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MAGIRT Programs - Mapping the Generations Community

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File NYPL-Genealogy-and-Maps

by Louise Ratliff on Thu, Jun 29, 2017 at 10:24 am

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File CA2-ALA-presentation-Lowery

by Louise Ratliff on Thu, Jun 29, 2017 at 10:21 am

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File CA2-ALA-presentation-Lowery

by Louise Ratliff on Thu, Jun 29, 2017 at 10:21 am

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File FamilyHistoryonMap-Mattke2107-Handout

by Louise Ratliff on Thu, Jun 29, 2017 at 10:21 am

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File FamilyHistoryonMap-Mattke2107-Slides

by Louise Ratliff on Thu, Jun 29, 2017 at 10:21 am

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Discussion Maps and Family History

by Louise Ratliff on Thu, Jun 29, 2017 at 10:19 am

Genealogists are increasingly able to use digitized maps to locate places important to their family histories. At the 2017 ALA Annual Conference in Chicago, MAGIRT hosted two programs in which librarians presented the work being done at their libraries, information on how to find resources, and a tutoral on how to georeference and add information to digital images for use with free GIS websites.  

https://magirt.github.io/ALA2017/

Genealogists are increasingly able to use digitized maps to locate places important to their family histories. At the 2017 ALA Annual Conference in Chicago, MAGIRT hosted two programs in which librarians presented the work being done at their libraries, information on how to find resources, and a tutoral on how to georeference and add information to digital images for use with free GIS websites.  

https://magirt.github.io/ALA2017/

Mapping the Generations: Visualizing Family History with Maps
ALA Annual Conference, Chicago IL
Saturday, June 24, 2017

Co-sponsored by MAGIRT and RUSA-History Section 

Mapping Your Way Through Your Family History

Jen Baldwin
Data Acquisition Manager, North America
Findmypast

The pursuit of family history is much more than names and dates; without the location, we would know very little of our ancestors. Jen Baldwin will present “Mapping Your Way Through Family History” which explores the creative use of maps of all kinds in order to tell the biographical story of our ancestors, as well as lead us to additional resources and clues to further our research. Three primary categories within cartography will be used as examples: reference maps, thematic maps, and special-purpose maps and will feature a variety of online resources. Organizations such as the United States Geologic Survey (USGS), Old Maps Online, Association of Statisticians of American Religious Bodies (ASARB), the Association of Religion Data Archives (ARDA), Newspaper Map, and more will be highlighted. As more of these tools become available online, and the embedded tools continue to advance, we will discuss the distinct opportunity in today’s research to expand our use of maps in historical research.

 Brief bio, interests, etc.: Jen Baldwin is a professional genealogist, who specializes on the western states. Her research delves into occupational records, fraternal and secret societies, and over-land migration routes that brought settlement into the far reaches of the United States. She is currently the Data Acquisition Manager, North America, for Findmypast – a leading internet provider of historical records across the globe. As a writer, lecturer, and consultant, she has worked with the National Institute of Genealogical Studies, independent professionals, private archives and libraries, and more. She was a part of the research team for Genealogy Roadshow, season two, on PBS. Jen is a proud volunteer for the Federation of Genealogical Societies, serving on the Board of Directors as Education Chair, and the Larimer County Genealogical Society (CO) as the Social Media Chair. Additionally, she is the host of #genchat on Twitter, a popular crowd-sourcing and conversation venue which occurs every two weeks.

Jen Baldwin
Data Acquisition Manager, North America
151 E 1700 S, Ste 200
Provo, UT 84606
(c) 970.333.3505
jbaldwin@findmypast.com
Findmypast.com

Discovering the past by address:  Family history where your ancestors lived

Rebecca Lowery
Reference Librarian in Genealogy and Local History
Newberry Library, Chicago, IL 

Every family has a history and that history took place in a series of particular places.  In order to help genealogists understand places where their families lived, the Newberry Library's Genealogy and Local History Section created an free and openly accessible online source called ChicagoAncestors.org.  This is the second iteration of that program which I will discuss and demonstrate.  The site provides georeferenced images as well as historical documents and links to added materials to provide as broad a range of materials as possible.  Churches, streets scenes, stories of pioneer families of Chicago, and other materials are available.  In addition we have provided Resources and Articles to enhance the learning experience.  Every place has its eccentricities in its history from street renaming to moving the bodies out of town!  The extra help provided makes this easier to understand.  There are of course the usual aids such as Search Tips, FAQs, and Contact Us and we also encourage comments as well as suggestions for additional information we might include in ChicagoAncestors.  

While ChicagoAncestors is all about Chicago, the Newberry Library has an additional online source that helps family historians get a better handle on their ancestors movements across the country and through time.  The Atlas of Historical County Boundaries is a interactive online site (which is also free and openly accessible) that allows users to see and understand the change in county borders over time.  Obviously knowing which county you are seeking a family member in can affect which sources you are going to search.  This helps you see the splitting and reforming of counties across the country.  

Brief bio, interests, etc

I came to the Newberry Library after serving as Map and Data Services Librarian at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  I have a long term interest in family history, working on my extended family as well as friends' genealogies as well.  Ialso have a life long interst in maps and how to display information in maps to maximize the access of information to users.

Becky Lowery    

Reference Librarian    
Newberry Library  
60 W. Walton Street, Chicago, IL 60610  
www.newberry.org 

Genealogy and Maps: Digital Initiatives at New York Public Library 

Philip Sutton
Librarian
New York Public Library 

This presentation will discuss how genealogists use cartographic collections at New York Public Library, and how the Library is working to create new digital tools that foster genealogy research by making maps - and the data they contain - more accessible.  

New York Public Library’s Lionel Pincus and Princess Firyal Map Division collections are national and international in scope, and comprise 433,000 maps and 20,000 books and atlases, an invaluable resource for genealogists the world over. Holdings include: 

  • Topographical maps that describe where our ancestors lived, the names of settlements, towns and cities, the effect of the landscape on the migration routes our ancestors took, the kinds of work they did, and the location of cultural features, including churches, cemeteries, fence lines, boundaries, and buildings.
  • Fire insurance maps that help genealogists find records associated with historical property addresses, churches and cemeteries, hospitals, and courts: records that help prove lineage. Fire insurance maps also describe the neighborhoods where our ancestors lived, the location of schools, libraries, theaters and cinemas, and places of business, information that helps a genealogist develop narratives. 
  • Historical maps that describe political and electoral boundaries, including wards and census enumeration districts; the location of piers and other sites of immigration; routes of transatlantic steamships, subways, canals, roads, and railroads; real estate for sale, and property ownership. 

In recent years the Library has digitized 20,000 of these kinds of cartographic works, and made them available free online. Researchers can view and download hi-res images of maps using the NYPL Digital Collections portal; search, warp and download spatial asset files using NYPL Map Warper, and help extract, correct and analyze data from historical maps using the Building Inspector app. 

 All of this culminates with the Knight Foundation funded, NYC Space/Time Directory a tool that will make urban history accessible through a set of resources including: a searchable atlas of New York past, an historical location directory and geocoder, a set of APIs and data sets, and a discovery tool linking NYPL collections together in an historical and geographic context. Maps will be used to link to historical photographs of New York City, to city directories, and other records of infinite use to genealogists. 

Brief bio, interests, etc.

Philip Sutton is a reference librarian at New York Public Library's Irma and Paul Milstein Division of United States History, Local History, and Genealogy, where he also teaches and writes about genealogy and building history research. Sutton has a BA (Hons.) from Goldsmiths College, London, a Master's Degree (MSLIS) from the Pratt Institute, and a Certificate in Genealogical Research from Boston University. He regularly presents on the topic of genealogy research at New York Public Library, and was a speaker at the New York State Family History Conference in 2013 and 2016.

 
Georeferencing Historical Maps: A Tutorial

Ryan Mattke
Map & Geospatial Information Librarian
University of Minnesota

This session will demonstrate how to georeference an historical map using freely available tools, how to bring it into different mapping interfaces, and how to add locations (with additional information) to those interfaces on top of the map.

Brief bio, interests, etc.

Ryan Mattke is the Map & Geospatial Information Librarian and Head of the John R. Borchert Map Library at the University of Minnesota, as well as Adjunct Faculty in the Masters of Geographic Information Science program. He holds a B.A. in English (Creative Writing) and a Masters of Geographic Information Science from the University of Minnesota. 

During his time with the Borchert Map Library, Ryan has given many presentations and workshops related to mapping and genealogy for various groups in Minnesota. When he is not poring over maps or visualizing data he can be found reading, writing, paddling, hiking, climbing, gardening or building canoes. 

 

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