Vote for the 2012 ALA Annual Conversation Starters [Community] Archived

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Hacking Library School

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Mon, Feb 27, 2012 at 01:20 pm

Description: The Hack Library School Blog is for, by, and about library school students. Our guiding philosophy is based on the principle of crowd-sourcing information. We seek to create a collaborative environment where other library school students can come together and share information with one another to enrich their education. We hope to bring the virtual discussion to ALA and get people talking.

This conversation starter seeks to bring together students and professionals to talk about issues pertaining to our education and our field. It will be a moderated conversation with guiding questions such as: what aspects of library school curriculum prepare you for the job? What emerging technologies enrich your education? How do you “hack” library school? Hack Library School is about being the change that you want to see. What would you change?

Library school students, new and seasoned professionals are welcome and encouraged to attend and share information.

Description: The Hack Library School Blog is for, by, and about library school students. Our guiding philosophy is based on the principle of crowd-sourcing information. We seek to create a collaborative environment where other library school students can come together and share information with one another to enrich their education. We hope to bring the virtual discussion to ALA and get people talking.

This conversation starter seeks to bring together students and professionals to talk about issues pertaining to our education and our field. It will be a moderated conversation with guiding questions such as: what aspects of library school curriculum prepare you for the job? What emerging technologies enrich your education? How do you “hack” library school? Hack Library School is about being the change that you want to see. What would you change?

Library school students, new and seasoned professionals are welcome and encouraged to attend and share information.

Presenter(s): Annie Pho, Co-managing Editor of Hack Library School Blog and Reference and Instruction Librarian, Ivy Tech Community College

Format: Facilitated discussion

Target audience: Library Information Science Students and New Professionals.

Types of libraries:

  • Academic
  • Library School
  • Public
  • Seeking Employment
  • Special
  • Student

Subjects

  • Library School Education
  • New ALA Members
  • Partnerships
  • Professional Development
  • Social Media & Networks

Additional comments: Although, we have had HLS Social Gatherings for ALA conferences, this would be our first conference facilitated discussion.

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Shining the Light on Departmental Divisions: Creating Solutions

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Mon, Feb 27, 2012 at 01:07 pm

Description: Technical services and public services personnel bring very different philosophies, experiences and needs to the development table. What are these differences and how can collaborative working groups bring balance to the often seemingly disparate issues when creating and implementing new technologies that benefit the user? Why do we feel the need to identify with one or the other, apart from administrative hierarchy? How does this division potentially affect our ability to communicate and collaborate within the library? Is it an asset or a roadblock to innovation?

For example, one side-effect of tightened travel budgets is that librarians and staff are much more selective about which conferences they attend. With the stakes of tenure and/or promotion high, one tends to gravitate toward conferences most similar to one’s own field, limiting the chances for “cross-pollination” of ideas and ideology.

This facilitated discussion will give participants a chance to voice concerns and potentially work out solutions in a non-confrontational atmosphere. No “us” versus “them” allowed here. Staff, faculty, and administrators are all welcome.

Description: Technical services and public services personnel bring very different philosophies, experiences and needs to the development table. What are these differences and how can collaborative working groups bring balance to the often seemingly disparate issues when creating and implementing new technologies that benefit the user? Why do we feel the need to identify with one or the other, apart from administrative hierarchy? How does this division potentially affect our ability to communicate and collaborate within the library? Is it an asset or a roadblock to innovation?

For example, one side-effect of tightened travel budgets is that librarians and staff are much more selective about which conferences they attend. With the stakes of tenure and/or promotion high, one tends to gravitate toward conferences most similar to one’s own field, limiting the chances for “cross-pollination” of ideas and ideology.

This facilitated discussion will give participants a chance to voice concerns and potentially work out solutions in a non-confrontational atmosphere. No “us” versus “them” allowed here. Staff, faculty, and administrators are all welcome.

Presenter(s): Marliese Thomas, User Engagement Librarian, Samford University Library

Format: Facilitated discussion

Target audience: Administrators, academic librarians, early professionals, technical staff, all librarians

Types of libraries:

  • Academic
  • Community College
  • Medical
  • Public
  • Research Library
  • State Library
  • Undergraduate

Subjects

  • Administration and Management
  • Leadership
  • Mentoring
  • Organizational Change
  • Personnel and Staffing

Additional comments: While I am submitting this proposal as a facilitated discussion, I am open to turning it into a panel, if there is sufficient interest from another group to co-sponsor. However, the focus should be on a collaborative approach to sharing information and ideas, not lecture-style or case study presentations.

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Working with Flamethrowers: How to Fuel Innovative Outreach in Academic Libraries

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Tue, Mar 6, 2012 at 12:52 pm

Description: Why does outreach matter in academic libraries? And what exactly is it (advertising, PR, instruction, book clubs)? This panel discussion will examine why outreach should be a part of every academic library's mission, how to think about it, and ways to actively engage users through outreach efforts. The panel will share innovative outreach efforts the speakers have done at their institutions ranging from the graphic novel "Library of the Living Dead" guide to hosting a first-year student Information Carnival. This discussion will offer ways to think about outreach for your specific institution and provide ideas to try yourself. This panel will focus in particular on ways to engage students through outreach activities.

Description: Why does outreach matter in academic libraries? And what exactly is it (advertising, PR, instruction, book clubs)? This panel discussion will examine why outreach should be a part of every academic library's mission, how to think about it, and ways to actively engage users through outreach efforts. The panel will share innovative outreach efforts the speakers have done at their institutions ranging from the graphic novel "Library of the Living Dead" guide to hosting a first-year student Information Carnival. This discussion will offer ways to think about outreach for your specific institution and provide ideas to try yourself. This panel will focus in particular on ways to engage students through outreach activities.

Presenter(s): Lizz Zitron, Outreach Librarian, Carthage College, Kenosha, WI; Rudy Leon, Reference & Instruction Librarian, University of Nevada, Reno; Matt Upson, Director, Kansas MLS Program, Emporia School of Library and Information Management, Emporia State University, Emporia, KS

Format: Panel discussion

Target audience: Academic libraries, but public and special libraries would benefit from our discussion, too

Types of libraries:

  • Academic
  • High School
  • Public
  • Student
  • Undergraduate

Subjects

  • Outreach Services
  • Public Relations

Additional comments: We aim to both explore philosophies behind outreach and provide practical application.

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Master Class: Living Longer, Stronger and Happier

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Mon, Feb 27, 2012 at 01:01 pm

Description: Road Scholar Senior Vice President Peter Spiers has authored a new book set for publication in June 2012 entitled Master Class: Living Longer, Stronger, and Happier. Master Class reverse engineers the lifestyle of some of the most hale and hearty older people in the world, the participants in Road Scholar’s educational travel programs, and lays out a holistic program, targeted at people on the cusp of retirement, for a life of engagement, enrichment, and fulfillment.

Master Class identifies 25-30 core activities—from volunteering and joining Lifelong Learning Institutes to gardening and educational travel—to which Masters are drawn, and explains why their blend of socializing, moving, creating, and thinking are a recipe for both successful aging and cognitive health. Master Class carefully integrates the latest in academic and internal Elderhostel research, but it’s the testimony of the Masters themselves that makes the most compelling case for the lifestyle, and which will motivate readers to get on the road to becoming Masters themselves.

Description: Road Scholar Senior Vice President Peter Spiers has authored a new book set for publication in June 2012 entitled Master Class: Living Longer, Stronger, and Happier. Master Class reverse engineers the lifestyle of some of the most hale and hearty older people in the world, the participants in Road Scholar’s educational travel programs, and lays out a holistic program, targeted at people on the cusp of retirement, for a life of engagement, enrichment, and fulfillment.

Master Class identifies 25-30 core activities—from volunteering and joining Lifelong Learning Institutes to gardening and educational travel—to which Masters are drawn, and explains why their blend of socializing, moving, creating, and thinking are a recipe for both successful aging and cognitive health. Master Class carefully integrates the latest in academic and internal Elderhostel research, but it’s the testimony of the Masters themselves that makes the most compelling case for the lifestyle, and which will motivate readers to get on the road to becoming Masters themselves.

In his presentation, Mr. Spiers will illustrate what healthy aging looks like based on new academic research, focus groups and personal interviews.

Presenter(s): Peter Spiers is the Senior Vice President of Strategic Outreach for Road Scholar. Prior to joining Road Scholar, he held several leadership positions in the publishing industry. He holds a bachelor's degree from Harvard Univeristy, an MBA from the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College and a master of science from the London School of Economics and Political Science.

Format: Lecture

Target audience: Educators, including librarians, college professors and administrators.

Types of libraries:

  • Academic
  • Association
  • Government
  • Museum
  • Nonprofit
  • Public
  • Research Library

Subjects

  • Continuing Education
  • Personnel and Staffing
  • Social Change
  • Strategic Planning
  • Trends and Forecasting

Additional comments: Road Scholar is a not-for-profit organization with a mission to inspire adults to learn, discover and travel. Our learning adventures engage expert instructors, provide extraordinary access, and stimulate discourse and friendship among people for whom learning is the journey of a lifetime. Since its inception, more than 5 million people have enrolled in its more than 6,500 iconic educational adventures offered annually in 50 states and 150 countries around the world. Road Scholar educational adventures are created by Elderhostel, Inc., the world leader in lifelong learning since 1975.

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Turning the Lights on Teen Literature

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Mon, Feb 27, 2012 at 01:08 pm

Description: This summer, Meghan Cox Gurdon's article "Darkness Too Visible?" caused a big stir among librarians, teachers, readers, and parents. Come and share what you think- Is recent teen fiction too "dark?" What can books about violence, evil, and abuse offer teens? How do you deal with parents who are concerned? How do these themes and subjects reflect teens' needs and desires? Let's continue the debate that Gurdon started online with a rousing conversation face to face.

Description: This summer, Meghan Cox Gurdon's article "Darkness Too Visible?" caused a big stir among librarians, teachers, readers, and parents. Come and share what you think- Is recent teen fiction too "dark?" What can books about violence, evil, and abuse offer teens? How do you deal with parents who are concerned? How do these themes and subjects reflect teens' needs and desires? Let's continue the debate that Gurdon started online with a rousing conversation face to face.

Presenter(s): Erin Reilly-Sanders, PhD Student and Graduate Teaching Associate, The Ohio State University

Format: Facilitated discussion

Target audience: Primarily teen services staff but also collections development, parents, and readers of teen fiction

Types of libraries:

  • High School
  • Middle School
  • Prison Library
  • Public
  • Regional System
  • School/Media Center
  • Urban

Subjects

  • Popular Culture
  • Readers' Advisory
  • Trends and Forecasting
  • Young Adult Literature
  • Young Adult Services

Additional comments: I have recently concluded a research project with Michele Castleman of Southeastern Louisiana University on teen protagonists who kill. Surprisingly, we found that the messages in these books were advocating for the value of life rather than promoting violence and that they reflected a new ideology of childhood where kids no longer needed to be protected or warned against dangers but had access to more information as well as the maturity to handle this information. Since so many people spoke out in support of or against Gurdon's article online, I'd like to continue the conversation as well as investigate how recent trends in teen fiction and in ideology of childhood will affect libraries.

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Library Instruction 2020 : Refocusing Today, Reshaping Tomorrow

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Wed, Mar 7, 2012 at 09:24 am

Description: Emerging technologies, patron-driven initiatives, on-demand services and tech savvy users are challenging libraries to employ different service models and library instruction is no exception. Library instruction continues to be a valuable service. However, instruction methods must actively engage users while satisfying learning outcomes. This conversation starter will jump start an important discussion on library instruction in the next generation. What skills and competencies should professionals focus on today to provide relevant, timely and engaging library instruction tomorrow? Who are our prospective partners in reshaping library instruction? More importantly, what will users expect from library instruction in 2020, and how do we prepare today to meet these challenges?

Description: Emerging technologies, patron-driven initiatives, on-demand services and tech savvy users are challenging libraries to employ different service models and library instruction is no exception. Library instruction continues to be a valuable service. However, instruction methods must actively engage users while satisfying learning outcomes. This conversation starter will jump start an important discussion on library instruction in the next generation. What skills and competencies should professionals focus on today to provide relevant, timely and engaging library instruction tomorrow? Who are our prospective partners in reshaping library instruction? More importantly, what will users expect from library instruction in 2020, and how do we prepare today to meet these challenges?

Presenter(s): LaVentra E. Danquah, Medical Librarian Coordinator, Education Services, Liaison Services, Shiffman Medical Library, Wayne State University

Format: Facilitated discussion

Target audience: Librarians and information professionals who provide and or coordinator library instruction in any type of library setting.

Types of libraries:

  • Academic
  • Community College
  • Corporate
  • Elementary School
  • High School
  • Law
  • Library School
  • Medical
  • Middle School
  • Public
  • Research Library
  • Rural
  • School/Media Center
  • Special
  • Student
  • Tribal
  • Undergraduate
  • Urban

Subjects

  • Instruction
  • Librarianship
  • Technology
  • Training
  • Trends and Forecasting

Additional comments: The conversation starter will discuss how and why professionals should prepare and plan for library instruction in the next generation.

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Integrating Human Rights and Genocide Prevention into Library Public Program

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Wed, Mar 7, 2012 at 09:12 am

Description: Thirty three years after the fall of Democratic Kampuchea, Cambodia is still coping with the painful legacies of genocide. More than 2 million innocent Cambodian citizens were murdered by its own country during the Khmer Rouge regime from 1975 to 1979. This program will examine the rise and fall of the Khmer Rouge regime, how to redress and heal the damage done by genocide, and how to help prevent genocide from occurring today. Recommended books and primary resource materials will be discussed.

Description: Thirty three years after the fall of Democratic Kampuchea, Cambodia is still coping with the painful legacies of genocide. More than 2 million innocent Cambodian citizens were murdered by its own country during the Khmer Rouge regime from 1975 to 1979. This program will examine the rise and fall of the Khmer Rouge regime, how to redress and heal the damage done by genocide, and how to help prevent genocide from occurring today. Recommended books and primary resource materials will be discussed.

Presenter(s): Icy Smith, Author of Half Spoon of Rice. Half Spoon of Rice presents a child’s account of life in Cambodia during the genocidal Khmer Rouge regime in the mid-1970s. Half Spoon of Rice is the winners of the Benjamin Franklin Book Award, Society of School Librarians International Honor Book Award, Cooperative Children’s Book Center Choices, Skipping Stones Honor Award, California Book Award Finalist Moonbeam Children’s Book Award and the Next Generation Indie Book Award Finalist.

Format: Lecture; PowerPoint presentation on the Cambodian genocide using archival photographs to examine and discuss a deeper understanding of the topic.

Target audience: All librarians and general audience at all instructional levels

Types of libraries:

  • Community College
  • High School
  • Middle School
  • Public
  • State Library
  • Student

Subjects

  • Adult Services
  • Diversity
  • International Issues
  • Multicultural Services
  • Public Programs

Additional comments

Objectives:

  1. Participants will have increased knowledge of the tragic events of the Cambodian genocide.
  2. Participants will learn how to utilize an illustrated storybook to teach a lesson on human rights and genocide.
  3. Participants will learn how the International Tribunal provides for justice, and how to redress and heal the damage done by genocide.
  4. Participants will have increased competence to advance students’ awareness of human rights and the global community.

Speaking References:

  1. National Council for Social Studies Conference
  2. National Association for Asian and Pacific American Education Conference
  3. California Teachers Association Equity and Human Rights Conference
  4. California Teachers Association Good Teaching Conference
  5. California Association for the Gifted Conference
  6. California School Library Association Annual Conference
  7. California Council for Social Studies Conference
  8. Los Angeles County Multicultural Conference
  9. Texas Library Association Convention
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Publishers/Libraries & Ebooks

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Tue, Mar 6, 2012 at 08:43 pm

Description: Libraries working directly with Publishers to form an ebook acquisition model that benefits both libraries and publishers.

Description: Libraries working directly with Publishers to form an ebook acquisition model that benefits both libraries and publishers.

Presenter(s): Lisa Hickman, Dzanc Books

Format: Facilitated discussion

Target audience: Libraries/Publishers/Acquisitions Directors/Procurement Directors

Types of libraries:

  • Academic
  • Community College
  • Consortium
  • High School
  • Nonprofit
  • Public
  • State Library
  • Urban

Subjects

  • Acquisitions
  • Digital Libraries
  • Ebooks
  • Partnerships
  • Social Change

Additional comments: We are seeing the reading industry change right before our eyes with many readers going to ereaders.  We are partnering with libraries to work directly with them to facilitate more efficient ebook acquisitions...this is a major change in the industry.

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Convincing the Naysayers – Why Graphic Novels Deserve a Legitimate Place on Your Library Shelves

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Tue, Mar 6, 2012 at 02:11 pm

Description: Do you still need to convince others of the value of using graphic novels in your libraries and schools?  If so, this session will provide you with research, circulation data, and strategies for justifying the use of graphic novels with patrons and students.  A panel of graphic novel gurus will provide the ammunition you need to convince others of the validity of having graphic novels in your collections.

Description: Do you still need to convince others of the value of using graphic novels in your libraries and schools?  If so, this session will provide you with research, circulation data, and strategies for justifying the use of graphic novels with patrons and students.  A panel of graphic novel gurus will provide the ammunition you need to convince others of the validity of having graphic novels in your collections.

Presenter(s): Robin Brenner, Young Adult Librarian, Brookline Public Library, MA; Karen Gavigan, Assistant Professor, School of Library and Information Science, University of South Carolina; Kat Kan, School Librarian, St. John's Catholic School, Panama City, FL; Robin Moeller, Assistant Professor, School of Library Science, Leadership and Educational Studies, Appalachian State University; John Shableski, President of 4ColorPerspective, Consultant, Wildcat Comic Con; Josh Elder, Founder and President, Reading with Pictures

Format: Panel discussion

Target audience: School librarians and school library directors; Children's and YA Services librarians and public library directors; University Professors who teach children's and young adult literature

Types of libraries:

  • Academic
  • Elementary School
  • High School
  • Library School
  • Middle School
  • Prison Library
  • Public
  • Regional System
  • Rural
  • School/Media Center
  • State Library
  • Undergraduate
  • Urban

Subjects

  • Children's Literature
  • Children's Services
  • Collection Development
  • Young Adult Literature
  • Young Adult Services

Additional comments: We will provide attendees with lists of recommended resources.

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Librarians and Journalists: Maintaining Relevancy and Preserving History Through Collaboration

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Tue, Mar 6, 2012 at 12:56 pm

Description: Librarians and journalists can work together more effectively to contribute and create value added content to our community. Both thrive on the same mission of providing information to the masses, as well as preserving the history of their communities. This can be done by showing our communities how to make and preserve their own news, build and create community histories and provide access to information in a timely fashion without compromising integrity and validity of the content important to communities at hand.

Description: Librarians and journalists can work together more effectively to contribute and create value added content to our community. Both thrive on the same mission of providing information to the masses, as well as preserving the history of their communities. This can be done by showing our communities how to make and preserve their own news, build and create community histories and provide access to information in a timely fashion without compromising integrity and validity of the content important to communities at hand.

Presenter(s): Moderator: Tinamarie Vella, Access Services Manager/Librarian (CUNY Graduate School of Journalism); Speakers: Amy Buckland, eScholarship, ePublishing & Digitization Coordinator (McGill University) and Marsha Iverson, Public Relations Specialist (King County Library System)

Format: Facilitated discussion

Target audience: Information specialists, librarians, journalists, media organizations, anyone interested in community building and information seeking.

Types of libraries:

  • All types of libraries

Subjects

  • Civic Engagement
  • Equity of Access
  • Preservation
  • Transforming Libraries
  • Virtual Communities and Libraries

Additional comments: This topic is an important one, a similar session will be done at SXSWi: http://lanyrd.com/2012/sxsw-interactive/spmyh/ . We've added the concept of collaboration among librarians and journalists to make changes for the greater good for the community.

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Voting for the Conversation Starter program proposals has closed. Any new votes added will not be counted towards a proposal's total. We'll notify authors of the selected proposals and announce them here in early April.

 

--> In addition to browsing the list below, you can also sort the proposals by title or date.

 

These fast-paced, 45-minute sessions are intended to jumpstart conversations and highlight emerging topics and trends. Your votes will count for 30% of the total, while ALA staff votes will also count for 30%. The ALA Conference Committee will weigh in with 40% of the votes.

 

Learn about all of the exciting things happening at the 2012 ALA Annual Conference and register today! You can also vew the 2012 Annual Ignite proposals, too.

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