Syndicate content

ALCTS International Relations Committee (Association for Library Collections & Technical Services) Committee

In: Association for Library Collections and Technical Services (ALCTS), International Relations
View:   Faces | List

Online Doc ALCTS 2013 Online Course Grant for Library Professionals from Developing Countries

by David Miller on Mon, Nov 26, 2012 at 11:13 am

The Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS), a division of the American Library Association, is now accepting grant applications for the ALCTS online Fundamentals courses, for course sections beginning between February 25 and September 9, 2013. One free seat per section is available to librarians and information professionals from developing countries.

The Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS), a division of the American Library Association, is now accepting grant applications for the ALCTS online Fundamentals courses, for course sections beginning between February 25 and September 9, 2013. One free seat per section is available to librarians and information professionals from developing countries.

For full information about the grant, including criteria and a link to the application form, please see: http://www.ala.org/alcts/awards/grants/onlinegrant. Applications may be submitted between November 26 and December 30, 2012.

Fundamentals of Acquisitions
Session 1: March 11 – April 5

Session 2: May 6 – May 31

Session 3: August 19 – September 13

The Fundamentals of Acquisitions (FOA) web course focuses on the basics of acquiring monographs and serials:  goals and methods, financial management of library collections budgets, and relationships among acquisitions librarians, library booksellers, subscription agents, and publishers.  In this course, you will receive a broad overview of the operations involved in acquiring materials after the selection decision is made.  Note that in FOA, we distinguish between collection development, which involves the selection of materials for the library; and acquisitions, which orders, receives, and pays for those materials. 

Fundamentals of Collection Assessment

Session 1:  February 25 – April 5

Session 2:  April 29 – June 7

Session 3:  July 29 – September 6

This six-week online course introduces the fundamental aspects of collection assessment in libraries. The course is designed for those who are responsible for or interested in collection assessment in all types and sizes of libraries. The course will introduce key concepts in collection assessment including the definition of collection assessment, techniques and tools, assessment of print and electronic collections, and project design and management.

Fundamentals of Electronic Resources Acquisitions
Session 1: February 25 – March 22

Session 2: April 15 – May 10

Session 3: July 29 – August 23

The Fundamentals of Electronic Resources Acquisitions (FERA) Web course will provide an overview of acquiring, providing access to, administering, supporting, and monitoring access to electronic resources.  It will provide a basic background in electronic resource acquisitions including product trials, licensing, purchasing methods, and pricing models and will provide an overview of the sometimes complex relationships between vendors, publishers, platform providers, and libraries.
 
This course is sponsored by Harrassowitz.

Fundamentals of Collection Development and Management
Session 1: March 4 – March 29

Session 2: April 29 – May 24

Session 3: August 5 – August 30

The Fundamentals of Collection Development and Management addresses the basic components of these important areas of responsibility in libraries. Components include complete definition of collection development and collection management; collections policies and budgets as part of library planning; collection development (selecting for and building collections); collection management (e.g., making decisions after materials are selected, including decisions about withdrawal, transfer, preservation); collection analysis—why and how to do it; outreach, liaison, and marketing; trends and suggestions about the future for collection development and management.

Fundamentals of Preservation
Session 1:  March 25 – April 19

Session 2:  May 13 – June 7

Session 3:  September 9 – October 4

The Fundamentals of Preservation introduces participants to the principles, policies and practices of preservation in libraries and archives.  The course is designed to inform all staff, across divisions and departments and at all levels of responsibility. It provides tools to begin extending the useful life of library collections.  Components include preservation as a formal library function and how it reflects and supports the institutional mission; the primary role of preventive care, including good storage conditions, emergency planning and careful handling of collections; the history and manufacture of physical formats and how this impacts preservation options; standard methods of care and repair, as well as reformatting options; and challenges in preserving digital content and what the implications are for the future of scholarship.

More...

Online Doc Knowledge Management Section Report by Lois M. Chan

by Sai Deng on Fri, Jan 15, 2010 at 11:14 am

Report from IFLA Standing Committee on Knowledge Management

2009

Milan Satellite meeting report

Report from IFLA Standing Committee on Knowledge Management

2009

Milan Satellite meeting report

The Knowledge Management (KM) Section held a satellite meeting, "Removing Barriers to Knowledge Sharing" in Milan on August 21.  Although its content was excellent, unfortunately, the meeting was poorly attended.  Attendees were mostly the Standing Committee members.  At the Standing Committee meeting in Milan, a question was raised regarding whether satellite meetings were needed as the IFLA Conference was already long.

Milan Open Sessions

The KM Section was a contributor to a 4-hour Open Session jointly held with the Library and Research Services for Parliaments Section and the Information Technology Section on Tuesday, August 25. The topic of the joint session was "Social Computing Tools for Learning and Knowledge Sharing."  It was well attended with around 400 attendees. Unfortunately none of the papers for this Session was available on the conference web site.

The KM Section also presented an Open Session by itself on Thursday, August 27. The two-hour KM Open Session on the topic "Knowledge Advocacy" was also well attended, with around 150 attendees.  The three speakers who presented were well received.  All three papers were available on the conference web site, along with another paper whose presenter was not able to come to the conference.

Planning for the 2010 Conference to be held in Goteborg, Sweden

The general theme for the 2010 Conference in Goteborg is "Open Access to Knowledge -- promoting sustainable progress," and the new IFLA president's theme is "Libraries Driving Access to Knowledge". These will be used as guides for possible topics for the KM Section’s sessions.

More...

Online Doc Acquisition and Collection Development Section Report by Sha Li Zhang

by Sai Deng on Fri, Jan 15, 2010 at 10:17 am

Acquisition and Collection Development Section

Sha Li Zhang, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

The 75th IFLA Conference, with a theme of “Libraries Create Futures: Building on Cultural Heritage,” was held in Milan, Italy, August 22–27, 2009. Previously, Italy hosted three IFLA conferences in 1929, 1951, and 1964 respectively in Rome. This year, the city of Milan, renowned as one of the world capitals of design and fashion, welcomed more than 3,800 librarians from over 130 countries, despite tough economic climate around the world.

Acquisition and Collection Development Section

Sha Li Zhang, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

The 75th IFLA Conference, with a theme of “Libraries Create Futures: Building on Cultural Heritage,” was held in Milan, Italy, August 22–27, 2009. Previously, Italy hosted three IFLA conferences in 1929, 1951, and 1964 respectively in Rome. This year, the city of Milan, renowned as one of the world capitals of design and fashion, welcomed more than 3,800 librarians from over 130 countries, despite tough economic climate around the world.

The Opening Session

As always, the opening session was one of the highlights of the IFLA conference. Congratulatory remarks, speeches, and Milano-styled performances offered the audience memorable moments. Mr. Mauro Guerrini, President of the Italian Library Association and the Italian National Committee, welcomed all attendees at the opening session. Mr. Guerrini attributes the importance of libraries in preserving the treasures and keeping records of cumulated knowledge of science, arts, literature, religion, and music; libraries should also keep in pace with the changes in technologies to disseminate information. Mr. Guerrini outlined professional improvements in the field of library and information science in Italy, with increasing participation of the LIS professionals in the public debates on open access, balance of copyright issues, and the convergence of libraries, museums, and archives. He encouraged the audience to share best practices, tolerate and respect to each other, and build upon the tradition for the future. Of course, he also assured the conference attendees to enjoy Italian culture, arts, fashion, and food.

The keynote speaker was Ms. Nicoletta Maraschio, President of Accademia della Crusca, a leading institution in the field of research on the Italian language and the holding place for the history of Italian language. Ms. Maraschio is the first female president of the institution since 1583 when it was established. As a well-known literary researcher and linguistic expert, Maraschio emphasizes that language is our past and our future; libraries play an important role in preserving human records. In her speech, IFLA President Claudia Lux continued her presidential theme, Libraries on the Agenda. During her two-year term, Ms. Lux has advocated that libraries should play an active role in shaping and influencing the agendas of our communities, regions, institutions, governments, and international bodies. She asked the librarians to have a new fashion style, keep up with the fashionable services, and to be creative in meeting the needs of users.

During the opening session, attendees were able to view libraries in Milan and Lombardia in Italy through a video projection. Additionally, the audience was guided through history of civilization through the five performing tableaus which were interspersed with speeches, including performances on Roman civilization and the manuscript tradition (tableau vivant I), on Dante, Leonardo and the invention of perspective (tableau vivant II), the birth of Gazettes and of journalism (tableau vivant III), Italian opera and birth of the musical book industry (tableau vivant IV), and on modern styles of Italian fashion and digital technology of libraries (tableau V). Indeed, it was really a Milano-styled opening session.

The Standing Section Meetings

Two Standing Section Committee meetings were held during the IFLA conference. At the first meeting on August 22, Lynn Sipe, Section Committee Chair, shared the feedback from the IFLA 2008 Conference in Quebec. The attendees were in general quite satisfied with the IFLA conference in Quebec. Mr. Sipe also reported that the section’s 2009 midterm meeting held in Beijing went very well. Regarding the committee projects, the translations for Gift Instructions from English to other IFLA working languages are underway. The Russian language translation is already on the web site. The Chinese version is in the fine tuning stage. The project on Electronic Resources Guidelines was being finalized at the meeting. At the second Standing Section meeting on August 26, Judith Mansfield, new committee chair, continued discussions on the committee’s strategic plan, some of which will need to be updated. The committee briefly discussed the open program idea and conceptual framework for the 2010 IFLA Conference. The Committee decided to hold its mid-term meeting in March 2010 in Moscow. The plan is well underway, with coordination from Ms. Natalia Litvinova, Standing Committee Member and Head of Networked Resource Acquisitions Department at the Russian State Library in Moscow.

The Standing Section’s Open Program

The Standing Section Committee held its open program during the IFLA Conference: an e-book kaleidoscope: multiple perspectives on libraries’ experiences with e-books. About 200 attended people the program. As the program title indicates, six speakers from libraries in four countries shared their experiences using e-books as integrated library resources to meet their users’ needs. Ms. Agnes Perrone from Parma University and Northumbria University in Italy presented her findings on the usage of e-books through literature reviews. Ms. Ellen Safley from the University of Texas at Dallas in presented her library’s experience when they implemented EBL’s Customer Selection of e-book program; nearly 100 percent of purchased e-books were being used by the libraries’ users. Mr. Owen Tam discussed the eight-university library consortium in Hong Kong to acquire e-books; the consortium’s e-book project received the support from the local government to encourage resource sharing. Ms. Li Zheng demonstrated the usage of e-books in China through OPACs, web navigation, and link resolvers to make e-books mobile and downloadable. Barbara Genco offered the benefits of e-books at public libraries in the United States where users are interested in popular e-book titles. Many e-book platforms have greatly improved, making them easy to read. Some public libraries offered MP3 players to users to download the e-book content. A question and answer session followed the presentations.

The Invitational Session: Digital Library Futures: User Perspectives and Institutional Strategies

This one-day session by invitation only was held on August 25, 2009 during the conference. I attended this session with one of the two invitations given to the Section Committee. The session was hosted by the University of Milan, and sponsored by the IFLA Professional Committee and the Italian government. It focused on digital collections and their users. Mr. Antonia Recchia, Italian Minister of Cultural Heritage, and Elio Franzini, Dean of the Faculty of Humanities at the university, welcomed all attendees. IFLA President Claudia Lux opened the session. Professor David Nicholas, Director of the Department of Information Studies and CIBER, University College, London, offered insightful observations. Mr. Nicholas noted that the Google generation behaves in certain ways. For instance, younger people “bounce” more on Google; viewing activities have replaced reading activities. People are more like navigators who love to travel, but do not always like getting to the destination. Horizontal has replaced vertical; people do not always use the same platform while surfing the web. There are differences in web surfing among nationalities, age, gender, and the younger generation will unlikely know the word “collection.”

Other speakers at the session include Daniel Teruggi, INA/Chair of Europeana User Group in Paris, France, on using a variety of ways to receive user feedback, e.g., online surveys with incentives, feedback indexes, log-in analysis, focus group surveys, expert analysis, etc.. Elke Greifeneder from the Berlin School of Library and Information Science at Humboldt University, discussed analysis of the characteristics of digital library users in multiple locations, with multilingual, and across multiple time zones. Einar Rottingen from the University of Bergen, Norway discussed access to digital collections, especially classical music and scores. Susan Hazan from the Internet Office of the Israel Museum, spoke on user-generated data through Google and other social networking tools (web 2.0) and explored how users participate. Zhu Qiang of Peking University discussed digital library development in China. Rossella Caffo from the Institute for the Union Catalogue of Italian Libraries and Bibliographic Information, Ministry for Cultural Heritage and Activities in Rome, Italy, discussed Italian digital projects. John Van Qudenaren from the Library of Congress introduced the World Digital Library Project. Herman P. Spruijt from the International Publishers Association, stressed the responsibilities of publishers to maintain archival data for the future generation, with a question as to alternatives to Google model that publishers should offer. The closing remarks came from Penny Carnaby from the National Library of New Zealand and Anna Maria Tammaro from the University of Parma in Italy. Ms. Ellen Tise, IFLA President-Elect, officially closed the session.

The Library Visit

I had a rare opportunity to visit the Biblioteca Universita di Bologna, Italy where I gave a paper at an IFLA satellite conference prior to IFLA. The university was founded in 1088, and is the oldest one in the western world. Evolved from reading rooms, the university library was established in 1803, with more than 500,000 volumes. The encryption on the door entrance of the old part of the building reads “Medicine of the Soul.” Due to space constraints, the library uses highly dense compact shelves for its print collections. It also uses a robot system to retrieve the items requested through OPAC terminals at the library. At the time of my visit, because it was during the summer, the library along with other university facilities, was officially closed. My private tour to the library was given by Mr. Franco Pasti, the Director of Public Services. During my visit, I also learned that in Italy, while the library is open to the university students and public, the library staff report to the Ministry of Culture in Rome, instead of the university itself. That is, the library staff are not university employees. Though the library tour was short, I am grateful for the time and introduction from Mr. Pasti.

IFLA 2010 Annual Conference

The 2010 Conference will be held in Gothenburg, Sweden, August 10–15, 2010. It was originally planned to be held in Brisbane, Australia. Due to financial difficulty, the venue was moved to Gothenburg. Librarians from Sweden distributed brochures and other information to welcome all to the 2010 IFLA Conference in their country.   

 

More...

Online Doc Serials and Other Continuing Resources Section Report by Jina Choi Wakimoto

by Sai Deng on Fri, Jan 15, 2010 at 10:14 am

Report from the IFLA Serials and Other Continuing Resources Section

World Library and Information Congress: 75th IFLA General Conference and Council was held in Milan, Italy, from 23-27 August 2009, with the theme of  "Libraries create futures: Building on cultural heritage".

Standing Committee Meetings

Report from the IFLA Serials and Other Continuing Resources Section

World Library and Information Congress: 75th IFLA General Conference and Council was held in Milan, Italy, from 23-27 August 2009, with the theme of  "Libraries create futures: Building on cultural heritage".

Standing Committee Meetings

Serials and Other Continuing Resources Section (SOCRS), a standing committee in the Division of Library Collections, held two meetings, on Saturday 22 August and on Tuesday 25 August.  Ann Okerson from Yale University (USA), the Chair of the committee presided over the meetings.  The global economic crisis was felt in many areas: 1) the SOCRS’s planned preconference in Bolzano, Italy was cancelled at the last minute due to low registration, 2) the Milan Congress registration was low compared to previous years and even though measures were taken to scale down the Congress, deficit was projected for Italian hosts, 3) IFLA cancelled the 2010 Congress in Brisbane, Australia and made the announcement that Göteborg, Sweden will host the 2010 IFLA Congress.  There were some controversy and discontent, as this move meant that Asia/Oceana region is bypassed for a Northern Europe site.

IFLA has been restructuring, so now there are 5 divisions. SOCRS is now in Division II (Library Collections).  The first committee meeting was largely devoted to the discussion of the failed preconference in Bolzano, possible cause and what measures we can take for a future success of preconferences.  The suggestions included one-day only preconference, preferably at the same location as the Congress, or in large urban centers with built-in populations.  The Election was held for a new Chair: Helen Adey from Nottingham Trent University (U.K.).  The second committee meeting’s discussion was centered around the changes in the leadership and the resulting logistical changes, such as the move of SOCRS listserv and newsletter from Yale to IFLA.  

Open Program

The Section’s open program with 5 presentations with the theme, Serials in the 21st century: new concepts, new challenges, drew about 175 people, a very large number.  It was generally received as one of the best programs of the conference.  Presentations were:

In the presentations, a couple of common themes in this time of change seem to have emerged.  Blurring and blending of traditional boundaries that existed between various sectors, be it monographs v. serials, publishers v. open access repositories, subscriptions agents v. consortia.  At the same time, decoupling is happening in some areas, for example, in some business services, and article content from its journal wrapper.  We are witnessing new roles being played and new alliances that are being forged as the paradigms shift.

Very lively discussions ensued following the presentations.  It was a very successful program.

Full papers of the presentation are available at: http://www.ifla.org/annual-conference/ifla75/programme2009-en.php#wednesday

This meeting, without a doubt, made progress toward achievement of ALCTS Strategic Plan goal, Area 4 (ALCTS collaborates with organizations with similar or complementary interests), particularly numbers 2 & 5.

Respectfully submitted by Jina Choi Wakimoto,

Member, IFLA Serials and Other Continuing Resources Section

Faculty Director, Cataloging and Metadata Services

Acting Associate Director for Technical Services
University of Colorado at Boulder

 

More...

Online Doc Newspaper Section Report by L. Suzanne Kellerman

by Sai Deng on Fri, Jan 15, 2010 at 09:50 am

Newspapers Section

The August 2009 World Library and Information Congress 75th IFLA General Conference and Assembly convened in Milan, Italy with the theme "Libraries Create Futures:  Building on Cultural Heritage."   Over 3,000 delegates, exhibitors and attendees enjoyed the stunning cultural venue of Milan - a city known as one of the renowned capitals of fashion and design in the world.

Newspapers Section

The August 2009 World Library and Information Congress 75th IFLA General Conference and Assembly convened in Milan, Italy with the theme "Libraries Create Futures:  Building on Cultural Heritage."   Over 3,000 delegates, exhibitors and attendees enjoyed the stunning cultural venue of Milan - a city known as one of the renowned capitals of fashion and design in the world.

The Newspapers Section met twice during the IFLA conference to review past achievements and discuss plans for future meetings including next year's conference session to be held in Gothenburg, Sweden.   Hartmut Walravens presided as chair of the Section as Edmund King served as secretary. The twelve-member committee present at the 22 August meeting reflected on the success of the Section's spring 2009 conference held in Mozhaisk, a town in Moscow Oblast, Russia.  Upwards of 50 delegates attended and heard papers on the challenges of legal deposit of digital-born newspapers for libraries.  Papers presented at Mozhaisk are slated to be published in English and Russian in an upcoming IFLA Saur series in 2009/10. 

The Section's Satellite meeting held at the Royal Library, Stockholm only days before the IFLA Conference was declared a success as 80 attendees met to hear papers on the theme of harvesting, archiving, presenting today's digitally-produced newspapers.  

Four papers were accepted for the Section's IFLA Conference Open Programme on 24 August - two from Italy, one from UK and another from the USA.  Each speaker presented on topics related to "Newspapers in the Mediterranean and the Evolution of the Modern State." 

The Section members discussed two upcoming conferences - the spring 2010 business meeting and conference to be held at the Indira Ghandi National Centre for the Arts, New Delhi and the Section's Open Programme session for the 76th IFLA General Conference to be held in Sweden.  The New Delhi conference theme will be "Digital Preservation and Access to News and Views" while the suggested topics for the Open Programme centered on relations between publishers, standards, organizations, and libraries.  See http://www.ignca.nic.in/ifla2010/ifla2010.htm for more information on the New Delhi Conference including the call for paper submission deadlines, tentative program schedule, registration, hotel accommodations, and much more.

Other agenda topics of the Section’s 22 August business meeting included the election of officers.  Frederick Zarndt, Planman Consulting Inc., Coronado CA, USA was elected chairman; Par Nilsson from the National Library of Sweden was elected Secretary/Treasurer; and Christoph Albers from the Berlin State Library was elected as Information Coordinator/Web-Editor.   Currently the Newspapers Section membership totals 33 institutional members and three personal members.   There is a possibility that the Section's August 2011 Satellite meeting will be held in the United States as a joint meeting with National Digital Newspaper Program participants.

For much more information on the IFLA Newspapers Section see http://www.ifla.org/en/about-the-newspapers-section or visit the group's newly developed Facebook page.

More...

Online Doc Classification and Indexing Section Report by David Miller and Edward T. O'Neill

by Sai Deng on Fri, Jan 15, 2010 at 09:50 am

IFLA Classification and Indexing Section Report

David Miller, Curry College

Edward T. O’Neill, OCLC Research

IFLA Classification and Indexing Section Report

David Miller, Curry College

Edward T. O’Neill, OCLC Research

The Classification and Indexing Section Standing Committee held its customary two meetings at the 75th IFLA World Library and Information Congress in Milan, Italy. This was the first WLIC to adopt a shortened schedule, reduced by one day. In consequence, the second SC meeting was held during the Congress , as compared with the previous practice of holding the second meeting the day after the Congress. Jo-Anne Bélair (Bibliothèque de l'Université Laval, Québec) and Magdalena Svanberg (National Library of Sweden) were elected Chair and Secretary, respectively. Patrice Landry (Swiss National Library) and Leda Bultrini (ARPA Lazio, Rome) were thanked with deep appreciation for their work as former Chair and Secretary. The SC welcomed new members Thierry Bouchet (Bibliothèque nationale de France), Giuseppe Buizza (Bibloteca Queriniana, Brescia, Italy), Lynne Howarth (University of Toronto), Sandra Roe (Illinois State University), Jagtar Singh (Punjabi University, India), and Maja Žumer (University of Ljubljana, Slovenia).

The Classification and Indexing Section held a Satellite Meeting (or preconference) titled “Looking at the Past and Preparing for the Future” in Milan on August 20-21, co-sponsored by the Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale di Firenze. About fifty people attended the Satellite Meeting, fewer than were hoped for, but ultimately an acceptable number of attendees, considering the global economic crisis. Those in attendance participated actively in discussions, and agreed that the technical and logistical support for the meeting was quite good. It had been eight years since the previous Section satellite meeting, at OCLC in Dublin, Ohio, and the SC feels that the Section should not wait for this many years to pass before organizing the next one.

The Section’s main program in Milan was titled “Foundations to build future subject access”.  Two papers were presented: “Introducing FRSAD and Mapping with SKOS and other models”, prepared by Marcia Zeng (Kent State University) and Maja Žumer, “Subject indexing in Italy: recent advances and future perspectives”, by Anna Lucarelli, Federica Paradisi (Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale di Firenze, Florence, Italy) and Alberto Cheti (Research Group on Subject Indexing of the Italian Library (GRIS), Italy). Both papers are posted on the Congress website, accompanied by translations in Arabic, French, German, Russian and Spanish (http://www.ifla.org/annual-conference/ifla75/programme2009-en.php#thursday, Session 200). Although the program had been planned to include three papers, the extra time available for discussion was welcome.

The Working Group on Functional Requirements for Subject Authority Records (FRSAR) held three meeting in Milan: while all were open to visitors, the third was specifically publicized as intended for open discussion. The first draft of FRSAR available for public comment was made available earlier in the summer. The deadline for public comments had passed prior to the Milan Congress, and in consequence, there was a great deal for the WG to discuss and prioritize. The FRSAR draft and other documents is available at http://www.ifla.org/en/node/1297.

The Working Group on Guidelines for Subject Access by National Bibliographic Agencies has had difficulty sustaining its work in recent years. Nevertheless, SC members agreed that the change of this WG is important and that it should be renewed. Yvonne Jahns (Deutsche Nationalbibliothek) agreed to chair this WG, and the group met once during the Congress to chart its course. Its page, with contract information is available at http://www.ifla.org/en/node/1707.

IFLA has a new divisional structure, somewhat simplified, from eight former Divisions to five at present. In consequence, this was the final year for Division IV, Bibliographic Control. The four Bibliographic Control sections– Cataloguing, Classification &Indexing, Bibliography, and Knowledge Management – are now absorbed into the new and larger Division III, Library Services. Additionally, the IFLA Core Activity “IFLA-CDNL Alliance for Bibliographic Standards (ICABS)” is now renamed “IFLA-CDNL Alliance for Digital Strategies (ICADS),” with a correspondingly different focus. This has led to some concern that, in the new IFLA organization, there is no clear focal point for bibliographic control and standards. Standing Committee members discussed the need for ensuring that our concerns continue to have an appropriate voice within IFLA and potential strategies for achieving this.

The Classification and Indexing Section’s home page is located at http://www.ifla.org/en/classification-and-indexing.

More...

Online Doc Cataloguing Section Report by William Garrison and John Hostage

by Sai Deng on Fri, Jan 15, 2010 at 09:47 am

William Garrison, University of South Florida

Anders Cato of the National Library of Sweden was reelected as chair of the Cataloguing Section and led the activities of the Cataloguing Section during the August 2009 at the World Library and Information Congress in Milan, Italy.  Bill Garrison of the University of South Florida continues to serve as newsletter editor, and John Hostage of Harvard Law School as information coordinator.  Ulrike Junger from the Deutsche Nationalbibliothek was elected secretary replacing Ben Gu of the National Library of China.

William Garrison, University of South Florida

Anders Cato of the National Library of Sweden was reelected as chair of the Cataloguing Section and led the activities of the Cataloguing Section during the August 2009 at the World Library and Information Congress in Milan, Italy.  Bill Garrison of the University of South Florida continues to serve as newsletter editor, and John Hostage of Harvard Law School as information coordinator.  Ulrike Junger from the Deutsche Nationalbibliothek was elected secretary replacing Ben Gu of the National Library of China.

In the restructuring of the IFLA divisions and sections, the Cataloguing Section is now part of Division III, Library Services.  Division IV, Bibliographic Control no longer exists, and the new Division IV has been renamed Support of the Profession.  As a result, the members of former Division IV have expressed concerns about the role that IFLA will have in the continuing development of and support for bibliographic standards.  A document expressing the concerns will be submitted to the IFLA Professional Committee for consideration.

During the conference there was a great deal of discussion about the journal, International Cataloguing and Bibliographic Control (ICBC).  The journal is in danger of being discontinued because the fiscal model in place is not sustainable.  Possibilities discussed include a) starting a new journal with a new title and new content, b) publishing the existing journal electronically only, c) publishing the existing journal in both electronic and some print format, and d) allowing the journal to cease publication completely.  Patrice Landry from the Swiss National Library is leading the effort to determine ICBC’s future.

Françoise Leresche of the Bibliothèque nationale de France reported that the draft of Anonymous Classics: African Literature: Epics and Assimilated was posted on the IFLA Website in March 2009 for international review and comments.  Anonymous Classics: Byzantine Literature is in draft form awaiting validation of entries and will be posted for worldwide review and comments in the near future.

Judy Kuhagen, Library of Congress, is coordinating the review and revision of the IFLA Cataloguing Section’s Names of Persons.  Revisions are in the process of being sent to various countries for review, correction, and contribution of new material.  The review of this publication has been slowed down because there is no machine-readable file of the 1996 edition available.  It is anticipated that the new text will be published before the next World Library and Information Congress in 2010.

Caroline Brazier of the British Library reported on the activities of the IFLA-CDNL Alliance for Digital Strategies (ICADS).  The ICADS website is now hosted by the National Library of Australia.  During the IFLA conference, ICADS hosted a day long, invitation only meeting on Digital Libraries Futures.  One of the projects being considered is mass digitization of newspapers.

Pat Riva of the Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec gave a report on the activities of the FRBR Review Group.  The FRBR Review Group is discussing the issue of whether ongoing maintenance of the Functional Requirements for Authority Data (FRAD) should be incorporated into the terms of reference for the FRBR Review Group.  The Group is not going to complete its work on examples until Area 0 in ISBD is decided and the report of the ISBD XML Study Group is completed.

The Cataloguing Section’s Programme in Milan had presentations on ISBD by Elena Escolano Rodríguez of the Biblioteca National de España, by Lynne Howarth of the University of Toronto on the ISBD Material Designation Study Group, and Mirna Willer of the University of Zadar on the ISBD/XML Schema Project.  Alberto Petrucciani of the Università degli studi di Pisa presented a paper on the new cataloguing rules in Italy, REICAT, and Massimo Gentili-Tedeschi of the Biblioteca Nazionale Braidense gave a paper on music cataloguing in Italy.  A paper on cataloging cultural objects was presented by Elisa Lanzi of Smith College, Northampton, MA, USA.  The last paper presented by Sholeh Arastoopor, Rahmatolla Fattahi and Mehri Parirohk of the Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran was on identification and categorization of works in the Persian bibliographic universe.

The next World Library and Information Congress and IFLA General Conference and Council will be held in Göteborg, Sweden 10-15 August 2010.

 

More...

Online Doc Bibliography Section Report by Glenn Patton and D. Whitney Coe

by Sai Deng on Fri, Jan 15, 2010 at 09:46 am

IFLA Bibliography Section

IFLA 2009, Milan, Italy

Report by Glenn Patton, OCLC, and D. Whitney Coe,

Princeton University Library, retired

 

IFLA Bibliography Section

IFLA 2009, Milan, Italy

Report by Glenn Patton, OCLC, and D. Whitney Coe,

Princeton University Library, retired

 

With 4,496 in attendance, the 75th IFLA World Library and Information Congress met in a very hot Milan, Italy, 23-27 August 2009, addressing the theme: "Libraries create futures: building on cultural heritage."  The Italian cultural heritage was brilliantly highlighted by a special concert at Teatro alla Scala, which featured the talents of three young opera singers from the Training and Development Department of La Scala.

 At the first business meeting of the Bibliography Section, members were informed of the reasons for the change of location of the 76th Congress from Brisbane, Australia to Goteborg, Sweden; the planning for future congresses as the contract with Congrex UK Ltd ends in 2012; the implementation of changes in the professional structure of IFLA with Division IV: Bibliographic Control merging into a larger Division III; the announcement of the publication of National Bibliographies in the Digital Age: Guidance and New Directions, which is the result of the nearly eight-year long efforts of members of the Section Working Group under the direction of Maja Zumer; the announcement of the International Bibliography Congress, 21-23 September 2010, in St. Petersburg, Russia; and the election of new officers: Carsten H. Andersen, Danish Bibliographic Centre, Ltd as Chair and Glenn Patton as Secretary.

At the section’s second business meeting, new members of the section Standing Committee were welcomed, including the newly elected ALA member, Charlene Chou, Columbia University.  The section continued its planning for participation in the international congress to be held in St. Petersburg and considered planning a satellite meeting, to be held prior to the 2011 IFLA conference, that would focus on the newly published guidelines in National Bibliographies in the Digital Age.  Members also discussed ways of increasing the section’s activities between conferences by using new technologies that are part of IFLA’s new web platform.

The Bibliography Section participated in two programs during the conference.  The first, the Section’s own program, was titled “Promoting and Preserving National Bibliographies, Our Testimony of Cultural Heritage.  Cristina Magliano presented a paper written by her colleague Gabriella Contardi titled, “The Italian National Library Service (SBN): a Cooperative Library Service Infrastructure and Bibliographic Control.”  Regina Varienne-Janssen (National Library of Lithuania) presented a paper titled, “Methodological and Organisational Aspects of Digitisation and Bibliographic Access of Cultural Heritage: the Lithuanian Approach,” which described effort in Lithuania to involve a variety of cultural heritage institutions in developing standards and procedures for preparing digital materials.  The third paper was the joint effort of Jan Pisanski and Maja Žumer of the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia, and Trond Aalberg of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology titled, “Frbrisation: towards a Bright Future for National Bibliographies.”  The paper described efforts to enhance access to national bibliographies by applying the FRBR model.  The final paper was “50 Yesar of Indian National Bibliography: a Critical Study,” prepared by Maitrayee Ghosh of the Indian Institute of Technology.  Unfortunately, Dr. Ghosh was not able to attend the conference to present her paper.  All of the papers are available on the IFLA web site at http://www.ifla.org/annual-conference/ifla75/programme2009-en.php; look for session number 77.

The Section also participated in the program sponsored the IFLA Division of Bibliographic Control titled “New Bibliographic Control Principles and Guidelines.”   The program featured four new IFLA publications:  IFLA Cataloguing Principles, the Bibliography Section’s National Bibliographies in the Digital Age, Functional Requirements for Authority Data, and Guidelines for Multilingual Thesauri.  Because of the IFLA reorganizational restructuring mentioned earlier, this was the final program to be presented by Division IV.  Papers are available on the IFLA web site at http://www.ifla.org/annual-conference/ifla75/programme2009-en.php#thursday; look for session 215.

More information about the Milan conference can be found in the issues of IFLA Express 2009 published during the conference (http://www.ifla.org/annual-conference/ifla75/ifla-express2009.htm).

Future IFLA meetings are now planned as follows:

2010 – Gothenberg, Sweden, August 10-15, 2010

2011 – San Juan, Puerto Rico, August 13-18, 2011

2012 – Helsinki, Finland (dates to be announced)

 

A personal note from Whitney Coe: This conference marks the end of my second four-year term on the Bibliography Section.  It has been a marvelous experience working with such an accomplished group of library professionals from around the world.  There are two tangible results from my activity.  I chaired the Section's program in Seoul in 2006, which presented papers on the status of the national bibliography in Asia.  The paper of Professor Chung Yeon-Kyoung, "National bibliographies: Past, present and future - the Korean experience" was later published in the IFLA journal, 33(3), 2007, 220-228.  Finally, as a member of the IFLA Working Group on Guidelines for National Bibliographies, I am pleased to see the publication of "National Bibliographies in the Digital Age: Guidance and New Directions.  Edited by Maja Zumer.  Munchen: K.G.Saur, 2009."  I thank ALA and ALCTS for giving me this opportunity.

More...

Pages

To lead and coordinate ALCTS international relations activities and the division’s communication regarding those activities. To engage in outreach activities with counterpart groups of librarians abroad, and to develop and implement international library collections and technical services programs, meetings, educational activities, and publications recommended by the ALA/IRC and the ALCTS Board. To advise the ALCTS Board on international issues related to library collections, technical services, and standards in those areas....

Subscribe to ALCTS International Relations Committee (Association for Library Collections & Technical Services)