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Online Doc Suggested protocol for online chat meetings

by Kim Leeder on Thu, Jan 28, 2010 at 03:52 pm
Note: Patricia Smith, Executive Director of the Texas Library Association, shared the following with me (which she received from someone else) and I thought I would pass it on. -Kim Leeder

The following is how we conducted the online chats.

Note: Patricia Smith, Executive Director of the Texas Library Association, shared the following with me (which she received from someone else) and I thought I would pass it on. -Kim Leeder

The following is how we conducted the online chats.

  1. Prior to chat, the agenda, moderator and protocol for responding is established and delivered via email.
  2. Upon logging into most chat rooms, you can see who has logged in first and so on.  This is how the moderator knows who gets the first opportunity to respond.
  3. The moderator begins his discussion and allows the first person who logged in to respond first.
  4. The next in line can respond accordingly or type "still thinking, pass" (or something similar). It then goes to the next person for a response (round robin style).  The moderator can also give the next in line ten seconds to respond and if nothing comes through, then the next person can jump in.

It may appear that it would go slowly, but it doesn't.  You can see when your turn comes up next, and very often someone has already asked the same question or made a similar statement so there is no need to repeat yourself and moves the chat along.  When we "chatted" in our UNT classes, there would be twenty of us in an online chat and it flowed very well because we all honored the process.

These rules are not set in stone, it can be modified and other formats may work better.  However, having been involved in several chats w/ many people, this process has worked best.

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Discussion What Does Virtual Annual Look Like to You?

by Valerie Hawkins (staff) on Wed, Nov 11, 2009 at 10:13 am

Be sure to read and provide any comments or feedback to Jenny Levine's Marginalia Blog post --

Be sure to read and provide any comments or feedback to Jenny Levine's Marginalia Blog post --

What Does Virtual Annual Look Like to You?

For the first time this year,  “big ALA” experimented with offering a virtual conference component of its Annual Conference. While some of the divisions have done this in the past (ACRL, PLA) and AASL is currently running a parallel virtual event, this was the first time we’d tried this for the monster, “big kahuna” Annual Conference.

While you may be thinking about MidWinter because it’s just around the corner, we’re thinking about Annual, so the Conference Planning Committee has already started talking about how to improve next year’s virtual Annual. We have a three-year contract with Learning Times, so that will be the platform, but many of the other pieces are up in the air at this point, which makes it a good time to ask for some input.

We can’t promise anything at this point, but what’s your wishlist? There are already some “givens,” but building a structure around them, what would you like to see? Here are just a few of the questions we have, but feel free to give us feedback around other issues, too.

  • We can’t do this for free, not if we want to offer a quality, stable video feed. Keep in mind, though, that our members do tend to stream some of the more popular sessions, such as Top Tech Trends, and that will continue. Which sessions are you okay with as volunteer streams versus quality feeds?
  • We can’t stream the keynotes because the speakers don’t give us permission, and in fact, they usually forbid it. Otherwise, though, what types of sessions do you want to participate in remotely?
  • What does “participate in remotely” mean to you?
  • Where are the price points that fit? Are there tiers or does one-size-fits-all work in this type of situation?
  • Where can we add value to improve your virtual conference experience? Are you more interested in just sessions, or do you want virtual hallways, networking opportunities, and other comparable experiences, too? If it’s the latter, what do they look like?
  • If you’ve seen this done well somewhere else, we’d love to hear about it. Just give us a URL and a description of what you liked about it.

This is your chance to give us input to help shape the future of virtual ALA conferences, so please share your thoughts!


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Discussion Future Business (blog): Virtual is BETTER than in-person for events

by Valerie Hawkins (staff) on Wed, Nov 11, 2009 at 10:03 am

The Future Business blog has the following entry, dated November 9, 2009, with the rather audacious title, Virtual is BETTER than in-person for events. The actual blog entry is a more even-tempered comparison and contrast. The first few paragraphs:

Heh, OK…..After reading that title, I can imagine chips being installed on reader shoulders all around the world.  :)  I am not saying virtual is better in EVERY way, just in some ways.

The Future Business blog has the following entry, dated November 9, 2009, with the rather audacious title, Virtual is BETTER than in-person for events. The actual blog entry is a more even-tempered comparison and contrast. The first few paragraphs:

Heh, OK…..After reading that title, I can imagine chips being installed on reader shoulders all around the world.  :)  I am not saying virtual is better in EVERY way, just in some ways.

Have you noticed that people who oppose virtual events often focus only on the ways that in-person events are irreplaceable?  I believe they are right, but that does not mean in-person is the ONLY solution to EVERY collaborative/networking need.  Just because A is better than B in some ways does not mean that B is not better than A in others.

This post examines all the ways that virtual events are better than in-person ones.

 

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Discussion Arcvhiving / Tracking created content

by Aaron Dobbs on Mon, Jun 29, 2009 at 05:45 pm

LITA's Online Programming Task Force is looking for ways to archive, track, and manage the plethora of possible venues for online programming.

How do you track the stuff you currently post?
We're interested in how you track your own stuff, the presentations you do at conferences, from an organization sponsoring an online event perspective, or from any perspective.

LITA's Online Programming Task Force is looking for ways to archive, track, and manage the plethora of possible venues for online programming.

How do you track the stuff you currently post?
We're interested in how you track your own stuff, the presentations you do at conferences, from an organization sponsoring an online event perspective, or from any perspective.

Do you just tag stuff on your blog? Make space on a wiki and hope folks link to their stuff from there? Make formal agreements? Take an ephemeral, ad-hoc-ian, everything is transient approach?

Where would you expect to go to find a comprehensive listing of an organization's events?

Would you expect to find a comprehensive list of planned events as well?

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Discussion LITA EParticipation Task Force Recommendations

by Jenny Levine (staff) on Wed, Jun 24, 2009 at 09:42 am

I just wanted to note that the LITA EParticipation Task Force has posted a treasure trove of information and recommendations for holding meetings virtually or as a mix of in-person and online at http://wikis.ala.org/lita/index.php/EParticipation_Task_Force_Recommendations.

I just wanted to note that the LITA EParticipation Task Force has posted a treasure trove of information and recommendations for holding meetings virtually or as a mix of in-person and online at http://wikis.ala.org/lita/index.php/EParticipation_Task_Force_Recommendations.

Does anyone know of any committees/task forces/working groups that are implementing online participation during the 2009 Annual Conference? I don't mean simulcasting programs (like Top Tech Trends), but actual working meetings.

Maybe we could list them here so that we'd have a sense of who's doing what and we can check in afterwards to see how it went.

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To collect and display methods and technologies for enabling participation at a distance with the ALA and it's Divisions.

 

 

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