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Discussion Dance Librarians Discussion Group ALA Annual 2012 Meeting Minutes

by Helice Koffler on Sun, Jul 8, 2012 at 06:03 pm

I am attaching notes from the meeting to this post.

Discussion Dance Librarians Discussion Group ALA Annual 2012 Meeting Agenda

by Helice Koffler on Thu, Jun 14, 2012 at 11:42 am

Dance Librarians Discussion Group Agenda
(as part of the Arts Section All Discussion Groups Meeting)
Disney’s Grand Californian Hotel, Trillium Room B
Sunday, June 24, 2012
1:30 - 2:30 pm

1.    Welcome and introductions

2.    Announcements

Dance Librarians Discussion Group Agenda
(as part of the Arts Section All Discussion Groups Meeting)
Disney’s Grand Californian Hotel, Trillium Room B
Sunday, June 24, 2012
1:30 - 2:30 pm

1.    Welcome and introductions

2.    Announcements

3.    Dance Heritage Coalition (DHC) updates
Genie Guerard, UCLA Library and Dance Heritage Coalition Board Secretary/Treasurer and Libby Smigel, Dance Heritage Coalition Executive Director

•    “Secure Media Network,” Phase 2

•    “Hidden Collections” program CLIR grant for processing collections (part of “Foundations of Dance Research” project)

•    IMLS Fellows for 2012 progress report and call for 2013 applicants

•    Presentation: Drawing on their assignments at DHC member institutions, current Fellows, Irlanda Jacinto and J. P. "Penny" Huffman, will briefly share their insights into how librarians can tap the interdisciplinary significance of dance, both to enrich dance studies, and, to raise the importance of "dance" within the academy.  Irlanda is currently a student at the University of Arizona; she is stationed at the UCLA Library for her fellowship.  Penny is a recent graduate of the University of British Columbia; her fellowship is being hosted by the Museum of Performance & Design in San Francisco.

4.    Discussion topics:

•    Documenting local dance: Do your collections already include a significant amount of material from the local dance community? What, if anything, are you doing to collect material on the work being created and/or presented currently in your own community?

•    Open discussion

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Discussion Dance Librarians Discussion Group ALA Midwinter 2012 Meeting Minutes

by Helice Koffler on Thu, Feb 9, 2012 at 03:42 pm

I am attaching the minutes as a separate document. 

Discussion Transcript of Dance Librarians Discussion Group Virtual Meeting (January 12, 2012)

by Helice Koffler on Fri, Jan 13, 2012 at 04:27 pm

I am attaching an edited version of the transcript from the group's discussion yesterday with Stephen Manes, author of Where Snowflakes Dance and Swear. The raw transcript is available on the chat section of the DLDG page.

Discussion Dance Librarians Discussion Group ALA Midwinter 2012 Meeting Agenda

by Helice Koffler on Thu, Jan 12, 2012 at 05:32 pm

Dance Librarians Discussion Group
Agenda
Sheraton Dallas Hotel, Trinity 2
Saturday, January 21, 2012
1:30-3:30 pm

 

Dance Librarians Discussion Group
Agenda
Sheraton Dallas Hotel, Trinity 2
Saturday, January 21, 2012
1:30-3:30 pm

 

  • Welcome and Introductions
  • Announcements
  • Dance Heritage Coalition report: Kat Bell, who recently completed a fellowship with the Dance Theatre of Harlem, will report on DHC’s 2011 Fellowships in Preservation
  • Presentation by Sharon Perry Martin, Dallas Public Library on dance and performing arts collections at DPL
  • General discussion

Sharon Perry Martin is the manager of the Texas/Dallas History and Archives, History and Social Sciences, Genealogy, and Fine Books Divisions of the Dallas Public Library and has worked with the Dallas Public Library since 1995. She is also the coordinator for the Texas Center for the Book. She holds Masters of Science Degrees in Applied History and Library and Information Science from the University of North Texas. She is a member of the American Library Association and is active in the Texas Library Association. Ms. Martin is a TALL Texan (Texas Accelerated Library Leadership). She is a member of Zonta Club and the Dallas Woman’s Forum.

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Discussion Dance Librarians Discussion Group Virtual Meeting on January 12

by Helice Koffler on Thu, Jan 5, 2012 at 02:05 pm

Please join the Dance Librarians Discussion Group for our bonus virtual meeting on January 12, 2012 at 2:00 PM EST.  Our special guest will be author, Stephen Manes, whose recent book, Where Snowflakes Dance and Swear: Inside the Land of Ballet, provides backstage access to a major American ballet company, the Pacific Northwest Ballet.  Manes followed the company closely for over one year, documenting the 2007-2008 season and its aftermath in extraordinary detail.
 

Please join the Dance Librarians Discussion Group for our bonus virtual meeting on January 12, 2012 at 2:00 PM EST.  Our special guest will be author, Stephen Manes, whose recent book, Where Snowflakes Dance and Swear: Inside the Land of Ballet, provides backstage access to a major American ballet company, the Pacific Northwest Ballet.  Manes followed the company closely for over one year, documenting the 2007-2008 season and its aftermath in extraordinary detail.
 
To participate in the discussion, please sign up as a member of the Dance Librarians Discussion Group community page.

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Discussion DLDG Call for Midwinter Meeting Agenda Items

by Helice Koffler on Thu, Jan 5, 2012 at 11:14 am

Dear DLDG members,

Happy holidays!

I am happy to announce that the Dance Librarians Discussion Group will be meeting twice again this upcoming ALA Midwinter!

Our regular meeting at the conference has been scheduled for Saturday, January 21, 2012 from 1:30-3:30 PM and will take place at the Sheraton Dallas Hotel, Trinity 2.

We will also be hosting a virtual meeting on January 12, 2012 at 2:OO PM EST.  This meeting will feature a special guest, but we will have time for open discussion as well. 

More details to follow soon.

Dear DLDG members,

Happy holidays!

I am happy to announce that the Dance Librarians Discussion Group will be meeting twice again this upcoming ALA Midwinter!

Our regular meeting at the conference has been scheduled for Saturday, January 21, 2012 from 1:30-3:30 PM and will take place at the Sheraton Dallas Hotel, Trinity 2.

We will also be hosting a virtual meeting on January 12, 2012 at 2:OO PM EST.  This meeting will feature a special guest, but we will have time for open discussion as well. 

More details to follow soon.

Please post any agenda items or ideas for discussion topics for either meeting by Friday, December 30, 2011.

Thanks again, everyone.  As always, I look forward to seeing you in Big D and online!

Helice Koffler
DLDG Convener

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Online Doc An Interview with Jennifer Homans

by Helice Koffler on Fri, Dec 16, 2011 at 10:04 am

 

 

The paperback edition of Jennifer Homan's well received book, Apollo's Angels: A History of Ballet was issued by Random House in November.  I recently had the opportunity to interview Ms. Homans about the use of libraries and archives in her research process, as well as her reactions to the book's reception.  Below are some excerpts from that interview; the full version will appear in the January issue of Performance! (the newsletter of the Performing Arts Roundtable of the Society of American Archivists).


What was your inspiration or motivation for writing Apollo’s Angels

In a way the book came out of my own biography. When I was a dancer I wanted very much to read about the history of ballet, and I didn’t find the kind of books that were both historical in terms of dance, but also broader culturally. That was kind of lingering in my mind all of the years that I was dancing, and when I finally stopped dancing and then did a Ph.D. in modern European history, it all came together. It didn’t come together all at once. But I one day realized, “Oh, I could write that book!” 

When you were studying dance was dance history a part of the curriculum at the School of American Ballet at all?

It was not a part of the curriculum. That was another way in which there was a sense in my mind that there was a hole here.

Do you feel that studying dance history would be beneficial as a component of dance training?

Oh I do think so. Yes, I think it’s very important for dancers to have training in the history of their art form. It pleases me very much when I hear of dancers who are reading the book because I feel it is almost a resource tool. I found things in the history that people can use. Just the way musicians look back and they say, “Here’s a composer that we haven’t thought about for a while. Let’s look at that music and see what it can give us or how it can inspire us.” We can’t quite do that in dance because we don’t have the adequate notation and source material. But I hope that in this history I’ve been able to capture something of the projects and ideas that people in the past have been interested in that might end up being relevant to dancers and choreographers today.

Where did you primarily conduct your research?

Well, it took me all over the place, but there were a few places that were more important than others. The first was the archives at the Paris Opera. The second was the Archives Nationales.

The other library that was really important was the New York Public Library, which has an amazing dance collection and is very accessible.

Were you able to find things yourself or did you rely on librarians or archivists?

Oh, I think librarians are key. I relied heavily on librarians who knew the materials and the sources obviously much better than I did and so would steer me towards things. For example, when I was at the Paris Opera at one point, I asked [the librarian], “Do you happen to have any of the shoes of Marie Taglioni?” “Oh yes!” he said, “in fact we do.” And took me downstairs to the basement and into a part of the collection which I don’t think is normally accessed, and showed me all of these things that were there, not just the shoes, but costumes and other things they held, which turned out to be very important to how I made sense of the material. So I think that librarians can often be vital.

Dance books are hardly ever noticed in the mainstream press or media. Were you surprised by the book’s reception?

I was surprised. I spent fifteen years in the archives working on this alone. I’d often come home and I’d think, “I’m the only person in the world who thinks this is absolutely fascinating stuff!” So when the book came out and received so much attention, I was, of course, delighted. I would have written it even if I had known it wouldn’t receive the attention, but it was very nice that it did. And I think it was very good for the dance world to have the art form recognized as something important and something with a long and valuable history -- as part of our civilization.

What are some of your own favorite dance history books or most influential books?

I’m very fond of [Tamara] Karsavina’s memoir, called Theatre Street. I also like the memoirs of Alexandra Danilova, of Allegra Kent. But I have to say that I relied less on dance books than I did on general history books, cultural histories of the period –- of any period I was working in. If we stick with the early nineteenth century example, I drew heavily on the work of Ivor Guest, who did a lot of the very important primary work in that field. But I also was reading widely from [François-René de] Chateaubriand and [Théophile] Gautier and other cultural figures from the period and from historians who had studied them, as well as the dance.

Are there any major revisions or additions to the paperback edition?

There are a few corrections that people very kindly pointed out to me, which I tried to incorporate. There are one or two that won’t go into the paperback, but will go into the next edition. But not very many. And I did not change anything of substance.  My view is that a book is also a product of its time and this book had a certain integrity. Whether I’ve changed my mind about something since then is a different question, but the book itself stands for what it is and what it said in 2010. Because it too is a historical document in the end, right?

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Discussion Dance Librarians Discussion Group ALA Annual 2011 Minutes

by Helice Koffler on Fri, Nov 18, 2011 at 05:00 pm

Many apologies for taking so long to post this summary of the meeting and many thanks to Kathleen Haefliger for leading the meeting!

Pages

Provides a forum for dance librarians and others working in or interested in dance to discuss issues and exchange ideas; encourages, develops and supports projects which will improve access to and the organization of dance materials in libraries and archives; informs, educates and encourages cooperation through activities and programs on dance.

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