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SRRT (Social Responsibilities Round Table) RoundTable

In: Social Change, Social Responsibilities Round Table (SRRT)
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Discussion ALA Executive Director Education Requirements

by Diedre Conkling on Mon, Dec 4, 2017 at 07:44 pm

ALA MEMBER ALERT

Do you agree that a library degree is essential for the Executive Director of ALA?  Please sign the petition to reinstate this requirement.  The degree required includes an ALA-accredited Master's Degree or a CAEP-accredited Master's Degree with a specialty in school library media. 

Click on the link below to sign. Please re-post widely.

ALA MEMBER ALERT

Do you agree that a library degree is essential for the Executive Director of ALA?  Please sign the petition to reinstate this requirement.  The degree required includes an ALA-accredited Master's Degree or a CAEP-accredited Master's Degree with a specialty in school library media. 

Click on the link below to sign. Please re-post widely.

The great thing about this is that having this question on the ballot all ALA Members will have the opportunity to officially express their opinion on this subject. 

After you login the page may seem a little odd. Go ahead and click on that you want to sign the petition. When you do this the full petition appears. You will then need to write out your full name and hit another button to finish signing the petition. 

https://tinyurl.com/ybyqpyw7

 

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Earlier discussion on this subject may be found here:  http://connect.ala.org/node/261265

A little background:

Last month, in a rushed, unprecedented online vote, ALA Council voted in favor of removing the requirement for the ALA Executive Director to hold the MLS degree.  ALA Council had just reaffirmed the 2000 Council decision that the ALA Executive Director must have an MLS at the 2017 Midwinter Meeting.  Just months later they changed this position to preferred instead of required.

And for you bureaucracy junkies membership petitions are allowed according to the ALA Constitution, Article VI, Section 4 c (http://www.ala.org/aboutala/governance/constitution/constitution).  Yes, because this is a membership organization we can overturn Council decisions. 

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Discussion GLBTRT 50th Anniversary Tshirt Design Contest

by Casey McCoy-Simmons on Mon, Nov 27, 2017 at 03:48 pm

In honor of the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Round Table’s 50th Anniversary coming in 2020, the GLBTRT Fund Raising Committee will be selling t-shirts -- and we need YOUR help to create them!

 

The Fund Raising Committee will be accepting t-shirt design submissions from GLBTRT members and supporters before putting the designs up to a vote to choose the shirt that best represents the Round Table’s past, present and future at the 50th Anniversary Celebration!

 

In honor of the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Round Table’s 50th Anniversary coming in 2020, the GLBTRT Fund Raising Committee will be selling t-shirts -- and we need YOUR help to create them!

 

The Fund Raising Committee will be accepting t-shirt design submissions from GLBTRT members and supporters before putting the designs up to a vote to choose the shirt that best represents the Round Table’s past, present and future at the 50th Anniversary Celebration!

 

Submission Guidelines:

  1. Designs must be created using Custom Ink’s Design Lab. All you have to do is open the Design Lab, add text, upload an image, choose your t-shirt color and style, then click “Save/Send”. Once you save the design, copy the shareable link provided and send to Jesus Espinoza at simr.espinoza@gmail.com with subject “GLBTRT T-shirt Contest”

    1. If you’d prefer to submit an image file instead, the design must be saved as a JPEG, PNG or PDF file type

  2. The design must:

    1. Include the spelled out round table name: Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Round Table

    2. Be branded as the GLBTRT’s “50th Anniversary Celebration” t-shirt

    3. If using a GLBTRT logo it must be an official GLBTRT logo found in the Google Drive Folder

  3. All designs must be submitted by January 10, 2018 -- Please email all submissions to Jesus Espinoza at simr.espinoza@gmail.com with subject “GLBTRT T-shirt Contest”

 

Just for fun: Consider exploring the history of the GLBTRT and include historical names, information, etc. as a nod to our past as we move into the future! (Check out the Google Drive Folder for examples of past GLBTRT t-shirts.)

 

Once we collect all your wonderfully creative, quirky and fun designs, they will be put up to an online vote. The winning design will be presented at Midwinter 2018 and the creator will win a year of free membership to GLBTRT and a chance to be a part of the roundtable’s history!

 

Questions? Email Casey McCoy, Fund Raising Committee Chair, caseyamccoy@gmail.com

 

Thank you and happy designing!

-GLBTRT Fund Raising Committee

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Discussion What are we to keep? thoughts on the National Collection (DttP Spring 2015 feature article)

by James Jacobs on Mon, May 4, 2015 at 11:03 am

I've written a piece for GODORT's journal Documents to the People (DttP) about the future of the national collection (aka FDLP collections). I hope you'll read and comment on "What are we to keep? Thoughts on the national collection" as well as the What are we to keep? FAQ which gives more context and additional bibliography.

I've written a piece for GODORT's journal Documents to the People (DttP) about the future of the national collection (aka FDLP collections). I hope you'll read and comment on "What are we to keep? Thoughts on the national collection" as well as the What are we to keep? FAQ which gives more context and additional bibliography.

The question of “how many copies” of print documents the FDLP should collectively keep is the wrong question asked for the wrong reasons and trying to answer it will only lead to the wrong answers and irreparable loss of information. For me, even thinking about answering it raises more questions. How can we know how many copies to keep unless we specify the purposes for which we wish to keep them? What are those purposes? How will we know if we are meeting our goals? How will discarding paper benefit users? How can we be sure that we are not losing information when we discard paper copies if we do not have an inventory of the paper copies that exist? How can we implement a policy that is so vague that it doesn’t define things like “a requisite number of copies,” and how decisions will be made, and which apparently treats a born-digital XML document created by GPO and an indifferent digitization without OCR text and missing its maps and foldouts as of equal value?

Let’s be clear. We are talking about the records of our democracy. Loss of even a single page could damage the ability of historians, journalists, economists, and citizens to understand our history and hold our government accountable for it successes and its failures. We have those documents now in our libraries; there are not hundreds or even dozens of copies of these documents floating around in used bookstores or elsewhere. They are in our charge.

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Discussion draft response to GPO policy - please comment!

by James Jacobs on Mon, Jul 28, 2014 at 11:09 am

GODORT has posted a DRAFT response to GPO's idea to change FDLP policy to allow regional depositories to substitute authenticated content on FDsys for tangible materials held at least seven years and, with Superintendent of Documents approval, discard these publications. Please check out the draft and let us know of any ideas, issues, concerns you may have.

Discussion Contact your representatives to save NTIS

by James Jacobs on Fri, Jul 11, 2014 at 10:57 am

At the last ALA conference held 2 weeks ago, the Government Documents Round Table (GODORT) passed a resolution in support of the NTIS. The text of the resolution is below. While the resolution passed GODORT, it has been sent back to ALA’s Committee on Legislation (COL) to work on some wording before being sent to ALA Council.

At the last ALA conference held 2 weeks ago, the Government Documents Round Table (GODORT) passed a resolution in support of the NTIS. The text of the resolution is below. While the resolution passed GODORT, it has been sent back to ALA’s Committee on Legislation (COL) to work on some wording before being sent to ALA Council.

Though it hasn't passed big ALA yet, we’re sharing the text of the resolution now in the hopes that readers — especially those in OK, MO, NE, AZ, MT and WI — will contact their representatives to tell them to SAVE THE NTIS!

RESOLUTION ON PRESERVING PUBLIC ACCESS TO SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL REPORTS AVAILABLE THROUGH THE NATIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION SERVICE

Whereas some three million scientific and technical reports are held by the National Technical Information Service (NTIS), thereby promoting research, innovation, and business;

Whereas since 1940, NTIS has been co-operating with federal agencies to collect, preserve, catalog, and provide their reports in paper, microform, and digital formats;

Whereas many federal agencies choose not to maintain collections of their own reports and to depend upon NTIS to provide these reports;

Whereas many federal agencies do not have statutory responsibility or the resources to provide permanent access to these reports and depend upon NTIS to provide them to other government agencies and the public;

Whereas the process of federal agencies entrusting their reports to NTIS ensures permanent access to the public, eliminates duplication of effort, and saves tax dollars;

Whereas since many of the federal agencies that published these reports no longer exist, many of their reports are only available through NTIS;

Whereas over two million of these reports are held only in paper or microform by NTIS and are not available in digital form from any source;

Whereas NTIS has the statutory authority to provide information management services to other federal agencies, including such programs as the Social Security Administration Death Master File used by insurance and annuity companies and the Drug Enforcement Agency Controlled Substances Registrants Data Base, which enables members of the medical community to prescribe and handle controlled substances, and the Federal Science Repository Service which supports the preservation and long-term access of participating agencies content;

Whereas the “Let Me Google That For You Act” ( S. 2206 and H. R. 4382) would abolish NTIS, and the “Frontiers in Innovation, Research, Science, and Technology (FIRST) Act” (H. R. 4186), as amended in the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, would repeal the law that authorizes NTIS;

Whereas these bills make no provision for the preservation of the reports and their cataloging data;

Whereas these bills do not provide libraries such as the Library of Congress, the national libraries, and libraries in the Federal Depository Library Program an opportunity to help “determine if any functions of NTIS are critical to the economy of the United States”;

Whereas the American Library Association has long supported the provision of all federal government reports and publications, at no charge, to the public through libraries and other services;

now, therefore be it

Resolved, that the American Library Association (ALA)

1. urges the United States Congress to appropriate funds to ensure that the National Technical Information Service (NTIS) continues to act as a central repository for scientific and technical reports;

2. urges United States Congress to fund the provision of these reports to the federal agencies and the public at no charge;

3. urges the United States Congress to consult with librarians at the Library of Congress, the national libraries, corporate libraries, and the Federal Depository Library Program (FDLP) in determining “if any functions of NTIS are critical to the economy of the United States”;

4. urges the United States Congress to put NTIS under the umbrella of the Office of Science Technology Policy (OSTP) directive, “Increasing Access to the Results of Federally Funded Scientific Research” (February 22, 2013); and

5. urges the United States Congress to fund a digital preservation plan for scientific and technical reports, which would be developed by NTIS, CENDI (formerly Commerce, Energy, NASA, Defense Information Managers Group), the Government Printing Office, the National Archives, federal publishing agencies, and the library community.

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Discussion FGI analysis of COL FDLP Task Force final report

by James Jacobs on Fri, Jun 27, 2014 at 02:00 am

Jim Jacobs and I have analyzed and have some comments on the FDLP Task Force's final report. You can find the comments at http://freegovinfo.info/node/8840 or below. We hope our comments are taken as constructive criticism. We appreciate the committee's work, but were left wanting so much more. Hopefully our comments will spur the committee, ALA, and the documents community forward to a better FDLP.

Jim Jacobs and I have analyzed and have some comments on the FDLP Task Force's final report. You can find the comments at http://freegovinfo.info/node/8840 or below. We hope our comments are taken as constructive criticism. We appreciate the committee's work, but were left wanting so much more. Hopefully our comments will spur the committee, ALA, and the documents community forward to a better FDLP.

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Discussion Librarians and Archivists to Palestine

by Amy Greer (non-member) on Tue, Apr 9, 2013 at 03:45 pm

Can we get to $10,000 by the end of April? Donate today and share with others to send an amazing group of librarians and archivists to Palestine! Learn more about our contingent and donate here: http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/librarians-and-archivists-to-palestine

Discussion Please sign our petition for open access to ALL govt information

by James Jacobs on Wed, Mar 13, 2013 at 01:27 pm

As part of Sunshine Week -- and in conjunction with the White House's new policy on Open Access to federally funded scientific information -- a small group of government information librarians has started a petition on petitions.whitehouse.gov asking the Obama Administration to assure that there is free permanent public access to ALL authentic government information.

As part of Sunshine Week -- and in conjunction with the White House's new policy on Open Access to federally funded scientific information -- a small group of government information librarians has started a petition on petitions.whitehouse.gov asking the Obama Administration to assure that there is free permanent public access to ALL authentic government information.

we hope you'll sign the petition and forward on to all your friends and social networks to help us reach our goal of 100,000 signatures by April 11, 2013! Thanks in advance!!


WE PETITION THE OBAMA ADMINISTRATION TO:

Require free online permanent public access to ALL federal government information and publications.

1. Assure that GPO has the funds to continue to maintain and develop the Federal Digital System (FDsys).

2. Raise ALL Congressional, Executive & Judicial branch information, publications & data to the level of federally funded scientific information & publish ALL government information as "Open Access."

3. Mandate the free permanent public access to other Federal information currently maintained in fee-based databases - including the Public Access to Court Electronic Records (PACER), the National Technical Reports Library (NTRL), & USA Trade Online.

4. Establish an interagency, govt-wide strategy to manage the entire lifecycle of digital government information w/ FDLP Libraries - publication, access, usability, bulk download, long-term preservation, standards & metadata.

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Discussion Libraries for Sustainability – Webinar #3 - Tues. 6/12 2pm-3pm (EST)

by Beth Filar-Williams on Fri, May 25, 2012 at 12:06 pm

 Libraries for Sustainability – Webinar #3 - Tues. 6/12 2pm-3pm (EST)

 Libraries for Sustainability – Webinar #3 - Tues. 6/12 2pm-3pm (EST)

In this third webinar, we will discuss and share opportunities for engagement in professional library organizations and other groups which might provide a forum for sustainability issues such as discussion groups, task forces, committees and social activities. Share your experiences with tools such as LinkedIn and listservs, organizations such as AASHE, ARL, ACRL, as well as state and regional associations. How can we initiate contact with such groups? Where shall we focus? How do we address the diverse needs of libraries in all sectors: public, academic, school, special and other? Come prepared to discuss and offer ideas for specific recommendations for successful sustainability activities within professional library organizations.

There will be the option for a group to convene in another virtual room for an ALA-focused discussion -- in particular, the future of Task Force on the Environment (TFOE). Plans are already underway for a face-to-face social gathering at the upcoming ALA Annual conference to consider how to best advance the sustainability message within our libraries and associations.

Sign up now:
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dFJHOUE5ZDBtdU9wMWVEYVV3ZGR4OUE6MQ#gid=0

Questions? Contact Madeleine Charney at mcharney@library.umass.edu or Beth FilarWilliams at greeningyourlibrary@gmail.com
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If you missed attending the second in our Webins series - Exploring Sustainabiltiy Practices in Libraries -  you can Watch the Webinar  or view Slides from 1st Webinar

If you missed attending the first in our Webinar series - Call to Action and Collaboration - here is the webinar recording  and the slides are available here

 

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The Social Responsibilities Round Table works to make ALA more democratic and to establish progressive priorities not only for the Association, but also for the entire profession. Concern for human and economic rights was an important element in the founding of SRRT and remains an urgent concern today. SRRT believes that libraries and librarians must recognize and help solve social problems and inequities in order to carry out their mandate to work for the common good and bolster democracy.

Learn more about SRRT on the ALA website.

Subscribe to SRRT (Social Responsibilities Round Table)