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  • 1.  Libwizard "Tutorials" in the Wild

    Posted 7 days ago

    Hello Everyone, 

    I've been tasked with exploring potential uses of Libwizard with its Tutorial mode. So far, I'm not really understanding the practicality. I've used the Quiz and Survey features--which work great--but I'm not seeing any potential in their tutorial models. 

    Obviously, if I search "libwizard tutorials" I'm only going to get tutorials ON libwizard itself. 

    If anyone has any good examples of Libwizard tutorials in use, I would greatly appreciate it!

    Thank you 



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    James Thibeault
    Reference Librarian
    Quinebaug Valley Community College
    He/Him/His
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  • 2.  RE: Libwizard "Tutorials" in the Wild

    Posted 6 days ago

    The system is a bit limited in some ways but I can explain what I use it for at least; which I do find it useful for if you don't already have other tools to accomplish this already. 

    I have a series of tutorials that I built using the LibWizard tutorial. I use it to present video and text, in a single unified tutorial, combined with pre and post quizzes. In these cases, the bulk of my tutorials are in 5 parts. 

    1. A pre-quiz
    2. Three separate videos on a topic (such as Introduction to APA Formatting)
    3. A post-quiz.

    The quizzes serve both to reinforce learning and as an assessment of the video lessons. I don't have another tool that can easily present quizzes, videos, and text in sequence; along with reporting/auto-grading the quiz content for me. So because we don't have another platform for it, LibWizard tutorials are useful for that. 



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    Daniel Wilson
    Director of Library & Learning Services
    American InterContinental University
    He/Him/His
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  • 3.  RE: Libwizard "Tutorials" in the Wild

    Posted 6 days ago

    Thanks Daniel, 

    This is really helpful.  I thought they were designed more for "How-to" interactive material, but it seems like these tutorials are very useful for more interactive assessments. 



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    James Thibeault
    Reference Librarian
    Quinebaug Valley Community College
    He/Him/His
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  • 4.  RE: Libwizard "Tutorials" in the Wild

    Posted 6 days ago

    My previous institution was a cc and our faculty liked the certificate option that LibWizard allows. I also liked to include reflection questions in addition to quiz questions.

    Here are a few examples (some of which are dated):

    Evaluating Sources

    Plagiarism (this includes some video behind the proxy server)

    Library Lingo (This was created for ESOL students, but ended up being used by a number of Comp I's)

    So, they're not exactly beautiful or sophisticated, but it's easy to use if you're already paying for it.  It's also a great way to gather some assessment data. We actually created an OER textbook using LibWizard for a College Success course. The idea was to present information in small bits with reflection and quiz questions throughout to keep students engaged.



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    Emily Bush
    Instruction and Digital Learning Librarian
    Vanderbilt University
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  • 5.  RE: Libwizard "Tutorials" in the Wild

    Posted 6 days ago

    Hi James,

    I created a LibWizard tutorial for my institution's first year biology majors cell biology course. Because the course, in which they learn about scholarly articles, is large enrollment, and because the instructors want the material taught during the laboratory, it wasn't feasible to continue face-to-face and research consultations for 200+ students. The tutorial is on the long side, but includes quizzes on content and a pre- and post-test so I can continue to refine it where students are struggling.

    The tutorial is here: https://cmich.libwizard.com/f/bio112_photosynthesis. I've had several librarians at other institution ask to adapt it for their students, so I've made it available under a Creative Commons BY-NC license.

    I also have a stand-alone tutorial I created on article retractions that I'm still testing out: https://cmich.libwizard.com/f/retraction

    I hope this helps!
    Rebecca



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    Rebecca Renirie
    Medical and STEM Librarian
    Central Michigan University Libraries
    She/Her/Hers
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  • 6.  RE: Libwizard "Tutorials" in the Wild

    Posted 6 days ago

    We just started using LibWizard about a year ago for our library research skills modules that we had previously used Google Slides and Blackboard modules to deliver. We're still learning how to incorporate more features, but overall we like the platform for creating interactive digital learning objects.  Our initial goal was to create interactive tutorials for foundational info lit skills to supplement library instruction for first year writing students. To that end, they've been very successful and faculty like to assign them as pre-work for library instruction sessions. 

    Here are the ones we've created: 



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    Leah Richardson
    Director of Archives and Special Collections
    George Washington University
    She/Her/Hers
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  • 7.  RE: Libwizard "Tutorials" in the Wild

    Posted 6 days ago

    If you search "library tutorials", you should be able to find the many tutorials offered by academic libraries designed by Springshare's Libguide. 

    University of Arizona Libraries has a good one on what is citational justice. 

    https://lib.arizona.edu/tutorials/citational-justice/#/lessons/YiyiaZyL65dGKTp8G-o15XR521-C9uhq

    The two citations might be of particular interest. 



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    Xiping Liu
    Resource Description Librarian
    University of Houston Libraries
    She/Her/Hers
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  • 8.  RE: Libwizard "Tutorials" in the Wild

    Posted 2 days ago

    Hi there,

    I'm a little late to this discussion, but we have used LibWizard tutorials at my institution too. It has been useful for creating orientation tutorials and self-guided library tours. I worked with a colleague to create this Preventing Plagiarism tutorial as well: https://sandiego.libwizard.com/f/Plagiarism_Tutorial

    It's licensed under Creative Commons, so anyone is free to share or adapt it so long as they attribute. We're hoping to revise the tutorial within the next few months, but it has served us well so far as a go-to resource, and the certificate feature makes it ideal for instructors who want proof that their students have completed it.

    We haven't done it yet, but I suppose we could also embed a LibWizard quiz at the end of the tutorial as well if we really wanted to reinforce the learning outcomes.



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    Hugh Burkhart
    Associate Professor, Coordinator of Instruction and Undergraduate Learning
    University of San Diego
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