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Discussion Have you seen an amazing video lately?

by Katherine Perez on Thu, May 4, 2017 at 05:03 pm

Video Round Table Notable Films for Adults Committee Call for Nominees

Have you seen a fantastic film lately? We want to hear about it!

The VRT Notable Films for Adults Committee is accepting nominations for outstanding films. The Notable Films Committee selects up to 15 titles each year that represent the best films for libraries released in the past two years. 

Video Round Table Notable Films for Adults Committee Call for Nominees

Have you seen a fantastic film lately? We want to hear about it!

The VRT Notable Films for Adults Committee is accepting nominations for outstanding films. The Notable Films Committee selects up to 15 titles each year that represent the best films for libraries released in the past two years. 

The five categories of films that we consider for inclusion are Animation (non-feature length), Documentary/Educational, Personal Essay, Performance and Video Art and How-To or Instructional.

Titles must be nominated by librarians who are not affiliated with video producers or distributers, and who have viewed the film in its entirety.  

We need your suggestions!  If you would like to recommend a video, please read the criteria and selection procedures (http://www.ala.org/vrt/notablevideos/notablevideoscriteria) then fill out the suggestion form (http://www.ala.org/vrt/notablevideos/form)

You can also check out the 2017 Notable Films for Adults here!  

In 1998, the Video Round Table established the Notable Videos for Adults list, as a means of providing guidance to public and academic librarians involved in building dynamic and balanced video collections for an adult clientele. The list recognizes the growing number and enormous diversity of documentaries, educational and instructional titles, and performance works for adults available. Each year a committee comprised of VRT members selects the best fifteen educational, performance or how-to titles released during the previous and current calendar years. The committee makes its selections during the ALA Midwinter Meeting and the list is published in the March issue of Booklist.

Thank you! 
Kati Perez, Chair-VRT Notable Films for Adults Committee

 

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Discussion 2nd Call: VRT Notable Films for Adults Committee Call for Juror

by Katherine Perez on Wed, Apr 12, 2017 at 04:13 pm

The Notable Videos for Adults Committee still has one remaining vacancy to fill this year.  We aim for a balanced mix of librarians from academic, public, and special libraries who work with media and serve adult populations.   This is an opportunity to serve on a rewarding and enjoyable professional committee at the national level.  Representatives or employees of video producers or distributors are ineligible.

The Notable Videos for Adults Committee still has one remaining vacancy to fill this year.  We aim for a balanced mix of librarians from academic, public, and special libraries who work with media and serve adult populations.   This is an opportunity to serve on a rewarding and enjoyable professional committee at the national level.  Representatives or employees of video producers or distributors are ineligible.

Each member will serve a term of two years, with a maximum number of consecutive terms not to exceed two, for a total of four years of service.

 All committee members are required to:

•        Be members of the American Library Association (ALA) and the Video Round Table (VRT),

•     Attend ALA Midwinter for two consecutive years (Denver in February 2018 and Seattle in January 2019),

•     View and evaluate a substantial number of videos leading up to ALA Midwinter (For example, in 2016, over 60 titles were screened).

For complete information about the committee please visit our web page:  http://www.ala.org/vrt/notablevideos/

 If you are interested in volunteering for the committee, please respond directly to me by April 28th.  Indicate your membership status with ALA and VRT, your ability to commit to attending ALA Midwinter, and include information regarding your experience with videos (e.g., collection development, reviewing, viewer’s advisory, etc.).  Please contact me if you have any questions.

 Sincerely,

Kati Perez

VRT Notable Videos for Adults Chair

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Discussion 2 Openings on VRT Notable Films for Adults Committee

by Katherine Perez on Fri, Mar 10, 2017 at 01:09 pm

Hello Librarians,

The Notable Videos for Adults Committee has two vacancies to fill this year.  We aim for a balanced mix of librarians from academic, public, and special libraries who work with media and serve adult populations.  This year, we are looking for one librarian from a public or special library to balance out the committee.  This is an opportunity to serve on a rewarding and enjoyable professional committee at the national level.  Representatives or employees of video producers or distributors are ineligible.

Hello Librarians,

The Notable Videos for Adults Committee has two vacancies to fill this year.  We aim for a balanced mix of librarians from academic, public, and special libraries who work with media and serve adult populations.  This year, we are looking for one librarian from a public or special library to balance out the committee.  This is an opportunity to serve on a rewarding and enjoyable professional committee at the national level.  Representatives or employees of video producers or distributors are ineligible.

Each member will serve a term of two years, with a maximum number of consecutive terms not to exceed two, for a total of four years of service.

All committee members are required to:

•        Be members of the American Library Association (ALA) and the Video Round Table (VRT),

•     Attend ALA Midwinter for two consecutive years (Denver in 2018 and Seattle in 2019)    View and evaluate a substantial number of videos leading up to ALA Midwinter (last year, 67 titles were screened)

For complete information about the committee please visit our web page:  http://www.ala.org/vrt/notablevideos/

 If you are interested in volunteering for the committee, please respond directly to me by April 9, 2017.  Indicate your membership status with ALA and VRT, your ability to commit to attending ALA Midwinter, and include information regarding your experience with videos (e.g., collection development, reviewing, viewer’s advisory, etc.).  Please contact me if you have any questions.

Sincerely,

Kati Irons Perez

VRT Notable Videos for Adults Chair

kati....@gmail.com

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Discussion VRT Events at 2017 ALA Annual Conference

by Maureen Cropper on Mon, Feb 13, 2017 at 09:27 am

The ALA Video Round Table hopes you’ll join us in Chicago to learn, share ideas, meet old friends, and make valuable new connections. 

Please check out our wonderful lineup of programs!

 

VRT Gala: Tuned In, Turned On! Videofreex Tape the World

7-9 pm Sunday, June 25

The ALA Video Round Table hopes you’ll join us in Chicago to learn, share ideas, meet old friends, and make valuable new connections. 

Please check out our wonderful lineup of programs!

 

VRT Gala: Tuned In, Turned On! Videofreex Tape the World

7-9 pm Sunday, June 25

Join VRT for drinks and hors d'oeuvres followed by a presentation from Abina Manning, Director of Video Data Bank and Curator of a collection of over 1,400 tapes created by members of the Videofreex, one of the country's earliest radical video collectives. This dynamic multimedia presentation at the renowned Siskel Film Center will include rarely seen gems from the Videofreex archive featuring interviews with leading counter-cultural figures of the 1970s. This event coincides with the VRT and Cinema Guild co-sponsored "Now Showing @ALA" program screening of the feature length documentary "Here Come the Videofreex!"

ALA Ticketed Event http://2017.alaannual.org/ticketed-events

Tickets are limited; we encourage you to register early!

 

DAYTIME PROGRAMS:

(Free with ALA Registration / Exact dates & times TBA soon)

 

Video as Research Data:  Challenges & Solutions in Video Data Preservation

Videos are often taken as a part of scholarly research projects, yet this presents challenges for librarians who advise researchers on federally-mandated data sharing and storage. What are best practices for preserving, sharing, consent/privacy considerations and cost management? Attendees will learn strategies they can assess against needs at their home institution.

 

Rocking the Small Screen (Without Losing Your Mind): Planning and Managing Library Promotional Videos

Video on the web is one of today's hottest social networking trends.  But what can online videos do to promote your library?  David Lee King from Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library and Christina Norton & Justin Georges from Western Illinois University will share what they have learned and how realistic expectations can bring success.

 

Not Just Watching, Doing! Libraries Helping Youth Create Video Productions

Libraries are increasingly finding ways to help their school-age patrons to communicate creatively and make a positive impact in their communities through video projects. The Ak-Chin Indian Community Library in Arizona  and the Carson City Library in Nevada (partnered with the Carson City School District) will talk about their experiences and share tips.

 

How Are Our Instructors Truly Using Media:  A Multifaceted Approach to Developing Departmental Course Media Use Profiles

One of the greatest challenges for librarians working with media is deeply understanding the use of these materials in course context. This program will describe a multifaceted approach to this challenge that combines mining large corpora of departmental syllabi using text analysis software with reserves, survey, and interpersonal correspondence data.

 

Create, Communicate, Captivate: Inspiring Media Production in Your Library

Learn how academic, school and public libraries can help transform users from passive consumers of media into content creators. Attendees will be guided through key aspects of creating a thriving video production space, coaching users with effective instruction, and showcasing projects to promote and inspire more participation.

 

AMIA @ ALA Distributing Archives: Preservation, Restoration, and Access

Presented by the Association of Moving Image Archivists and co-sponsored by the VRT, this panel will feature representatives from Kino Lorber, Canyon Cinema, and Chicago-based Media Burn Archive. Attendees will learn about the difference between the preservation and restoration of moving images; and preserving the motion picture film projection experience.

 

We look forward to seeing you this summer!

Best Regards,

VRT 2017 Program Committee

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Discussion Survey About New Register of Copyrights

by Andrew Horbal on Wed, Jan 25, 2017 at 04:35 pm

Dear VRT members,

At our Executive Board Meeting at Midwinter on Monday, I mentioned that Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden has created an online survey where members of the public (that's us!) can tell her what qualifications we think the new Register of Copyrights should have. The survey is available online here until January 31:

https://www.research.net/r/RegisterOfCopyrights

Dear VRT members,

At our Executive Board Meeting at Midwinter on Monday, I mentioned that Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden has created an online survey where members of the public (that's us!) can tell her what qualifications we think the new Register of Copyrights should have. The survey is available online here until January 31:

https://www.research.net/r/RegisterOfCopyrights

In related news, the House Judiciary Committee has also requested written comments on what they're calling the first policy proposal to come out of their review of U.S. copyright law. More information can be found on the Judiciary Committee's website:

https://judiciary.house.gov/press-release/goodlatte-conyers-release-first-policy-proposal-copyright-review/

Although the VRT has no official position on either matter, we encourage all our members to respond to both calls for comments! I was also asked to share a list of the resources I use to keep current on copyright. Here are some of my favorites:

If you add these five sites to your RSS feed, you won't miss much! Two other resources you might want to check out are ACRL's SCHOLCOMM-L listserv and the Facebook group Schol Comm Pirates.

Last but (I hope!) not least, if you're a member of CCUMC, you might want to check out the Copyright Matters blog I edit, where among other things you will soon be able to find the full-text of my own personal response to Librarian Hayden's survey.

Hope this will help you all stay as informed as you want to be! 

Andy Horbal
VRT Vice Chair/Chair-Elect

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Discussion VRT Events at ALA Midwinter 2017

by Maureen Cropper on Wed, Jan 18, 2017 at 08:47 am

Below is the VRT schedule for the ALA Midwinter Conference in Atlanta.  Questions?  E-mail VRT!

Events are open to all except where otherwise indicated.
 

Below is the VRT schedule for the ALA Midwinter Conference in Atlanta.  Questions?  E-mail VRT!

Events are open to all except where otherwise indicated.
 

Saturday: January 21st

8:00 - 5:00 PM Notable Videos for Adults Committee (closed meeting), Marriott,  L502 Boardroom

The Notable Videos for Adults Committee will be deliberating about all of the films they've watched through the year and creating a list of the best of them.  If you are an advocate of films that address relevant social issues, consider joining next year's committee.  Contact VRT!

6:00 - 8:00 PM VRT Dinner, Mary Mac’s Tea Room, 224 Ponce De Leon Avenue

Please consider joining the Video Round Table for our Midwinter dinner.
VRT members, non-members, and their guests are welcome to attend!  RSVP by email to Andy Horbal and see you there.

Location:

Mary Mac's Tea Room
224 Ponce De Leon Ave NE
Atlanta, GA 30308
http://www.marymacs.com

404.876.1800

Sunday: January 22nd

1:00 - 2:30 PM Digital Media Discussion Group, OMNI, Pine Room

The topics to be discussed include streaming distribution of films without educational availability.  Want more information?  Contact Ben Franz, the discussion leader!

Monday: January 23rd

8:30-12:30 PM VRT Executive Board and Membership Meeting, Georgia World Congress Center, A303

Hot coffee and tea for attendees courtesy of VRT!
 

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Discussion Call for Proposals by VRT for 2017 ALA Annual in Chicago

by Deborah Benrubi on Fri, Aug 5, 2016 at 11:14 am

ALA’s Video Round Table (VRT) is currently accepting program proposals for the 2017 ALA Annual Conference, June 22-27 in Chicago, Illinois.

The VRT Program Committee welcomes proposals on just about anything related to video and libraries! Proposals are due August 31, 2016.

ALA’s Video Round Table (VRT) is currently accepting program proposals for the 2017 ALA Annual Conference, June 22-27 in Chicago, Illinois.

The VRT Program Committee welcomes proposals on just about anything related to video and libraries! Proposals are due August 31, 2016.

If you’re interested in submitting a proposal, please read the guidelines and complete the online form at: http://www.ala.org/vrt/2017-annual-program-proposal-information.

To spotlight the role the local community plays in this profession, we especially welcome submissions from Chicago-based video librarians, producers, educators and archivists that showcase your creative projects and programs.

The Program Committee will review all proposals and notify participants of proposal acceptance by Sept. 21, 2016.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Laine Thielstrom esthiels@colby.edu or Steven Milewski smilewsk@utk.edu, the Program Committee co-chairs.

We look forward to hearing from you!

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Discussion Celebrating Twenty-five Years of the Video Round Table: An Interview with Carleton Jackson

by Maureen Cropper on Thu, Jul 7, 2016 at 09:03 am

Carleton Jackson was one of the founding members of VRT. He is the Head of Library Media Services, University of Maryland Libraries, where he manages a library and staff specializing in physical and digital media collections.

 

What was happening in 1991 that (in your opinion) inspired the creation of VRT?

Carleton Jackson was one of the founding members of VRT. He is the Head of Library Media Services, University of Maryland Libraries, where he manages a library and staff specializing in physical and digital media collections.

 

What was happening in 1991 that (in your opinion) inspired the creation of VRT?

Actually the question should be what happened leading up to 1989, the beginning of the Video Interest Group. The VIG was created specifically to begin the process of creating VRT. The “Pearl Harbor” for this was the elimination of ALA Video and Special Projects unit (headed by Sally Mason-Robinson). That began a protest and organizational activity that lead a core group of media-oriented librarians to start creating a librarian-oriented and -driven group to meet our needs. It was led by a variety of folks who wanted immediate action. While there were about 20 of us who ran around and got signatures, went to hearings and lobbied folks (especially Gary Handman) the “official” figureheads became Sally Mason-Robinson (independent), Pat Lora (a public librarian) and Jennie Kreamer (a university librarian). VIG was created to be an umbrella interest group for all information that moves and/or makes a sound.

What was your role?

Even before that, many media interested folks started to loosely form with ALA groups that had similar interests and/or structures. For example, Gary Handman and I got together coming out of what was then known as “library instruction.” We came to video because each of our institutions were longtime film and video collectors. And we were relatively “young and groovy” (at least to ourselves). We had started working with others of like minds; now there was group to join in ALA that was media-oriented. ALA Video (which did create some early PR videos) was an internal ALA structure we could hang our skills on. There were groups outside of ALA for librarians (especially the American Film and Video Association) and university technology support (CCUMC) but there was no ALA member organization to join, per se. When ALA Video was cut because of budget constraints and the overwhelming short-sightedness of ALA, it was a call to arms!

The round table structure was identified as best for folks no matter what their institution. Public, school, university, and corporate librarians could find common ground. At that time a round table could only come from a demonstrated interest in a topic not already available, and two years of interest group activity was then the main way to demonstrate. So the Video Interest Group was formed, leading to the creation of the Video Round Table two years later.

What are some of the major changes you've seen over the years in both the VRT and media librarianship?

Note: There was then, and has been since discussion of the word “video” in the name. It was decided that the group was interested in all things media, but that video was “new” enough to hang the evolution of the group on. It was essentially an “emerging technology” though media had existed in other formats for a long time. But video (and other magnetic media) was making it a format “for the people.” It was cheaper to acquire, more readily able to be borrowed, and usable for groups and individuals. And publishing took off both for educational market and the new home market.

What may have created a second wave of media interest, was of course the opening of the digital frontier and evolution to the digital mainstream.  Media played a significant role in bringing text along with it. And the role of media-collection trained librarians expanded broadly first to collections and access, and later to media as data, creation of media-rich data, and instigated use.


Where do you see VRT—and the field of media librarianship—going in the future?

I don’t know if the name “video” is part of the future as much as some concept that shows that all data, all media, all material has become “transmedia” in collecting and access. Media librarians are now “everything” librarians, looking to a variety of methods of finding, creating, compiling, curating, using all data that are all about creation and use for all senses: visual (image, moving image, data visualization, presentation) audio (sounds, music, spoken word, raw and compiled data), big data curation for experiential learning, all the while still collecting, conserving, preserving and creating access and derivative uses. We are also now all about the crowd (sourcing) and the cloud.

You may note, either through luck or design, how many “original media” professionals are at the stages of their careers where they are directors, deans and heads of libraries, organizations, and institutions where media is not the specific mission, but where media collecting is very robust. It’s because we all know where we came from. ALA was publically behind for a long time even when the membership was far ahead. It’s the nature often of big groups to not reflect their own leaders for a time. But they catch up eventually.

 

Do you have any particular memories or stories from the early days of the VRT that you can share?

The most memorable of all activities is the networking and interaction of the members. We had battles with the ALA at first and later got ALA to support our skills and professional desires. But the networking of colleagues from all areas of librarianship and the interaction with those creators and distributors of media was always fantastic! We worked with top companies that dared to do more: the whole array of National Media Market companies and other independents. Some of the best were Films Incorporated, Time Life/Ambrose, Bullfrog Films, Women Make Movies, Films for the Humanities and Sciences (I like the old name still), Annenberg, National Film Board of Canada, First Run/Icarus Films. Really, there are too many to mention. In more recent years we’ve worked with companies that are part of the evolution to digital distribution like Alexander Street Press, Films Media Group, Media Education Foundation, etc. All were willing to work directly with libraries and librarians to move the industry and collections into the new world, sometimes a little late, but often before the wave.

And the folks who have been members of VRT and served the membership, and/or just got together for meetings, galas, programs and a whole lot of socializing are just really great, and often unique characters. To paraphrase Mr. McLuhan, the media librarians are the messengers and the messages!

 

*Many thanks to Carleton Jackson for allowing us to interview him, and to Rachel King for conducting the interview and compiling the responses, above.

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Discussion VRT Response to U.S. Copyright Office NOI re: 17 USC 108

by Andrew Horbal on Wed, Jul 6, 2016 at 09:47 am

Dear VRT members,

In accordance with a decision made at our Executive Board meeting on June 27,  I submitted the following response to the U.S. Copyright Office's Notice of Inquiry regarding potential revisions relating to the library and archives exceptions in the Copyright Act, 17 U.S.C. § 108 this morning (Wednesday, July 6):

Dear United States Copyright Office,

Dear VRT members,

In accordance with a decision made at our Executive Board meeting on June 27,  I submitted the following response to the U.S. Copyright Office's Notice of Inquiry regarding potential revisions relating to the library and archives exceptions in the Copyright Act, 17 U.S.C. § 108 this morning (Wednesday, July 6):

Dear United States Copyright Office,

At our June 27 meeting, the Executive Board of the American Library Association’s Video Round Table (an organization which is designed to serve the needs of both media librarians and those individuals who are involved with media matters in any way in their libraries) unanimously voted to respond to your Notice of Inquiry by regretfully declining this opportunity to provide feedback on potential revisions to 17 USC 108. The primary reason we are unable to fully participate in this process is that one month is not enough time for widely-dispersed, national organization like ours to solicit feedback from our entire membership. We did, however, wish to inform you that we fully endorse the “Statement of the Library Copyright Alliance on the Copyright Office’s Notice of Inquiry Concerning Section 108 of the Copyright Act” which is available online here:

http://www.librarycopyrightalliance.org/storage/documents/108noiposition2.pdf

We would particularly like to echo the LCA’s concerns about the lack of transparency related to this inquiry and note that we share their expectation that the Copyright Office will “publish a list of the interested parties it meets in the course of this inquiry as well as a detailed summary of what each of these parties advised.”

Sincerely,

The VRT Executive Board

We are urging all of our individual members to also utilize the meeting request form COMMENT BOX to express your support of library community copyright representatives (LCA), and concern with the lack of transparency with the Notice of Inquiry process and drafts changes to 17 USC 108. You may also wish to include other strategic and succinct concerns around 17 USC 108. For more information, please see the message Nell Chenault and Howard Besser sent to the VRT-L listserv on July 5.

Thanks!

Andy Horbal
VRT Vice Chair/Chair Elect

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Discussion VRT Events at Annual 2016

by Andrew Horbal on Fri, Jun 24, 2016 at 05:10 pm

139475 Further Down the Alphabet—Embracing B Movies! (co-sponsored with PLA). Can you recite the titles of every Oscar-winner, while finding yourself at a loss in the face of patron requests for movies about mutant vegetables? Never fear! This program will help you handle these requests with confidence. Come explore the world of B, C, and D movies to find films your patrons will love.  Saturday, 6/25, 10:30-11:30am, OCCC W206A

139475 Further Down the Alphabet—Embracing B Movies! (co-sponsored with PLA). Can you recite the titles of every Oscar-winner, while finding yourself at a loss in the face of patron requests for movies about mutant vegetables? Never fear! This program will help you handle these requests with confidence. Come explore the world of B, C, and D movies to find films your patrons will love.  Saturday, 6/25, 10:30-11:30am, OCCC W206A

139491 Section 108 VHS Preservation: A Collaborative Database for Due Diligence on VHS Videotapes in Academic Libraries (co-sponsored with PARS/ALCTS). Section 108 of U.S. Copyright law permits preservation of VHS videotapes but requires that a reasonable effort be made to discover the distribution status of each title. If that sounds daunting, don’t despair. This presentation will introduce you to a new database designed to help. It ispossible to preserve the VHS in your collection while staying on the right side of copyright law. Come learn how. Saturday, 6/25, 3-4pm, OCCC W101B

139484 Academic Library Streaming Video Revisited: Key Findings from the Follow-up Survey. The latest research available from this ongoing study reveals remarkable changes that will help inform academic librarians and administrators in planning and developing streaming video collections and services in a rapidly changing environment. This talk will tell you everything you want (and need) to know about recent trends in library streaming video collections. Saturday, 6/25, 4:30-5:30pm, OCCC W101B

139505 Creating Effective Instructional Video: From Collaboration and Design to Assessment. The demand for distance learning is growing exponentially, which means that the need for engaging online library instruction has never been greater. Come hear three experts offer their advice on creating—and assessing—top-notch video tutorials. Sunday, 6/26, 1-2:30pm, OCCC W103B

139533 Publishing Opportunities in Media Librarianship: A Panel Discussion. Do you want to publish but feel as if you could use some inspiration and advice?  This panel of accomplished authors and editors will be offering their tips for both experienced and novice writers. Bring your questions!Sunday, 6/26, 3-4pm, OCCC W206C

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The Video Round Table (VRT) provides leadership within the American Library Association (ALA) on all issues related to video collections, programs, and services in libraries. The VRT supports video advocacy within ALA, within the profession, and within our libraries. We understand ‘video' to include all formats, analog and digital; multimedia that includes video content; and the network delivery of digital or digitized video. The VRT will work with other organizations within ALA to promote video collections and services in all types of libraries. The Video Round Table is committed to forging strong alliances and relationships with the film and video production and distribution community to ensure the continuation of a diverse, high-quality universe of video programming.

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