ACRL STS (Science and Technology Section) Section

Closed group
In: ACRL STS (Science and Technology Section), Academic Libraries, Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) -- Sections, Collection Development
1160 members  |  About this group  |   Syndicate content
View:   Faces | List

Online Doc STS Unconference Notes: ALA Annual 2014

by Kathy Szigeti on Wed, Jul 16, 2014 at 09:32 am

Thanks so much to Spencer Davis for following our conversation and writing up the notes for us. We appreciate your work!
(Kathy Szigeti, facilitator)

 

 Introduction

The session flowed as a free flowing conversation with individuals asking questions that were relevant to them and then the rest of the group answered. These are an extrapolation of my notes and the recollections I have.

Thanks so much to Spencer Davis for following our conversation and writing up the notes for us. We appreciate your work!
(Kathy Szigeti, facilitator)

 

 Introduction

The session flowed as a free flowing conversation with individuals asking questions that were relevant to them and then the rest of the group answered. These are an extrapolation of my notes and the recollections I have.

 

 Topic 1 – Space in the Library

 Question:

 How does one justify getting new space in the library verses what fit on the shelves and what is appropriate? Also they need to make the case that they are a library and need advice on what to do and how to explain this to administration and others?

Responses:

 The amount of dollars that are paid into the collection wind up being a sizable investment. Those are concrete numbers that administrators and staff can see. Showing them where that money is going, into materials that then get weeded or outdated may show staff what they need.

 Another way of phrasing the information.

            If one considers information like food then one knows that food has a 'best buy' date on it. After a certain point it just goes bad.

 One person spoke about the Renovation of the Carnegie Mellon libraries which wound up being not to the pleasure of the Dean and President. A potential solution on what to do with/in the Library can asked by the librarians: what do you want to do in the library space? Should there be more study rooms, more books, classrooms, computers? All people need to communicate what they want, what they would like to see done, and know that the others have heard them and are on the same page.

Another way of phrasing the information. Comic between waiter and guest with the guest complaining about the meat.

            “What do you mean you ordered the prime rib, I wanted beef.”

            “It is beef.”

            “I want something thick and juicy, something I can bite into. Don't give me that fancy stuff give me meat.”

            “Yes sir.”

Off-site storage of materials is another option. It removes the materials from the physical space but still leaves them accessible.

 

Topic 2 – Impact of Research and how librarians affect it?

Question:

 How do librarians impact on research, researchers?

Responses:

 There is a discrepancy between what can be measured and what is valuable. Numbers that can be measured give only certain bits of data. Gate counts, circulation of books, number of questions at the desk only show that the library and resources have been used but do not give a greater meaning to the impact of the library upon research. Obtaining that kind of information, of a meaning impact is very difficult or impossible to obtain.

Ideally we'd like to say that because the library was open X researcher looked up information on Y to make conclusion Z. Thus we can show an immediate impact on the research thus reaffirming in everyone's mind that the library has a needed and meaningful existence. How does one create such a situation in real life when research goes on for years, over the course of multiple institutions and perhaps thousands of information sources?

 Numerics have an immediate application in circulation and can help determine what materials are used, not used, and are no longer needed. A question came up about keeping older texts which are obviously out of date but have historical value. The reason to keep them would be for the historical contrast and so that individuals have the ability to go back and say 'Oh, this what people thought about this subject back when dinosaurs roamed the Earth.' Removing the older texts frees up space but also limits the information that people can find, especially if it is the last copy of an out-of-print item. The Florida Academic Repository allows for digital copies of said items to be deposited there, but that is only a local chapter. If their hardware fails or the data is lost, poof. All gone. What is needed is a central warehouse of information whose job is collect and store for posterity a copy of every material ever printed. No editing of information, just storage and retrieval.

 

Topic 3 – Library verses Librarians

 Then there was the question of the librarian. What value do they add? They are the subject expert and the person everyone goes to if there is an issue. People revere the library, it helps the schools, the community, allows for this and that and blah blah blah. Everyone likes to talk about how great and wonderful the library is but not willing to shell out money to support it even though they just exclaimed its virtues. One slight problem. A library itself does not do much. A library, books, databases are all tools and cannot assist a community by itself. The staff and librarians who run the library make those tools available and accessible.

Some folks even commented that the American Library Association should change its name to the American Librarian Association.

 Topic 4 – Embedded Librarianship

Question:

How to get invited to staff meetings and show faculty you can help?

 Responses:

One way one individual got access to staff meetings was through a new dean at their school. It created the opportunity for new ideas to be exchanged. One idea was to ask to be invited to the monthly staff meetings. Issues are that one needs a new dean and typically one doesn't want to wait that long.

 Another way was to assist one individual, help them and show them how beneficial the library and the library staff can be thus creating an advocate to help promote the promise of the library. This works so long as the individual is there and/or willing to think of the library as an asset. Once they go, well then you're back to square one.

 Having office hours in the department has both pros and cons. The pros are that if one is located at a key point, aka in a high traffic area, then people start to recognize the staff there. People can identify you as 'hey, you’re the subject librarian!' which is all well and good but how does one rate relationships with faculty and students in library metrics? Is there any way to measure that and what does it mean? The librarians are also there, easily accessible to the faculty and students when they need them. The cons are that it really depends on where the individual from the library is located. If you're not in a high traffic area, just shoved into a corner someplace where nobody will see you, then it may not work out.

 

Topic 5 – Professional Development

 Question:

What do people do to continue to gain skills and such?

 Responses:

 The ALA immediately came up as well as local chapters. SLA, science boot camps, virtual conferences  such as Library 2.014, MOOCs, and webinars.

 

Topic 6 – Data Management

 Question:

How does one get faculty to use the library, or librarians, as a tool to help facilitate their research. After all, they are the experts on the subject.

 Responses:

Each person will need to adjust to their needs and circumstances accordingly, but in general the response went along this line. Ask the faculty about their research and get them to tell you all about it. Assuming they are interested they should be more than willing to discuss it with you. This will be the hard part, you'll need to listen to them. Listen and wait and be patient until you know enough about what they do to say 'okay, here's how I can help.' Find out what their needs are, as researchers what do they require because they can't be an expert in all subjects!

 

 

 

More...

Event Council I (ACRL STS)

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Fri, Jun 20, 2014 at 07:37 pm

This is the first business meeting of the conference for the Science & Technology Section of ACRL. Co-chair representation of all section committees, discussion groups and task forces is expected. Visitors are welcome.

More information about this conference session

Event All-Committees Meeting (ACRL STS)

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Fri, Jun 20, 2014 at 07:37 pm

These are open committee meetings for the section. Please visit if you're interested in eventually joining a committee.

More information about this conference session

Event Council II (ACRL STS)

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Fri, Jun 20, 2014 at 07:37 pm

This is the final business meeting of the conference for the Science & Technology Section of ACRL. Co-chair representation of all section committees, discussion groups and task forces is expected. Visitors are welcome.

More information about this conference session

Event General Membership Meeting & Breakfast (ACRL STS)

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Fri, Jun 20, 2014 at 07:37 pm

This is a general business meeting of the section including the welcoming of new members/first time conference attendees.

More information about this conference session

Discussion Get ready to discuss STEM retention at ALA Conference

by Erin OToole on Tue, May 27, 2014 at 01:17 pm

Are you interested in how you can contribute to the retention of science and engineering students at your institution? The Science Retention Librarian blog explores news, blogs, and education and library and information science literature for potential strategies to support STEM students with library collections and services.

Are you interested in how you can contribute to the retention of science and engineering students at your institution? The Science Retention Librarian blog explores news, blogs, and education and library and information science literature for potential strategies to support STEM students with library collections and services. Recent posts are “Science through Storytelling?” and “Huffington Post Supports Girls in STEM.” Join blogger Erin O’Toole from the University of North Texas and add your ideas to the STEM retention dialogue.

The blog is related to two STS conference programs being offered in Las Vegas:

Sticking with STEM: How the Academic Library Can Help to Retain Successful Students, Monday, June 30, 8:30 am, LVCC-S220
STS Program Poster Session, Monday, June 30, 10:30 am, LVH-Pavilion 06

Science Retention Librarian will give academic librarians a place to discuss the library's role in STEM retention beyond the ALA Annual Conference 2014.

Erin O'Toole

 

More...

Event ACRL_STS Hot Topics Discussion - Sunday, Jun. 29, 2014 from 10:30 am to 11:30 am - LVCC-N113

by Kimberly Bailey on Mon, May 19, 2014 at 10:55 am

STS Hot Topics Discussion Group at ALA Annual: Electronic Lab Notebooks

Interested in learning more about Electronic Lab Notebooks (ELNs)? Be sure to attend the Hot Topics Discussion Group at ALA Annual in Las Vegas on June 29, 2014 from 10:30am to 11:30am in the Las Vegas Convention Center, Room N113.

STS Hot Topics Discussion Group at ALA Annual: Electronic Lab Notebooks

Interested in learning more about Electronic Lab Notebooks (ELNs)? Be sure to attend the Hot Topics Discussion Group at ALA Annual in Las Vegas on June 29, 2014 from 10:30am to 11:30am in the Las Vegas Convention Center, Room N113.

Kristin Bogdan, a Science and Social Science Data Librarian from Yale University, and her team will demonstrate LabArchives which is one of several ELN products. They will detail how their universities got the ELN process started, how ELNs fit into the library, exactly how the library fits into the whole picture, and what they have learned along the way. The speakers will talk for about 20-25 minutes and then a thorough discussion about ELNs will take place.

More...

Discussion ACRL STS CALL FOR RESEARCH PAPERS AND POSTERS

by Jack Maness on Thu, Jan 23, 2014 at 04:25 pm

CALL FOR RESEARCH PAPERS AND POSTERS

The Research Committee of the ACRL Science and Technology Section is hosting its Annual Research Forum and its Poster Session at the 2014 American Library Association Annual Conference in Las Vegas, NV, June 26 - July 1, 2014.

The Research Forum and Poster Session provide an excellent opportunity to share a wide range of research endeavors and methodologies relevant to science and technology librarianship. The Committee adheres to mentoring principles and utilizes a "blind" review process to select proposals.

CALL FOR RESEARCH PAPERS AND POSTERS

The Research Committee of the ACRL Science and Technology Section is hosting its Annual Research Forum and its Poster Session at the 2014 American Library Association Annual Conference in Las Vegas, NV, June 26 - July 1, 2014.

The Research Forum and Poster Session provide an excellent opportunity to share a wide range of research endeavors and methodologies relevant to science and technology librarianship. The Committee adheres to mentoring principles and utilizes a "blind" review process to select proposals.

Submissions for the paper and poster presentations are selected based on the abstract and significant progress by June 2014.  Writing style is critical and should be clear, concise, and organized. Abstracts should include some aspects of the research process.  Some examples are:

*         Hypothesis

*         Problem or purpose - research question or thesis - stated in one sentence.

*         Literature review in its simplest form - where your project fits with scholarly community.

*         Target group: people, animals, things etc. and relevant characteristics.

*         Methodology with essential components

*         Basic findings, including statistical limitations such as confidence intervals

*         Conclusions, implications, or applications

*         Contribute to the advancement of science and technology librarianship.

*         Demonstrate innovative and original research.

*         Contribute ideas for positioning librarians to be leaders both on and off campus.

Abstracts.  Abstracts should total no more than 250 words while addressing the aforementioned criteria.  Abstracts should indicate presentation category: Featured, Short Paper, or Poster Session.  Be sure to include your name, institution, phone, and e-mail address of all participants (not part of word count).  Please indicate whether or not the project was submitted to other conferences, for publication in a journal, published or presented before.

Featured Paper Presentations.    Our Featured Paper Presentation will be 20 minutes in length and followed by a thoughtful 10 minute critique from a guest commentator, who offers suggestions on how to prepare the paper for publication.  Proposals should reflect research that has been completed or initiatives that have already been implemented. At a minimum, significant progress should have been made toward completion or implementation.

Short Paper Presentations.  Short Papers are 10 minutes in length and may reflect research or initiatives that have been completed or are currently in progress. Short papers may also solicit feedback (5 minutes) on research ideas that are being formulated, outlining possible approaches and asking attendees and the guest commentator for their response.

Poster Presentations.  Submissions for the poster session are selected from two categories - STS Theme and Open Session.  The STS Theme for 2014 is "How can librarians assist with student diversity and retention in the STEM and health science fields at their institutions?"  The Open category is for research endeavors or practitioner projects outside the Theme that enhance science and technology librarianship.  Proposals should provide useful and practical findings, and opportunities for discussion.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF ABSTRACTS: Galileo's 450th Birthday, Saturday, February 15, 2014.  Submissions are selected by the STS Research Committee. Acceptance of proposals reflects a commitment by the author(s) to present at the ALA Annual Conference in Las Vegas.  Abstracts should be submitted via e-mail to Jack Maness, jack.maness@colorado.edu, and Greg Nelson, greg_nelson@byu.edu, Co-Chairs of the STS Research Committee.

 

More...

File STSPocket-Program-MW-2014

by Elizabeth Berman on Tue, Jan 21, 2014 at 12:47 pm

PDF File, 851.85 KB

Online Doc Upcoming (virtual) meeting of the ACRL/STS Science Resources: Discovery & Access Committee

by Larayne Dallas on Wed, Jan 15, 2014 at 01:40 pm

 

The ACRL/STS Science Resources: Discovery & Access Committee meeting is scheduled to meet (via conference call)

-February 3, 2014 (Monday)

-at 11:00 am CST (noon EST, 10:00 MST; 9:00 PST)

 

This is an open meeting and we welcome those interested in participating.

 

 

The ACRL/STS Science Resources: Discovery & Access Committee meeting is scheduled to meet (via conference call)

-February 3, 2014 (Monday)

-at 11:00 am CST (noon EST, 10:00 MST; 9:00 PST)

 

This is an open meeting and we welcome those interested in participating.

 

For information necessary to call in to the meeting, please contact Larayne Dallas at ldallas@austin.utexas.edu or (512)-495-4503.  Committee members and others expressing an interest will receive the phone number (which is not yet assigned) in advance of the meeting.  

 

 

 

Agenda for the Meeting of the ACRL/STS Science Resources: Discovery & Access Committee

Revised 1/15/2014

 

            Topics                                                              approximate start time for item

  1. Introductions                                                              (11:00 am CST)
  2. Updates from STS Council                                            (11:05 am)
  3. Updates from the MARC Advisory Committee                 (11:10 am)
  4. Committee history, charge, and background                  (11:15 am)
  5. Past projects and loose ends                                        (11:18 am)
  6. Finding next projects                                                   (11:25 am)
  7. Assignments to members                                             (11:50 am)
  8. Adjourn                                                                      (noon CST)

 

 

Betty Landesman (blandesman@ubalt.edu) and Larayne Dallas (ldallas@austin.utexas.edu), co-chairs

More...

Pages

To provide a forum through which librarians in scientific and technical subject fields can achieve and maintain awareness of the impact and range of information with which they work; to promote improved accessibility to and active use of this information.

Learn more about STS on the ALA website.

Subscribe to ACRL STS (Science and Technology Section)