Syndicate content

ALCTS Creative Ideas in Technical Services Interest Group Community

In: ALCTS Interest Groups (Association for Library Collections & Technical Services), Technical Services
View:   Faces | List

Online Doc Report on ALCTS Creative Ideas in Technical Services Discussion Group Program at ALA Annual 2017

by Whitney Buccicone on Tue, Aug 8, 2017 at 11:26 am

On Sunday, June 25th, 2017, ALCTS Creative Ideas in Technical Services Discussion Group held a successful program with 46 attendees. We had nine unique topics with individual facilitators and asked each to list three main takeaways from their discussion.

On Sunday, June 25th, 2017, ALCTS Creative Ideas in Technical Services Discussion Group held a successful program with 46 attendees. We had nine unique topics with individual facilitators and asked each to list three main takeaways from their discussion.

Ivey Glendon (University of Virginia Library) presented Archivists and metadata librarians, library reorganization, and new understandings for archival description and discovery. This topic focused on the University of Virginia Library and its organizational restructuring which resulted in greater integration among special collections and non-special collections technical services staff. The conversation presented the following conclusions: define common vocabulary; provide training to be on the same page; and innovate different ways to offer your services in a way to let people say “yes”.

Sarah Hovde (Folger Shakespeare Library) discussed Cataloging & metadata outreach and expanded on how new challenges for cataloging and metadata professionals also offer interesting opportunities for collaboration and relationship building across a library community. From the discussion, the participants concluded that libraries could: tie outreach to existing programs (e.g. data management, statistics); encourage people to report errors - buy-in for database maintenance; and overcome barrier of isolation and physical space - assist other departments, use social media, and physically go to where other librarians are.

Dejah Rubel (Ferris State University) lead the discussion on the Changing nature of paraprofessional labor in Technical Services. This topic focused on how “technical services is changing very rapidly and tasks that were once the sole purview of professionals, such as complex copy cataloging or batch metadata editing, are now being assigned to para-professionals.” The discussion centered on: paraprofessionals are doing more without equal compensation; lines are blurring at many places between who does what; and skill levels and self-motivation are problematic and vary.

Nastia Guimaraes (University of Notre Dame) guided the topic of Application of project management in Technical Services, which focused on how “very few librarians have official project management (PM) training or have time to learn techniques used in the PM discipline” as well as collaborations across departments and workflows to successfully complete projects in a timely manner. The primary takeaways from this discussion were: communication is critical; how to measure the completion and success of  the project; and create a separate project management list of responsibilities so they know what’s expected (project charter, communication, retrospective meetings, etc).

The topic of Consortial Technical Services was lead by Christine Dulaney (American University Library) and focused on collaboration amongst consortial libraries which can take many forms. The focused takeaways were: consortia add a level of complexity that needs acknowledgement; cataloging staff must be comfortable with letting go of control of data because consortial models could be decentralized and effects data sharing; and that there are more questions than answers.

Data-oriented technical services in academic libraries discussion was facilitated by Haiqing Lin (C.V. Starr East Asian Library University of California Berkeley) and Karen Yu (University of Chicago Library). The conversation focused on the response to the growing field of data-driven scholarship and how academic libraries have begun to develop data collection and provide data-related services to researchers. Their takeaways were: data-oriented technical services will be the future; identity management is very important and necessary, and it is happening now; and librarians should work closer with researchers to provide the best research data services.

Unfortunately, no participants joined three table and those topics were not discussed

 

More...

Event Exciting discussions at ALCTS Creative Ideas in Technical Services IG during ALA 2017

by Amber Billey on Wed, May 24, 2017 at 10:45 am

ALCTS CITSIG ALA Annual 2017 Program

ALCTS CITSIG ALA Annual 2017 Program

Sunday, June 25, 2017

1-2:30PM at McCormick Place, W190b

 

Providing Textbooks for your students (Beth Bernhardt, UNC Greensboro)

In the past two years UNC Greensboro University Libraries technical services staff have be working with the bookstore to identify textbooks that the library can purchase as ebooks.  Many libraries across the country are doing this also, so this roundtable discussion would look at what works and best practices.

 

Archivists and metadata librarians, library reorganization, and new understandings for archival description and discovery (Ivey Glendon, University of Virginia Library)

In 2015, the University of Virginia Library conducted an organizational restructuring resulting in greater integration among special collections and non-special collections technical services staff, thus matching together groups with related but unique motivations:  careful stewardship for collections (important to the archivist) and broader access to the widest array of materials (energizing to the metadata librarians). This roundtable discussion will be an open discussion on changing organizational structures, exploring overlapping skillsets among technical services staff, and identifying opportunities for future collaboration.

 

Cataloging & metadata outreach (Sarah Hovde, Folger Shakespeare Library)

Current trends (increasing prevalence of non-MARC metadata, transitions to linked data, shrinking staff and budgets) represent new challenges for cataloging and metadata professionals, but can also offer interesting opportunities for collaboration and relationship building across a library community. Outreach efforts (for instance, lunchtime presentations, listening sessions, reading discussion groups, social media presence, flyers, etc.) by cataloging and metadata professionals can produce a number of outcomes: keep both users and fellow staff members informed and engaged with technical services departments, ensure that the time and effort of technical services staff are meeting users' needs, encourage support for metadata activities such as ILS upgrades, create opportunities for cross-departmental collaborations, and above all underscore the importance and relevance of metadata and cataloging work within an institution.

 

The Changing Nature of Paraprofessional Labor in Technical Services (Dejah Rubel, Ferris State University)

Technical services is changing very rapidly and tasks that were once the sole purview of professionals, such as complex copy cataloging or batch metadata editing, are now being assigned to para-professionals. There are many ways this can both positively and negatively impact the information profession, so I would like to discuss how we can positively embrace these changes while still awarding an appropriate level of recognition and support to these key organizational positions.

 

Application of project management in Technical Services (Nastia Guimaraes, University of Notre Dame)

ALA’s LLAMA lists project management as one of its 14 Foundational Leadership and Management Competencies (http://www.ala.org/llama/leadership-and-management-competencies), yet very few librarians have official project management (PM) training or have time to learn techniques used in the PM discipline. In addition, with the changing nature of the work TS departments are asked to perform and with the increasing level of cross-departmental collaboration on new library-wide initiatives, how ready are TS to manage additional projects more efficiently? This discussion topic will help participants examine possible ways of implementing PM in TS areas in a more meaningful way and offer some solutions to introducing added efficiency when running projects.

 

Building a better toolbox: when to create our own solutions and when to use vendor tools? (Morag Stewart, University of Washington)

The shift to cloud computing and library service platforms (LSPs), while a brave step for library systems technology, has not necessarily resolved issues in technical services processing.  According to Marshall Breeding in his 2017 library systems report, “Real progress depends on building out these platforms to support the new areas of service emerging within each type of library." However, the services he references may not include ordering, receiving, and cataloging of physical materials.  What software and other tools, library-born and otherwise, do staff turn to in order to process, track, and catalog a diverse array of formats and materials when the vendor system just won’t do?

 

Crowdsourcing for technical services projects (Regina Romano Reynolds, U.S. ISSN Center, Library of Congress)

Technical services staffs are challenged by the need to take on new projects to bring existing collections under control and new types and sources of resources to acquire and catalog, all with often inadequate staffing. Crowdsourcing can help cover these gaps. The Library of Congress Flickr project and a developing Law Library of Congress project will be used as examples, along with some library menu transcription projects available for online participation.

 

Consortial Technical Services (Christine Dulaney, American University Library)

In order to increase efficiency and reduce redundancy, many libraries which are members of consortia are encouraging their technical services departments to work more collaboratively.  This type of collaboration can take many forms including sharing expertise, sharing workloads, sharing personnel, or centralizing technical services within a consortia. This roundtable will discuss consortial projects which technical services departments have completed as well as the challenges which were overcome. Are consortial technical services projects threatening or do they create opportunities?

 

Data-oriented technical services in academic libraries (Haiqing Lin, C.V. Starr East Asian Library University of California Berkeley; Karen Yu, University of Chicago Library)

To response to the growing field of data-driven scholarship, academic libraries have begun to develop data collection and provide data-related services to researchers. However, how to organize data collection in order to make those research data accessible becomes paramount importance and presents a challenge to academic library community, in particular, technical services community. The emerging data collection and data-related service model are so different with traditional library resources and services, it is impossible to simply apply existing resources description methods to organize data collection. A new data description and access framework and service model, data-oriented technical service, need to be developed to meet the requirements of data-related services. This discussion will be conceived as a brainstorming session where participants will be able to present their idea about this new service model at academic libraries. The discussion will be focused on following issues,

• How to describe data, including data set and single piece of data

• How to represent data combining with metadata

• How to publish data, including data sets and single piece of data

• How to bring our existing  experiences to new data-oriented services model

More...

Event Thrilling discussions at ALCTS Creative Ideas in Technical Services IG during ALA Midwinter 2017

by Amber Billey on Tue, Dec 13, 2016 at 11:16 am

Join ALCTS Creative Ideas in Technical Services Interest Group for several thrilling discussions at ALA Midwinter 2017!

 

Join ALCTS Creative Ideas in Technical Services Interest Group for several thrilling discussions at ALA Midwinter 2017!

 

Location: Georgia World Congress Center, Room B202

Date and time: Sunday, January 22 from 1-2:30 pm

Format: Round-tablediscussions lead by multiple facilitators. Choose the one that interests you most. All tables will summarize their discussions and report back to the larger group at the end of the session.  We are also looking for volunteer note-takers for each of these - please e-mail either Amber Billey (ab3167@columbia.edu) or Whitney Buccicone (bucciw@uw.edu) if interested.

 

Metadata in the “Post-Truth” Era.

Facilitator: Timothy Mendenhal, Fordham University

Summary: Despite initial promises to democratize access to information and information resources, recent discourse emerging in the wake of the 2016 United States presidential campaign has highlighted how the online information ecosystem and social media platforms such as Facebook may have played a role in spreading “fake” news stories and misinformation, as well as in “siloing” their users so that they are not exposed to opposing points of view. Such an information ecosystem clearly demands a response from libraries, with their mission to encourage information literacy and transparency. In the technical services community, we often view information literacy as the domain of reference librarians, but as creators of metadata which is increasing sent out of the silo of the catalog and onto the open web, how should technical services librarians respond to the so-called “post-truth” era?

 

LCDGT (Library of Congress Demographic Group Terms).

Facilitator: Jessica Janecki, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book and Manuscript Library

Summary: The LCDGT is a new vocabulary. It is being developed for use with newly created MARC fields 385 (audience characteristics) and 386 (creator/contributor characteristics). The 385/386 fields are available for use in bib records and work/expression authority records. The LCDGT vocabulary is also available for use in other places where one might wish to use a demographic term, such as authority records for persons. The 385/386 fields can also be used with other vocabularies such as LCSH. This vocabulary in conjunction with these new fields has the potential to allow us to record facetable/indexable information about a work that our patrons want (I need books by women authors!) but without abusing the 650 (650__Women authors on a book that is by a woman rather than about a woman) or resorting to notes fields. We can discuss the new LCDGT vocabulary, its proposed uses, and hear from anyone who is currently using it or the 385/386 fields.

 

Contending with Chaos: Authority Control Strategies in a Digital World.

Facilitator: Joseph Nicholson, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Summary: While the need for authority control remains steady for traditional cataloging workflows, institutional repositories and other digital projects have placed stringent new demands on an aspect of library work that is notoriously labor-intensive, time-consuming, and understaffed. Faced with an avalanche of names and geographical headings that need to be transformed into authorized access points, many libraries that create NACO records or practice other local forms of authority control must engage in a kind of triage operation, focusing authority control efforts on a small subset of names while abandoning other headings to uncontrolled chaos. Centering on authority control workflows for both print and digital resources, this discussion will offer participants the opportunity to exchange ideas and creative solutions as well as address new developments in the field such as linked data.

 

All Things MarcEdit: Let’s Compare Notes!

Facilitators: Tim Kiser and Nicole Smeltekop, Michigan State University Libraries

Summary:  As cataloging workflows become more automated, catalogers are using more coding-oriented processes to complete a variety of tasks.  MarcEdit is one of the most commonly used programs for batch editing MARC records.  Many catalogers and metadata librarians are both impressed and a little intimidated by the robust capabilities of MarcEdit. This roundtable will focus on creative applications of MarcEdit in cataloging and metadata workflows. Come share your success stories and failures, tips and tricks, MarcEdit project ideas, and learning strategies!

 

The Evolution of Processing Materials.  

Facilitator: Crystal Hutchinson, Central Kansas Library System

Summary: Libraries that process all materials "in-house", now have less time to physically process materials. Staff shortages, lack of funds and more computer duties have made it harder to employ a staff member to "cover books". What are libraries doing in their library to accomplish this traditional service?

 

Authority Control in a Pre-Linked Data Environment.

Facilitators: Carol Ou, University of Nevada, Las Vegas and Adam Baron, University of North Texas

Summary: To prepare for the transition to BIBFRAME and linked data, libraries may want to review their current authority control practices. The ongoing maintenance of authorized access points in bibliographic records seems increasingly important sfo the access points can eventually be matched to URIs. As an intermediary step, some have also advocated for the insertion of URIs directly into MARC records. There is also the question of how to reconcile locally established names. This discussion will focus on how libraries might accomplish some of this work, while also exploring possible best practices and ways to improve efficiencies when it comes to authority control in the current MARC environment. Emphasis will be given to tasks that can be completed by library staff or an automated authority control vendor.

 

The Role of Cataloging in Transforming Library Metadata into Linked Data.

Facilitators: Lihong Zhu, Washington State University

Summary: Linked data has the potential to revolutionize the academic world of information creation and exchange. Basic tenets of what libraries collect, how they collect, how they organize, and how they provide information will be questioned and rethought. Limited pools of bibliographic records for information resources will be enhanced by data captured at creation. By harvesting the entire output of the academy, an immensely rich web of data will be created that will liberate research and teaching from the limited, disconnected silos of information that they are dependent on today.” (Philip Evan Schreur,  “The Academy Unbound: Linked Data as Revolution” https://journals.ala.org/lrts/article/view/5073/6144) This roundtable discussion will focus on what role cataloging should play in transforming library metadata into linked data.

More...

Online Doc Call for discussion facilitators #ALAMW17

by Amber Billey on Tue, Nov 1, 2016 at 03:53 pm

The

The Creative Ideas in Technical Services Interest Group (CITSIG) of ALCTS seeks facilitators for roundtable discussions for its meeting at ALA Midwinter Meeting on Sunday, Jan. 22, from 1:00-2:30.

 

Housed within the Association for Library Collections and Technical Services division of ALA, the Creative Ideas in Technical Services Interest Group was created to provide a forum to discuss issues related to the evolution of technical services. The group is especially interested in exploring the interdependency between departments and the ways in which technical services affects, and is affected by, technology and publishing trends.

 

Roundtable discussions are small, informal group discussions intended to give participants the opportunity to network, discuss best practices, and share information. Table size for roundtable discussions is capped at 10 participants per table. Discussion facilitators are responsible for identifying and developing a topic, creating discussion questions, and facilitating a discussion at the American Library Association’s Midwinter Meeting in Atlanta in January 2017. If similar proposals are submitted and accepted, facilitators may be asked to co-facilitate.

 

Those interested in participating as a discussion facilitator should submit a proposal that includes:

  • The topic you wish to explore. Topics should relate to acquisitions, cataloging, metadata, classification, or preservation in academic, public, special, or school libraries.

  • How the topic you wish to explore applies to the evolution of technical services.

  • Three sample discussion questions.

 

Please submit your proposal by Friday, December 2, 2016 via this form: https://goo.gl/forms/CBl5Ee7jYTdZrKx93

 

Contact Amber Billey (amber.billey@columbia.edu) with any questions.

More...

Online Doc CITS-IG Session at ALA Annual 2016

by Amber Billey on Fri, Sep 30, 2016 at 09:29 am

Creative Ideas in Technical Services Interest Group of ALCTS

Creative Ideas in Technical Services Interest Group of ALCTS

ALA Annual Conference 2016

June 26, 2016

1-2:30pm in Hilton Orlando, Room Lake Highland

Chair: Amber Billey, Columbia University Libraries

Vice Chair: Whitney Buccicone, University of Washington Libraries

Outgoing Chair: Kelly Smith, Eastern Kentucky University

Session Report

Approximately 35 conference attendees gathered on 6 topics for round tables discussions on a range of topics affecting library technical services. Each round table discussion was facilitated by a topic moderator that proposed the topic prior to the conference, and a note taker was selected from each group. The notetaker was asked to record the discussion and distill it into three “big takeaways” to report back to the wider group at the end of the session.

See the attached document for the full report.

More...

Online Doc ALA Midwinter 2016 CITSIG Roundtable Reports

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Tue, Apr 19, 2016 at 07:31 am

ALCTS Creative Ideas in Technical Services Interest Group (CITSIG) Meeting

Sunday, January 10, 2016, 3:00-4:00 pm | ALA Scheduler: http://bit.ly/1N8YIZx

64 Attendees

Kelly Smith, Chair 2015-2016

Amber Billey, Vice Chair 2015-2016

 

Trends in collection format and use

Facilitator: Amy Fry, Bowling Green State University

Important points

ALCTS Creative Ideas in Technical Services Interest Group (CITSIG) Meeting

Sunday, January 10, 2016, 3:00-4:00 pm | ALA Scheduler: http://bit.ly/1N8YIZx

64 Attendees

Kelly Smith, Chair 2015-2016

Amber Billey, Vice Chair 2015-2016

 

Trends in collection format and use

Facilitator: Amy Fry, Bowling Green State University

Important points

  • Push back to vendors – push from top
  • People still want print
  • Restrictions on use -> Publishers haven’t made them open; faculty don’t understand they have these restrictions – 4 hrs. checkout – Need to make ebooks usable as books
  • eBooks don’t work well outside of fiction
  • eBooks leaving packages problematic
  • DDA – short term loan or strategically build useful eBook collection we couldn’t afford

Biggest takeaways

  • Not common to purchase multiple formats
  • Single/multiple record issues
  • Knowledgebase content problems
  • Survey our own institutions to push back
  • Space squeeze; lack of storage
  • Less collaboration? Consortia woes.
  • Get rid of print books we have in e?

 

Merger mania: What is the fall out and what are the concerns?  

Facilitator: Joe Badics, Eastern Michigan University

Important points

  • Concerns about a monopoly – no control, no choice – competition needed to have choice of price, service options
  • Mergers / Subsidiaries – it’s a mess and confusing
    • Who do I contact?
    • Competitor’s products//future of products
    • Backfile?
    • Switch of titles between publishers

Biggest takeaway

  • People need to stay alert to what is going on! Librarians need to justify who we do business with and be more business savvy.

 

How can technical services staff use their skills to go beyond/work around "standard" systems to better serve their users' needs?

Facilitator: Betty Landesman, University of Baltimore

Most important points

  • There are collections that are not well served by LCSH.
  • There are local issues (funding, consortial practice, etc.) that are problems
  • There are local needs (university author lists, theses) that are not being met

Biggest takeaways

  • Don't

be confined by vocabularies, budgets, vendors, staffing, user behavior, insularity.

  • Do

Build your own vocabularies (create or use other thesauri)

Expand existing schema (MARC) to the max

Use freeware (Google forms) to help catalog problem titles

Work to change job descriptions and nurture staff in new roles

Use shelf-ready solutions

Teach users to search

Network within and outside your institution

 

Metadata for institutional repositories: Who catalogs the digital library?

Facilitator: Ellen Bahr, Alfred University

Important points

  • Ownership varies from institution to institution: Librarian who started IR; student workers; catalogers & archivists together
  • Authorities used in metadata: LC in some cases, fast headings in some cases, keywords in others
  • IR referalls are mainly from search engines, not catalogs, so MARC records in catalog are probably not needed – except theses & dissertations. ETDs are in catalog in most instances & half institutions have automated systems to do this so it’s relatively quick & easy.

Biggest takeaway

  • Professionals may not be needed to complete IR metadata – that work can be delegated to staff or students in most cases

 

Managing e-serials: Creating an interdependent workflow between multiple technical services department for large academic libraries

Facilitator: Ying Zhangm, University of Central Florida

Important points

  • eResources needs more resources – how can libraries shift some of the work from units doing print cataloging or even eResource cataloging to help eResources, particularly as libraries are trying to shift from print to e?
  • Things shift from print to electronic – how do we communicate those changes? Close communications from collection development to eResources/Acquisitions to Cataloging and then back is important although workflow tools are still being developed
  • What gets cataloged in an increasingly electronic & discovery level coded environments? KB generated MARC records help as does OCLC Worldcat Management Systems when also cataloging title level data from packages

Biggest takeaway

  • eResources departments need more support! Organizations are looking at altering structure where they can but collections decisions and budget challenges are making adaptation slow while day-to-day existing work must go on. Communication between groups is vital.

 

Staff-led change in technical services

Facilitator: Jeanne Harrell, Texas A&M University

Important points

  • Empower people to think outside of what they do.
    • Do we need to keep doing it?
    • What can we eliminate?
    • Why are we doing this?
  • Remove multiple steps – simplify – ask people that are doing the job
  • Fear @ losing their jobs – reassure them, add projects if not enough to do
  • Communication is key – more transparent – need to know if there are parameters.
  • Codify procedures – shared drive or wiki – and review them regularly
  • Meet with other departments

Biggest takeaway

  • The more communication the better.

 

Does location matter? Creating a user-centric technical services dept. in an off-site location 

Facilitator: Christine Dulaney, American University

Important points

  • Response of tech services staff: “marginalized” “had no say” “no discussion” “flabbergasted”
  • Other “non-tech-services” staff are now apprehensive & appreciate current proximity
  • New Technology           
    • New initiatives – “behind closed doors but central”
    • Remote Storage / Scanning = w/offices
    • Questions:
      • User-centric tech services = user-facing? Is it a mindset?
      • Student employees?
      • Liability?
      • Successful tech services by nature = “being invisible”; need to counter this by being our own advocates

Biggest takeaways

  • Reactive: No endorsement for tech services
  • Need to be proactive & advocate by:
  1. Strategic planning / space / services / needs for tech
  2. User-centric = user-facing; we love our users
  3. Historically success means being invisible, self-effacing - need to advocate instead
  4. Work done by tech staff (rushes, holds, etc.) – circ often “gets credit” because they hand items to patrons; need to evolve those services (scanning, rushing, ordering, notifying, etc.) and take credit for them

 

The Age of Enlightenment arrives in technical services  

Facilitator: Laura Turner, University of San Diego

Important points/questions

  • How have our jobs in tech services given way to a larger role that was perhaps unexpected or that go beyond the position’s normal scope of duties? What were the factors that created the need?
    • Working in a small library as a contract worker in a position that merged two positions: a reference position and a cataloging position. There are only 11 library staff, all librarians, so they all do everything.
    • Working as an acquisitions and collection management librarian, but had to absorb periodicals from Reference into tech services, and electronic resources too—came from Ref to TS. In a previous position, working as an acquisitions librarian, but had to help out in Reference when staffing issues required it.
    • Working as a cataloger, but is also the liaison to the Music Dept. At first, the understanding was that I would be helping with collection development, but this past summer was asked to help with an accreditation project to establish a Master’s degree program in the department. This required a lot of coordination among several staff in the library, which has been time consuming, and also delving deeply into the library environment in a larger way.
    • Working as a music cataloger, but seem to do very little cataloging. There is a lot of research that is required, and a lot of committee work. I am probably only cataloging about half of the time.
    • Was hired as an Institutional Repository manager, and I still do that, but I’ve been pulled into chairing a committee that is managing the Law School web site. Also, my department has taken on a lot of marketing for the library, and we are in the center of it although other departments around campus are involved. Our traditional workflows are shrinking in tech services. The marketing piece involves news feature updates, designing visuals, tying into social media, etc.
    • Working in a community college library in tech services, but have had to spend a lot of time on a campus curriculum committee and have taken on systems duties. Also, am having to give about three orientations to the library per week and work reference.
    • Working as the Head of Tech Services, but I was asked to be a space planner for the library in addition to my usual duties. I consulted with architecture faculty and had to visit lots of sites to get ideas, and then had to serve as a consultant to the architects.
    • Who or what have you had to consult while taking on these additional duties? What helped to make you more comfortable?
      • Worked with a colleague who had more technical expertise in the area
      • Watched a more experienced librarian who fills the same role as they perform their work, and get pointers
      • Developed a committee to organize in a more holistic way and to plan
      • Went to my supervisor to get advice
      • Online research, and attending conference sessions to get ideas---finding out how others handle similar challenges in their libraries
    • How has assuming the new duties had an impact on your “normal” duties?
      • Have had to restructure priorities and workflows
      • Empower the staff
    • How was it to step out of your comfort zone?
      • Mostly positive reactions.

 

Biggest takeaway

Discussion centered on having associated or transferable skills but having to apply them in a new context or a new way that involves, in some cases, a steep learning curve. In some cases, time frames were really tight, or work needed to begin right away. In others, a larger administrative view is affecting how quickly work and changes can be made. There were also deadlines external to the library that had to be accommodated, and this had a direct impact on how much time could be spent learning how to accomplish the assumed duties. However, the general core of the discussion revealed that there is a definite understanding that there is a good way to not only perform the new duties, but to learn them, and that a lot of thought has to be given to both when one is suddenly faced with new expectations.

More...

Event ALA Midwinter 2016 CITSIG Roundtable Meeting Agenda

by Kelly Smith-KY on Wed, Jan 27, 2016 at 09:01 am

ALA Scheduler Link

Please join us for 8 roundtable discussions on a variety of topics. Choose the one that interests you most! We look forward to seeing you there!

1. Trends in collection format and use

Facilitator: Amy Fry, Electronic Resources Coordinator, Bowling Green State University

ALA Scheduler Link

Please join us for 8 roundtable discussions on a variety of topics. Choose the one that interests you most! We look forward to seeing you there!

1. Trends in collection format and use

Facilitator: Amy Fry, Electronic Resources Coordinator, Bowling Green State University

Libraries are buying more ebooks and increasingly using DDA as a method of acquisition. However, studies indicate most library users prefer print and the data about ebook use is problematic and misleading. How can libraries approach collection development and management responsively and responsibly? Using all the formats and methods of acquisition for collections at our disposal, libraries need to find a way to build collections that will be in the right format at the right time for the right needs. What strategies for collecting and analyzing data will help us make the best decisions?

2. Merger mania: What is the fall out and what are the concerns?

Facilitator: Joe Badics, Acquisitions Librarian, Eastern Michigan University

Recent years have seen an increasing number of mergers and sales and a major vendor bankruptcy. How does this affect the way our institutions do business?

3. How can technical services staff use their skills to go beyond/work around "standard" systems to better serve their users' needs?

Facilitator: Betty Landesman, Head of Technical Services and Content Management, University of Baltimore

We're a long way from the brave new world of linked data, working in "the cloud", etc., but our users can't wait for that brave new world.  If our ILS/OPAC doesn't suffice to market new materials, or LCSH when we have specialized materials that have their own vocabularies [and LC's genre headings project doesn't include them], or if using ERM-type software like SFX is handled only by people in other departments, what CAN we do or change - even if it's a small thing - to go "outside the box"?

4. Metadata for institutional repositories: Who catalogs the digital library?

Facilitator: Ellen Bahr, Information Systems Librarian, Alfred University

The introduction of institutional repositories (and other digital asset management systems) has made metadata creation a more complex task. Libraries take a variety of approaches to creating metadata for digital collections, sometimes locating the work with a repository manager/staff, and sometimes involving catalogers and technical services staff. This roundtable will explore approaches to creating metadata for digital collections, at both small and large institutions, with a focus on effective workflows and staffing models.

5. Managing e-serials: Creating an interdependent workflow between multiple technical services department for large academic libraries

Facilitator: Ying Zhang, Interim Head of Acquisitions & Collection Services, University of Central Florida

This roundtable will discuss how electronic resources, collection services, cataloging and interlibrary loan collaborate in designing a workflow to manage the changes in e-serials. Departments in technical services are used to close collaboration in the print world. With the exponential growth in electronic resources and increasing use of discovery services, the workflow relies entirely on constant communication to ensure timely updates and seamless access in the catalog and discovery services. Not only do departments in technical services become codependent with each other, but they are also pushed closer to the public services.

6. Staff-led change in technical services

Facilitator: Jeanne Harrell, Interim Director of Collection Development Operations & Acquisitions Services, Texas A&M University

Libraries in general seem to be less "top-down" than they used to be.  Has this approach reached technical services yet? 

7. Does location matter? Creating a user-centric technical services dept. in an off-site location

Facilitator: Christine Dulaney, Director of Technical Services, American University

As library space in the main library is considered at a premium for "student-facing" activities, space for non-student facing activities such as technical services departments are vulnerable to relocation to an off-site facility.  How can technical services demonstrate value as a student-facing activity?  How can technical services provide user-centric cataloging and access from an off-site location?  How can technical services prevent feeling detached from library users?

8. The Age of Enlightenment arrives in technical services

Facilitator: Laura Turner, Head of Technical Services, University of San Diego

Today’s technical services librarian serves such roles in the academic library as workshop/classroom instructor, development officer, library administrator, exhibit creator, and faculty liaison.  This discussion will focus on the opportunities and challenges of thinking about ourselves first as librarians, then as professionals that work within our library's technical services department. 

More...

Event Creative Ideas in Technical Services Interest Group

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Tue, Jun 16, 2015 at 07:07 pm

1. Topic: The impact of discovery layers on Technical Services staff
Facilitator: Erika Johnson, University of San Francisco

While some libraries have made the switch to next-generation library systems that only have a discovery layer, others are running both a discovery layer and a traditional catalog. This discussion will investigate whether such duplication is still necessary for some resources, and the impacts on tech services staff.

1. Topic: The impact of discovery layers on Technical Services staff
Facilitator: Erika Johnson, University of San Francisco

While some libraries have made the switch to next-generation library systems that only have a discovery layer, others are running both a discovery layer and a traditional catalog. This discussion will investigate whether such duplication is still necessary for some resources, and the impacts on tech services staff.

2. Topic: Redesigning libraries and archives using user experience design
Facilitator: Alexandra Lederman, Teachers College, Columbia University

As digital repositories grow into maturity, how can libraries and archives redesign them to maximize design and patron experience? We'll examine well-designed and recently re-designed digital archives while considering a question set inspired by user experience (UX) design.

3. Topic: Streaming media
Facilitator: Beth Bernhardt - Assistant Dean for Collection Management and Scholarly Communications
Streaming Media - Come join the discussion on how technical services departments are handling request for streaming media. How do you fill these requests? What are the options for streaming media? And how are you communicating this information to your users?
4. Topic: Acquisitions of digital materials
Facilitator: Dana Haugh, Teachers College, Columbia University

Materials budgets have shifted to accommodate large journal and database subscriptions, single-title article access, and most recently, ebook holdings. Can libraries use the digital age as a means to change the digital publishing system and distribution?

5. Topic: Assessment and Technical Services
Facilitator: Leanne Finnigan, Temple University Libraries

Though library assessment has long been associated with public services, technical services departments increasingly play an essential role, both as supportive partners and as the subjects of assessment. In this discussion, we will share challenges we face and brainstorm ways to engage in assessment most effectively.

6. Topic: Using service experience design to create user-centered library services
Facilitator: Meredith Powers, Teachers College, Columbia University

How can library staff be encouraged take a user-centered approach towards library services as a whole, rather than as independent entities? The concept of service experience design takes a macro view of user/patron experience, and can help us take a broader approach to policy development. Discuss how looking at the library from a holistic perspective might lead us to better evaluate and assess the whole library ecology, and deliver better user services in all contexts.

7. Topic: Cataloging and Describing Graphic Materials: Negotiating New Terrain
Facilitators: Nicole Smeltekop, Michigan State University Libraries and Tim Kiser, Michigan State University Libraries
As more technical services work becomes automated, many of us have found that cataloging becomes more directed toward the unique materials held by our institutions. This roundtable will focus on practices in cataloging and describing graphic materials of all kinds (maps, posters, photographs, and more) in both physical and digital formats.

More...

Event Creative Ideas in Technical Services Interest Group

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Mon, Jan 26, 2015 at 02:44 pm

1. Topic: Toward a symbiotic relationship: Technical Services and Special Collections/Archives

Facilitator: Mackenzie Brooks

This roundtable discussion will focus on the potentially symbiotic relationship between technical services and special collections and archives. As automation frees up staff time (theoretically), how is your technical services department taking advantage of the opportunities for original metadata creation for your institution’s unique materials?

2. Topic: Blended positions in Technical Services

1. Topic: Toward a symbiotic relationship: Technical Services and Special Collections/Archives

Facilitator: Mackenzie Brooks

This roundtable discussion will focus on the potentially symbiotic relationship between technical services and special collections and archives. As automation frees up staff time (theoretically), how is your technical services department taking advantage of the opportunities for original metadata creation for your institution’s unique materials?

2. Topic: Blended positions in Technical Services

Facilitators: Erin E. Boyd, Elyssa Gould, & Emily Sanford

"Blended" positions are positions for which 25 % or more of the job responsibilities encompass more than one area within a library. This topic will discuss new opportunities and challenges that come with job responsibilities, skills, and knowledge that expand upon what is considered the traditional "technical services" position.

3. Topic: Developing skills in Cataloging Department personnel

Facilitators: Dan Tam Do, Hayley Moreno

In recent years, numerous changes have occurred in the bibliographic universe, where RDA, BIBFRAME, linked data and programming languages are ever more widely discussed and applied. This roundtable discussion hopes to challenge participants in forecasting the future of cataloging as well as generate ideas on how we can develop the skills of current personnel to succeed in that future.

4. Topic: Best practices for batch editing bibliographic and authority data

Facilitator: Julene L. Jones

How are you keeping your catalog “clean”? With potential ILS migrations, large changes in authorized access points, and the mixing of RDA and legacy metadata, what best practices do you use for batch editing your bibliographic and authority data?

5. Topic: Strategies for improving awareness and access to data among departments in medium and large academic libraries

Facilitators: Peter Spyers-Duran, Kristine J. Shrauger

In this forum we will discuss strategies for improving awareness and access to data among library departments—data that is stored in different locations, in different formats, and is often password protected. We will explore ideas concerning organizational structure and culture, training, information management, and the utilization of technology.

More information about this conference session

More...

Event Creative Ideas in Technical Services

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Fri, Jun 20, 2014 at 07:37 pm

Join us for round table discussions with your colleagues to share creative ideas in Technical Services. Topics include:

Join us for round table discussions with your colleagues to share creative ideas in Technical Services. Topics include:

1. Libraries implementing patron driven acquisitions programs experience many operational challenges. This round table discussion will focus on how libraries are addressing metadata, budgeting, workflow, and other issues arising from this complex service. Table moderated by Kelly Smith from Eastern Kentucky University Libraries.
2. The potential of digital objects and collections to open alternative paths for Technical Services librarians and present new avenues for us to re-assert our relevancy in the digital age. Table moderated by Rachel Jaffe and Stephanie Hess from Binghamton University Libraries.
3. Taking cataloging skills outside the Cataloging Department. This round table discussion will focus on how the skills of catalogers and other traditional technical services units can be applied to other areas of the library. Table moderated by Marcy Strong of River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
4. Cross-departmental strategies for eliminating backlogs. This round table discussion will focus on implementing cross-departmental teams and innovative ways for tackling backlogs. Table moderated by Brad Cole and Liz Woolcott from Utah State University.
5. How do you juggle creative ideas, the skills needed to sustain and successfully launch these ideas, and possible fears about how these ideas will entail change? Table moderated by Jennifer Eustis from the University of Connecticut.

More information about this conference session

More...

Pages

Provides a forum for discussion of issues within the field of technical services which are relevant to library staff at all levels, particularly those issues relating to the evolution of technical services as it affects and is affected by technology and greater interdependency among all library departments.

Subscribe to ALCTS Creative Ideas in Technical Services Interest Group