Distance Learning Section Discussion Group (ACRL DLS) Community

In: ACRL Discussion and Interest Groups (Association of College & Research Libraries), Distance Learning
30 members  |  About this group  |   Syndicate content
View:   Faces | List

Event DLS Discussion Group at Midwinter

by Jill Hallam-Miller on Fri, Jan 17, 2014 at 01:16 pm

Join the Distance Learning Section’s discussion group for a lively discussion on topics including the most effective ways/ideas/strategies to market library services and collections to distance/online students; how to make your webpage and research guides more effective;  and new ideas for meeting the needs of distance learners.  If you have a question, idea, or topic, please join us for informative and interesting discussion.  

http://alamw14.ala.org/node/12423
Location: Pennsylvania Convention Center 115A

Join the Distance Learning Section’s discussion group for a lively discussion on topics including the most effective ways/ideas/strategies to market library services and collections to distance/online students; how to make your webpage and research guides more effective;  and new ideas for meeting the needs of distance learners.  If you have a question, idea, or topic, please join us for informative and interesting discussion.  

http://alamw14.ala.org/node/12423
Location: Pennsylvania Convention Center 115A

Let us see what you’re doing! Bring screen shots, a printout, or a URL. We’ll compile the examples and links and post them to the DLS Discussion Group’s ALA Connect page for all to see after Midwinter.

Need some reading material for your trip into Philadelphia? Try one of the articles below that addresses the discussion topics:

Adams, K., & Cassner, M. (2000). Marketing library resources and services to distance faculty. Retrieved from Faculty Publications, UNL Libraries http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libraryscience/77/  

Bonnand, S., & Hansen, M. A. (2012). From Two Dot to Turkey: Reaching online library users via web conferencing. Urban Library Journal, 18(1). Retrieved from http://ojs.cunylibraries.org/index.php/ulj/article/view/70/pdf

Doucet Rand, A. (2013). A model for designing library instruction for distance learning. Journal of Library & Information Services in Distance Learning, 7(1-2), 84-92. doi: 10.1080/1533290X.2012.705570 (open access beginning 1/21/14)

Hill, J. B., Li, Hongyu, & Macheak, C. (2013). Current practices in distance learning library services as urban and metropolitan universities. Journal of Library & Information Services in Distance Learning, 7(3), 313-322. doi: 10.1080/1533290X.2012.732550 (open access beginning 1/21/14)

 

More...

Discussion Join the Discussion Group for an Online Discussion: Assessment in the Online Environment

by Jill Hallam-Miller on Mon, Jul 8, 2013 at 01:23 pm

Please join ACRL’s Distance Learning Section Discussion Group for a lively online discussion about assessing information literacy and student learning in online environments!

The discussion will take place on Friday, July 19th at 1pm EDT.
Register at http://tinyurl.com/DLSdiscussion

Membership is not a requirement! This discussion is open to all interested parties.

Please join ACRL’s Distance Learning Section Discussion Group for a lively online discussion about assessing information literacy and student learning in online environments!

The discussion will take place on Friday, July 19th at 1pm EDT.
Register at http://tinyurl.com/DLSdiscussion

Membership is not a requirement! This discussion is open to all interested parties.

We’ll consider how assessment can be used to show library value, how to approach faculty and administration to get a foot in the door with embedding assessments, and whether librarians should be doing assessment at all!

Please spread the word and share the registration link.

More...

Online Doc ACRL DLS Discussion Group - Annual Conference Discussion Notes

by Jill Hallam-Miller on Mon, Jul 8, 2013 at 09:33 am

Attached are the notes from the discussion group's June 30th discussion, held in the Wabash Room at the Palmer House Hotel in Chicago from 1:00-2:30pm.

The notes include links to resources mentioned during the discussion.

In addition, you can access the Discussion Group's Online Instruction Assessment Bibliography at http://bit.ly/DLS-Bib

Please stay tuned for upcoming information on how to join the continuing discussion during our WebEx session, hosted by UMUC Libraries, on July 19th at 1pm EDT!

Discussion DLS Discussion Group at Annual 2013

by Jill Hallam-Miller on Wed, Jun 12, 2013 at 11:15 am

DLS Discussion Group @ Annual 2013

When: Sunday, June 30, 2013, 1:00-2:30pm

DLS Discussion Group @ Annual 2013

When: Sunday, June 30, 2013, 1:00-2:30pm

Where: Palmer House Hilton, Wabash Room

Join the Distance Learning Section for a continuation of the discussion and comment period that concluded the Saturday DLS program ("Is It Worth It? Assessing Online Instruction." http://ala13.ala.org/node/10053) on the topic of assessing online instruction. This session begins with a brief award ceremony. Refreshments will be provided.

 A supplemental reading bibliography is available at http://bit.ly/DLS-Bib

 Add the meeting to your schedule: http://ala13.ala.org/node/10620

More...

File ALA-2013-MidWinter-ACRL-DLS-meeting-summary-1-27-2013

by Jill Hallam-Miller on Thu, May 23, 2013 at 07:30 am

DOCX File, 16.85 KB

Discussion DLS Discussion Group at Midwinter 2013

by Jill Hallam-Miller on Tue, Dec 18, 2012 at 02:47 pm

Midwinter Discussion...

When: Sun, Jan 27, 2013 10:30-11:30am

Where: Westin Seattle Hotel-St. Helens

Is the concept of a distance librarian passe? Does spatial proximity to a library matter for students? Should all subject matter experts be considered distance librarians? As more and more on-campus students experience the library in the same manner as distance students, we should rethink the models we use to meet the needs of students who only use our online services. We invite you to share your observations, concerns and creative solutions!  

Discussion Annual 2012 Discussion Group - Assessment

by Darcy Del Bosque on Fri, Jun 29, 2012 at 04:28 pm

The topic for this year’s Discussion group meeting was assessment.  Participants shared what is currently done with assessment at their institutions which varied widely; from a three to five question surveys following one-shot instruction sessions to the assessment of e-portfolios using the ACRL standards.  Although many institutions had already created a culture of assessment, some were just starting to develop a plan for measuring distance learning services and/or instruction in a useful and achievable manor.

The topic for this year’s Discussion group meeting was assessment.  Participants shared what is currently done with assessment at their institutions which varied widely; from a three to five question surveys following one-shot instruction sessions to the assessment of e-portfolios using the ACRL standards.  Although many institutions had already created a culture of assessment, some were just starting to develop a plan for measuring distance learning services and/or instruction in a useful and achievable manor.

Participants discussed the purpose of assessment.  For instance, should librarians be assessing learning outcomes versus satisfaction with the instructor? What is the meaning of “learning” for librarians and how well are they suited to assess it?  Further questions were raised regarding the assessment of critical thinking, including whether it should be done at a higher university level instead of the library.  Participants were interested in finding out how to demonstrate the library’s contributions to student’s achievements.  Suggestions were: Alumni surveys (for contribution to lifelong learning), five year reviews, curriculum mapping, and information literacy being incorporated into institutional goals.  One participant cautioned that people should remember that what you measure may not be what is most important to patrons.   She felt it was important to allow for open-ended questioning to discover areas where you can improve services, as opposed to always trying to get patrons to pinpoint what they want from the Libraries.

Several suggestions were provided for how to keep assessment data, although some still found it difficult to find a perfect product, especially one which could tie assessment to standards. Examples of where assessment data is currently stored include:

  • Excel spreadsheet
  • Wiki
  • Task stream- for 5 year reviews
  • Program Assessment using Qualtrix- Use learning outcomes mapped to ACRL standards.  Informal approach using sampling.

Participants also discussed what to do with results.  The emphasis was on closing the loop and showing that changes have been made based on data that has been collected. One participant suggested creating a time line and identifying five things to respond to regarding the assessment data. Another recommended getting feedback from faculty to see if they notice an improvement in students who have received formal library training.  One person mentioned that success can be as simple as students remembering your name or providing a comment on your LibGuide.

For more information about assessment for distance education in libraries attend the DLS program at ALA annual in 2013 and see the following three presentations from this year’s Distance Library Services Conference

  • Listen to What They Have to Say! Assessing Distance Learners’ Satisfaction with Library Services Using a Transactional Survey
    Michael Alewine
    University of North Carolina – Pembroke
  • Aided and Embedded: The Team Approach to Instructional Design
    Leslee Shell, Steven Crawford, Patricia Harris
    Arizona State University
  • In it for the Long Haul: Lessons from a Decade of Assessment
    Susan E. Searing
    University of Illinois

 

More...

Event Distance Learning Section Discussion Group

by ALAConnect Helpdesk (staff) on Sat, Jun 9, 2012 at 01:07 am

Timezone:
US/Pacific (-7)

Opportunity for distance librarians to discuss trends and research related to our special populations of students and faculty.

More information about this conference session

Online Doc DLS DG Notes from ALA Midwinter 2012

by Jason Coleman on Tue, Feb 14, 2012 at 04:57 pm


ACRL’s Distance Learning Section’s Discussion Group


ALA Midwinter 2012, Sunday, Jan. 22, 2012, 10:30-Noon

Notes from the discussion

I.  Visit from candidates running for ACRL Vice-President


ACRL’s Distance Learning Section’s Discussion Group


ALA Midwinter 2012, Sunday, Jan. 22, 2012, 10:30-Noon

Notes from the discussion

I.  Visit from candidates running for ACRL Vice-President

Debbie Malone and Trevor Dawes each spoke briefly about what they would strive to accomplish should they be elected Vice-President of ACRL. (Note: I had difficulty hearing the candidates and, therefore, did not endeavor to take notes about the content of their talks).

II. Announcements

  1. Bryna Coonin, one of the members of the editorial board of Internet Reference Services Quarterly, announced that the journal has a column that would be an ideal forum for sharing ideas and information about how the Internet can be used to deliver reference services to distance patrons. She stated that although the column is not peer-reviewed, it has the benefit of a quick turn-around time from submission to publication.

  1. Cynthia Porter, Chair of DLS’ Discussion Group, announced that she is planning to continue today’s discussion virtually and would also like the group to have additional discussions virtually. She asked the group for ideas about what platform would work best for these discussions. She mentioned several possibilities: (1) ALA Connect, (2) Facebook, (3) a listserv dedicated to these discussions - similar to what the ALCTS e-forum does (two day discussions with summaries at the end of each day).
    • Several attendees suggested using OFFCAMP-L for these discussions
    • Cynthia said that we will try it and see how it goes.

    III.  Discussion: “What ILL services are we providing and how are we getting the word out about these services”

    • Cynthia began the discussion by mentioning that one of the members of the DLS DG works at a library that is just starting an ILL program. . That person has said that it is hard to get the word out about the ILL program and is curious to know what others are doing to get the word out. That person’s library mails articles but not books. For books they recommend that the patron go to a local library.

    • Angela Whitehurst described Eastern Carolina University’s ILL service
      • They use ILLiad.
      • They ship materials via 2 day UPS ground and pay for both sending and returning. They only ship to addresses outside the county. They will even ship overseas. They try to ship whatever is needed.
      • They treat anything from their library as document delivery.
      • They use the same ILLiad forms for traditional ILL and for document delivery. They have customized ILLiad so that one of the patron types is distance education student. Those patrons can select DE delivery for books.
      • There return rate for shipped materials is good.
      • If someone requests something that the library wants to add to the collection, they purchase it through Amazon.

    • Question: “When we specify that a patron must be a distance patron, what do we mean? How do we determine if a patron is a distance patron?”

    •  
      • A participant recommended making it as easy as possible and allowing anyone to say they are a distance patron.
      • Mark de Jong from UMUC mentioned that some consortia have policies that restrict shipping to individuals who do not meet a particular definition of “distance.”
      • A participant noted that it can be very difficult to determine who is a distance patron since there are now so many hybrid classes (part in-person, part online) and so many people enrolled in continuing education programs but taking classes on campus.
      • Ellen Neuhaus from the University of Northern Iowa noted that they allow students to register as a continuing scholar when they are ABD. They pay a low fee and continue to use distance learning ILL services.

    • Question: “How can libraries cope with the costs of shipping materials to distance patrons?”

    •  
      • Mark de Jong from UMUC stated that most lending libraries do not like to directly deliver their materials to patrons. They prefer shipping to the borrowing library first and then having the library send to the patron. Thus, it can be quite costly to provide delivery services to distance patrons. He recommends that libraries analyze these costs and purchase materials for patrons to keep permanently (e.g., via Amazon) when doing so would save the library money.
      • Angela Whitehurst noted that ECU examined the cost of shipping books to distance patrons and found that they spent ~$7,000 to ship and return 800 books.
      • A participant recommended that libraries establish reciprocal lending arrangements so students can use whatever library they are near.
      • A participant and Mark de Jong  mentioned that their ILL request system allows patrons to request book chapters. The library scans these and delivers them as they do electronic articles.
      • Stephanie Buck from Oregon State University mentioned that they have purchased an e-book (via e-campus) for a distance student in Cameroon rather than pay to ship the print copy they own.
      • Mark de Jong from UMUC stated that he had his tech guy create its own DRM protection tools so his library can deal directly with publishers rather than go through an intermediate service like Overdrive. It took his tech guy 6 weeks to do this.
      • Mark de Jong from UMUC recommends that libraries look for consortial discounts with UPS and FedEx. He helped the entire state of Maryland negotiate a contract with a discounted rate.

    • Question: “Who is doing patron driven acquistion?”

    •  
      • Rosalind Tedford from Wake Forest University stated that they are doing PDA. They purchase an item after the 5th use. Nothing under 5 minutes counts as a use. She said that this has not bankrupted them. She is not sure whether or not it has reduced the number of ILL requests.
      • A participant suggested that libraries immediately trigger a purchase of a PDA book when an ILL request is made for it.

    • Cynthia Porter posed a question, “What are we doing to advertise ILL services?”

    •  
      • Stephanie Buck from OSU stated that many students do not want anything but immediate full text. She stated that attempts to get the word out about ILL are not always effective. She recommends going through advisors.
      • Lorna Newman from the University of Cincinnati stated that they are trying to figure out how to identify which students are distance students so they can promote services to them.
      • A participant suggested posting information about ILL services inside Learning Management Systems such as Blackboard.
      • Rosalind Tedford from Wake Forest University suggested providing an orientation for distance education students and promoting ILL services during the orientation.
      • Anne Marie Short from Shawnee State University recommended developing a Libguide specifically for distance learners.

    • A participant stated that their campus does not understand that some students never come to campus. The campus requires that anyone needing to change a password come to campus to do so.

    •  
      • Mark de Jong from UMUC stated that their students get virtual IDs which can be printed via PeopleSoft. He had to inform Maryland’s council of library directors that this was being offered so that other libraries would honor these printed IDs.
      • Angela Whitehurst from ECU stated that students at ECU can use any of 16 libraries in North Carolina. The students are allowed to print ID cards, but some of the other universities would not honor the cards. She noted that the cards must look official to be accepted by other libraries.

    • Stephanie Buck from OSU asked “How do we let students know about our awesome services?”
      • Stephanie noted that OSU holds webinars via Adobe Connect to explain everything the distance students need to know. These webinars last 1.5 hours. She also provides 4 additional, more in-depth webinars. She promotes the webinars through instructors, advisors, and their e-campus newsletter. Some instructors are requiring that students attend a webinar. She is recording the webinars. She lets all the students know it is being recorded and makes all of them acknowledge that they understand it will be shared. She provides the recording to everyone who signs up for the webinar. She recommends these webinars because students pose questions that she can answer to the benefit of all the attendees.
      • A participant asked if it is better to use webinars or libguides.
        • A participant answered that it is good to use both.
      • A participant asked Stephanie if her promotional efforts have boosted the number of interactions or ILL requests?
        • Stephanie replied that she doesn’t think it has very much.
        • Several others indicated that they suspect it probably increases students’ willingness to use library services.

    • Mark de Jong from UMUC stated that UMUC switched the entire Undergraduate curriculum to 8 week terms. This switch was motivated by the schedule of the military. Because of this, a matter of days becomes critical. With 8 week terms downloadable books become vital. They use ebrary and EBL. The average length of time it takes to deliver articles via ILL is very short.

    • Stephanie Buck from OSU asked “How can we help students in other countries?”

    •  
      • Mark de Jong from UMUC recommends purchasing the books they request for them rather than spend money shipping materials back and forth.

    • Cynthia Porter from A.T. Still University stated that she is embedded in classes. She tells students to e-mail her if they can’t get an article. She then submits the request via Docline on their behalf.

    •  
      • A participant asked if this can be done in ILLiad.
        • A participant answered that the law requires that users are notified of copyright restrictions.

    • Jason Coleman from Kansas State University asked, “How are you all handling requests for textbooks?”

    •  
      • A participant said that they would like to lend them, but the problem is that students often do not return them.
      • A participant said that NC State buys one copy of every textbook for the libraries.
      • Mark de Jong from UMUC said that they have imported the textbook list into their ILL system so that whenever someone requests a textbook they (UMUC libraries) will know.  They tell the students that they will not lend textbooks. If the students want it and are not using it as a textbook, they do lend it. It is on the honor system.
      • A participant asked if faculty are getting around the textbook problem by using e-reserves.
        • A participant mentioned that the Copyright Clearance Center has an option for putting a book on e-reserve.
        • Rosalind Tedford from Wake Forest University said that they contact the professor if they request that a book be put on e-reserve and the copyright fees exceed a certain amount.

    • Question: “Does anyone track how much their e-reserves are used?”
      • A participant said that the ARES e-reserves management system tracks how much e-reserves are used.
      • A participant said that to avoid e-reserves fees we should teach faculty and students how to get to the item without putting it on reserves.
      • A participant said they won’t put locally owned items into e-reserves.
      • A participant said they tell faculty that they will put up to 5 articles on e-reserve and that if they want more, she will teach the students how to search for articles.
      • Cynthia Porter from A.T. Still University said that they ask their faculty to pay for the copyright clearance fees required for e-reserves.
      • Mark de Jong from UMUC recommends that all libraries create in advance a legal defense they can use if they are ever taken to court over copyright issues.

    IV.  Ideas for discussion topic for ALA Annual

    • Cynthia Porter asked for suggestions for the discussion topic at ALA Annual. Suggestions included:
      • Staffing reference for distance education
      • Assessment for online instruction
      • Mobile sites
      • Webscale Discovery
      • Creative funding
      • Role of liaison librarians in supporting distance learners

Notes submitted by Jason Coleman

More...

Poll What do you prefer? E-mail attachment? Or link to a document?

by Cynthia Porter on Thu, Feb 9, 2012 at 12:52 pm
Link to document
0% (0 votes)
E-mail attachment
100% (1 vote)
Total votes: 1

Pages

Selects topic(s) for and leads the discussion group at annual and midwinter conferences. Goals are to inform attendees and promote sharing of expertise and ideas.

Subscribe to Distance Learning Section Discussion Group (ACRL DLS)