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Discussion IFC January Virtual Meeting - Recording & Meeting Minutes

by Eleanor Diaz (staff) on Mon, Jan 8, 2018 at 11:33 am

Hello IFCers, 

Here is the recording from last week's virtual meeting: ala.adobeconnect.com/prykgfe5kllg/. Attached are the meeting minutes. Please let me know if there are any corrections.

Discussion IFC January Adobe Connect Meeting - Agenda & Documents

by Eleanor Diaz (staff) on Wed, Dec 27, 2017 at 11:05 am

Hello IFCers, 

Below is the agenda for the IFC virtual meeting, scheduled for Jan. 5 from 2-3:30 p.m. Central. Attached to this post are the documents that will be discussed during the virtual meeting. If you aren't able to make it, meeting minutes and a recording will be emailed and posted to ALA Connect. Thanks! 


 

Intellectual Freedom Committee

Adobe Connect Virtual Meeting Agenda

Jan. 5, 2018, 2-3:30 p.m. Central

 

Introductions

Hello IFCers, 

Below is the agenda for the IFC virtual meeting, scheduled for Jan. 5 from 2-3:30 p.m. Central. Attached to this post are the documents that will be discussed during the virtual meeting. If you aren't able to make it, meeting minutes and a recording will be emailed and posted to ALA Connect. Thanks! 


 

Intellectual Freedom Committee

Adobe Connect Virtual Meeting Agenda

Jan. 5, 2018, 2-3:30 p.m. Central

 

Introductions

  • Welcome from IFC chair and round robin of attendees 

OIF Updates

  • Director update (Jamie LaRue)
  • Public challenges review (Kristin Pekoll)
    • “Public Challenges Oct. 20 – Dec. 20”
    • Please send questions about specific challenges to kpekoll@ala.org.
  • Privacy and legislation update (Deborah Caldwell-Stone, Bill Marden)

Midwinter Conference 2018

Annual Conference 2018

  • IFC vote on co-sponsorship of AFL-CIO/ALA Labor Committee program
    • “Can I Lose My Job For That? Intellectual Freedom and Employee Protections in the Library Workplace”
    • Recap on IFC program for Annual (Robert Hubsher, Emily Knox)

Liaison Updates

Reports/Updates from Working Groups

  • Net Neutrality Position Paper (Keila Zayas-Ruiz, Johana Orellana)
  • Social Media Guidelines (Teresa Doherty, Sarah Thornbery)
  • Visual and Performing Arts Interpretation (Jo Rolfe)
  • Disinvited Speakers/Authors Q&A (Peter Coyl, Sukrit Goswami)
  • IF Modules with PLA/IFC (Cindy Gibbon, Brooke Sheets)
  • Library Services and Inclusion Issues for People with Disabilities Interpretation (Ray James)
  • Selection & Reconsideration Policy Toolkit (Helen Adams)

Final Comments

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Discussion Feedback Wanted: Library Bill of Rights Interpretation Draft - Visual and Performing Arts

by Eleanor Diaz (staff) on Tue, Nov 28, 2017 at 01:34 pm

The Intellectual Freedom Committee would appreciate feedback on this Library Bill of Rights interpretation draft, “Visual and Performing Arts.” Please respond with your suggestions by Friday, December 15. There are two ways to respond:

The Intellectual Freedom Committee would appreciate feedback on this Library Bill of Rights interpretation draft, “Visual and Performing Arts.” Please respond with your suggestions by Friday, December 15. There are two ways to respond:

  • Use this Google doc to post your comments. The IFC requests that you ONLY post comments on this document, and not edit the document directly. It also requests that you share the link to this Google doc draft with only the ALA community. To post a comment, select “Insert” in the top menu, and then click “Comment.” Comments may be posted anonymously (if you’re not signed into a Google account) or publicly (if you’re signed into your Google account).
  • Post suggestions to this ALA Connect post, either as a comment or by attaching a “track changes” version of the Word document draft.

The Intellectual Freedom Committee will revise the draft interpretation in light of your suggestions and may bring it to Council forum at the upcoming Midwinter Conference. Please distribute the draft interpretation as widely as possible to others for their input.

Thank you, 

IFC Chair Helen Adams

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Discussion Annual Conference 2017 Meeting Minutes & Report to Council

by Eleanor Diaz (staff) on Wed, Jul 5, 2017 at 06:45 pm

Attached are the meeting minutes and the Report to Council from ALA Annual Conference in Chicago.

Discussion DRAFT: Library Bill of Rights Interpretation - Equity, Diversity, Inclusion

by Eleanor Diaz (staff) on Tue, Feb 21, 2017 at 12:57 pm

This is a draft interpretation that attempts to demonstrate how equity, diversity and inclusion are integral to the principles expressed in the Library Bill of Rights. Please share this draft widely. We appreciate any and all feedback on this draft document.

Discussion Draft of a new "Politics in Libraries Interpretation" of the Library Bill of Rights

by Doug Archer on Mon, Feb 20, 2017 at 01:18 pm

Colleagues,

Here is a draft copy of a new "Politics in Libraries Interpretation" of the Library Bill of Rights.  The IFC would greatly appreciate your observations and suggestions as it prepares the document for consideration at ALA's Annual Meeting this summer in Chicago.  Please send in your comments using Connect by Friday, March 21.  Our hope is to incorporate suggestions as appropriate and distribute a revised version of this draft before Annual for further input.

Best wishes,

Doug

 

Discussion DRAFT: Library Bill of Rights Interpretation - Visual and Performing Arts

by John Mack Freeman on Fri, Feb 17, 2017 at 12:37 pm

This is the draft interpretation for the Library Bill of Rights as it relates to visual and performing arts. Please share widely, and we appreciate any and all feedback on this document.

Discussion Midwinter 2017 - IFC-Reviewed Documents

by Eleanor Diaz (staff) on Sun, Jan 22, 2017 at 07:15 pm

Attached are the IFC-reviewed documents with edits:

- Diversity Interpretation (clean copy and "track changes" copy)

- Politics Interpretation (clean copy and "track changes" copy) 

- Resolution on Access to Accurate Information (clean copy) 

 

Clean copies of the documents will be available at tomorrow's meeting. 

Thanks! 

Ellie 

Discussion Midwinter 2017 IFC Agenda and Exhibits

by Eleanor Diaz (staff) on Sat, Jan 21, 2017 at 06:33 pm

ALA INTELLECTUAL FREEDOM COMMITTEE

ALA INTELLECTUAL FREEDOM COMMITTEE
2017 MIDWINTER MEETING
ATLANTA, GA

 

SCHEDULE

 

Saturday, January 21

8 a.m. – 10 a.m. Business Meeting I — GWCC, B214

10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. Business Meeting II — GWCC, B214

3 p.m. – 4 p.m. Private Security and Civic Engagement: Tips from the Kansas City Public Library — GWCC, B405

 

ALA INTELLECTUAL FREEDOM COMMITTEE

ALA INTELLECTUAL FREEDOM COMMITTEE
2017 MIDWINTER MEETING
ATLANTA, GA

 

SCHEDULE

 

Saturday, January 21

8 a.m. – 10 a.m. Business Meeting I — GWCC, B214

10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. Business Meeting II — GWCC, B214

3 p.m. – 4 p.m. Private Security and Civic Engagement: Tips from the Kansas City Public Library — GWCC, B405

 

Sunday, January 22

8:30 a.m.– 9:15 a.m. IFC/COL Joint Committee Meeting — GWCC, B316

9:30 a.m. – 11 a.m. ALA Town Hall Meeting — GWCC, Thomas Murphy Ballroom 3-4

1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. Business Meeting III — GWCC, B214

3 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Business Meeting IV — GWCC, B214

 

Monday, January 23

1 p.m. – 4 p.m. Business Meeting V — GWCC, B214

 

* GWCC: Georgia World Congress Center

 

AGENDA

I. CALL TO ORDER — Pam Klipsch

II. REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF AGENDA — Pam Klipsch

III. REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF MINUTES FROM THE 2016 ANNUAL CONFERENCE IN ORLANDO, FLORIDA (Exhibit I) — Pam Klipsch

IV. REPORT FROM THE ALA EXECUTIVE BOARD — John DeSantis

V. VISITS FROM THE ALA PRESIDENTIAL CANDIATES

• Scott Walter: Saturday, Jan. 21 at 9 a.m.
• Terri Grief: Saturday, Jan. 21 at 9:30 a.m.
• Loida Garcia-Febo: Saturday, Jan. 21 at 8:15 a.m.

IV. CREATIVE CONTENT Q&A (Exhibit II) — Ray James

V. RESOLUTION ON GUN VIOLENCE (Exhibit III) — Pam Klipsch

VI. DIVERSITY INTERPRETATION (Exhibit IV) — Pam Klipsch

VII. VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS INTERPRETATION (Exhibit V) — Mack
Freeman

VIII. POLITICS IN LIBRARIES INTERPRETATION (Exhibit VI) — Doug Archer

IX. FILTERING GUIDELINES (Exhibit VII) — Mike Robinson

X. ALA POLICY B.8.9 REVISION (Exhibit VIII) — Mike Robinson

XI. REPORTS FROM IFC PRIVACY SUBCOMMITTEE — Mike Robinson and Deborah Caldwell-Stone

• Library privacy checklists (Exhibits IX – XV)

XII. REPORTS FROM THE IFC REPRESENTATIVES AND LIAISONS

• YALSA position paper — Ma’lis Wendt (Exhibit XVI)

XIII. OIF REPORT

• ALA Annual Conference remodel — James LaRue & Deborah Caldwell-Stone
• Banned Books Week 2017 graphic (Exhibit XVII) — Ellie Diaz
• Public challenges (Exhibit XVIII) — Kristin Pekoll

XIV. LEGISLATION REPORT (Exhibit XIX) — Deborah Caldwell-Stone

• State legislation

XV. ANY OTHER BUSINESS THAT MAY PROPERLY COME BEFORE THE
COMMITTEE

XVI. ADJOURNMENT

 

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Discussion Religion in American Libraries: An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights

by Nanette Perez (staff) on Mon, Apr 4, 2016 at 02:55 pm

New Draft of an Interpretation to the Library Bill of Rights.

Religion in American Libraries: An Interpretation of the

Library Bill of Rights

 

New Draft of an Interpretation to the Library Bill of Rights.

Religion in American Libraries: An Interpretation of the

Library Bill of Rights

 

The courts have consistently held that for the freedom of the press and speech guaranteed by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution to be fully meaningful, people must also have the right to receive information: that is, to read, view, hear or access what they choose, without any limitations imposed by the government. In addition, the First Amendment guarantees the right of individuals to believe and practice their religion or practice no religion at all (the “free exercise” clause) and prohibits government from establishing or endorsing a religion or religions (the “establishment” clause).  Thus the freedom of, for and from religion, are similarly guaranteed by the Constitution.

 

In most cases involving religion and libraries, these latter freedoms of, for and from religion are not at issue. Rather, the constitutional principles at stake are usually freedom of expression and the corollary freedom to access the expression of others. For instance, most challenges to materials with religious content potentially infringe on the rights of other persons to access constitutionally protected speech rather than limiting the challenger’s own beliefs or the practice of his or her own religion.

 

For the purpose of this interpretation “religion” refers to all that touches on the infinite, a supreme deity or deities or one's understanding of the ultimate meaning or purposes of life. It includes formal organized systems of belief and practice and informal individual spiritualities. It also refers to adherents of older religions, newer religions, and no religion.  While this interpretation is most clearly applicable to public libraries, it should in most cases also be appropriate for school and academic libraries. Private libraries, especially those associated with religious institutions, should apply these guidelines as appropriate in light of their institutional mission.

 

Librarians have a professional responsibility to be inclusive rather than exclusive in collection development. Libraries serve all members of their communities and within their budgetary constraints should address all information needs of all members—including their religious information needs. Collections should reflect those needs by providing access to diverse religious thought without becoming a proponent of any of them. Articles I and II of the Library Bill of Rights are clearly inclusive regarding audience (“all people of the community the library serves”) and materials (“all points of view on current and historical issues”). This includes both fiction and non-fiction materials regardless of format.

 

Collection development and materials selection should be done according to standards set forth in library policy that incorporates professional standards established in the Library Bill of Rights and Code of Ethics of the American Library Association and that are tailored to the community that the library serves. These may include but are not limited to contemporary significance or permanent value, community interest and/or demand, artistic and literary excellence, cost and format.  The policy may include a reference to the role of the library as a limited public forum providing access to the marketplace of ideas. For example, it may state that the library provides unfettered access to different points of views and ideas. Above all, collection development should be content-neutral, assuring that the library reflects a diversity of ideas including controversial or unorthodox points of view.

 

The selection, shelving and labeling of religious fiction are particularly sensitive. Nevertheless, excluding religious fiction would be a violation of the Library Bill of Rights: “Materials should not be excluded because of origin, background, or views of those contributing to their creation." Librarians should distinguish between providing access to religious fiction and the appearance of supporting or endorsing a particular religious point of view, especially if contemplating the use of religious symbols in labeling[1].  Religious content is no more or less protected than any other type of speech.  While libraries and librarians should respect the diverse religious traditions of their communities, libraries exist to serve the information needs of all users in their communities.   For additional details, see "Labeling Systems:  An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights" and the topic "Genres" in "Questions and Answers on Labeling and Ratings Systems."

 

 

Library policy should be applied equally to shelving of religious books, to storage or display of religious objects, or to access to religious Web sites as they would be to any other shelving, storage, display, or Web access.  Privileging one religious tradition over others could violate the establishment clause of the First Amendment.  Placing specific materials according to religious point of view or status within a given faith community rather than according to the cataloging system used in the library can make it difficult for users to locate such materials. It could be a violation of the Library Bill of Rights to give special treatment to a specific sacred text or object or to limit access to such a text or object. On the other hand, it is appropriate to add additional titles or versions of a text or objects to the collection to meet community needs or interest but not to remove or sequester them. The scriptures or religious materials of all religions should be treated respectfully and equitably.

If a library sets aside tables or shelves for specialized materials or purposes such as atlases, directories, college guides, dictionaries or local history, it would be appropriate to set aside shelving for scripture, as long as all scriptures are treated equally, including texts that occupy a similar status among other groups (e.g., The Humanist Manifesto II).

Regarding meeting rooms, courts have consistently held that libraries may not exclude religious groups from their meeting rooms solely because the group is religious in character or because the meeting may include religious activities. Many precedents exist for the use of public facilities (e.g., school auditoriums or park pavilions) by all types of community groups, including religious groups.  Courts that have considered the question have consistently held that libraries are limited public forums for the receipt of information. In turn libraries may designate areas within their facilities as limited public forums for use by the community for the exchange of information.  Given that no court has ever ruled that a library must exclude religious groups, the safest course of action is to provide the same access and apply the same rules of use to all community groups.  As with collections, these rules should be content-neutral and address only behavioral restrictions (time, place and manner). Consistency is crucial: all groups should be treated the same and subject to the same rules, such as rental fees, frequency restrictions, noise policies or food bans. For additional details, see “Meeting Rooms: An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights.”

 

With regard to displays, libraries are not required to open display or exhibit space to community groups. If libraries choose to open their exhibit and display space to community groups, space should be provided on an equitable basis to all groups that request it, regardless of the beliefs or affiliations of individuals or groups requesting their use. A library may wish to consider the amount of such space and its location when deciding whether to open it to community groups. Article II of the Library Bill of Rights states, “Materials should not be excluded because of the origin, background, or views of those contributing to their creation” and “Materials should not be proscribed or removed because of partisan or doctrinal disapproval.” For additional details, see “Exhibit Spaces and Bulletin Boards: An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights.”

 

If a library provides space for community groups to distribute literature to the public, religious groups should be allowed to do so on an equitable basis with all groups that use the distribution  space, regardless of the beliefs or affiliations of individuals or groups distributing such literature.  Policies covering the number of individual items of literature, the size and definition of such items and the length of time that items will be left out for distribution should be considered.

 

The religious views that patrons and employees bring with them into the library are more community relations and employment issues rather than intellectual freedom issues and are addressed in the Intellectual Freedom Committee’s “Religion in American Libraries: Questions and Answers.”

http://www.ala.org/advocacy/intfreedom/librarybill/interpretations/meeti...

 

Precisely because religion is such a sensitive and sometimes controversial concern of library users, it should be accorded the full protections promised to its myriad forms by the First Amendment of the United States Constitution and the American Library Association’s Library Bill of Rights.

  

 

 




[1] See Labeling Systems:  An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights and "Genres" under Questions and Answers on Labeling and Ratings Systems

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To recommend such steps as may be necessary to safeguard the rights of library users, libraries, and librarians, in accordance with the First Amendment to the United States Constitution and the Library Bill of Rights as adopted by the ALA Council. To work closely with the Offi ce for Intellectual Freedom and with other units and offi cers of the Association in matters touching intellectual freedom and censorship.

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