional world by providing opportunities for teens to practice workplace skills and give back to the community. Three libraries—The Preuss School University of California, San Diego (UCSD,) San Diego County Library (SDCL,) and San Diego Public Library (SDPL)— will be discussing teen volunteer and internship programs at their respective locations. An overview of their programs, best practices, lessons learned, and outcomes, will be shared to inspire other libraries wishing to start their own internship and volunteer programs.

Presenter

  • Angelica Fortin
  • Maria Gonzalez
  • Monnee Tong

Format: Panel Discussion

Types of libraries:

  • High School
  • Urban
  • School / Media Center
  • Public
  • Middle School

Subjects:

  • Mentoring
  • Young Adult Services
  • Urban Libraries
  • Technology
  • Partnerships

Additional comments

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Suggestion What We Didn't Learn in Library School

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Fri, Mar 6, 2015 at 12:07 pm
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Points: 46

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Description: After years of hard work, you left school with the glorious MLIS degree. How does the MLIS educational experience stack up in the real world? Four early career librarians from varying perspectives will offer what they have needed to learn beyond the degree. Join us to discover some of what you weren't taught, but may need to know to survive in the field of librarianship. Topics may include: programming realities, budgets, coworker relations, librarian as a brand, librarian as a solo act, children in the library, and more!

Presenter

Description: After years of hard work, you left school with the glorious MLIS degree. How does the MLIS educational experience stack up in the real world? Four early career librarians from varying perspectives will offer what they have needed to learn beyond the degree. Join us to discover some of what you weren't taught, but may need to know to survive in the field of librarianship. Topics may include: programming realities, budgets, coworker relations, librarian as a brand, librarian as a solo act, children in the library, and more!

Presenter

  • Kapena Shim
  • Christina Shin
  • Debby Vandersande
  • Amy Steinbauer

Format: Panel Discussion

Types of libraries:

  • Library School
  • Seeking employment
  • Other

Subjects:

  • Career Advice
  • New ALA Members
  • Library School Education
  • Librarianship
  • Foundations

Additional comments: We are enthusiastic about sharing our experiences to be a resource for new librarians or those still getting their library degree! Our conversation starter will help struggling peers, and will be an entertaining space to share with others!

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NOTE: Voting closed on March 31st. Watch the 2015 Annual Conference website for an announcement of the sessions that were selected!

--

Voting for the Conversation Starter program proposals is open through March 31st. Selected proposals will be announced in early April.

--> In addition to browsing the list below, you can also sort the proposals by title or date and see which proposals have gotten the most votes so far.

These fast-paced, 45-minute sessions are intended to jumpstart conversations and highlight emerging topics and trends. Your votes will count for 30% of the total, while ALA staff votes will also count for 30%. The ALA Conference Committee will weigh in with 40% of the votes.

Learn about all of the exciting things happening at the 2015 ALA Annual Conference and register today!

You can also vote for the 2015 ALA Annual Ignite proposals.

Subscribe to Vote for the 2015 ALA Annual Conversation Starters