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ALA Committee on Professional Ethics Committee

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Discussion Follow up from ALAAC17

by Kristin Pekoll-IL (staff) on Mon, Jul 10, 2017 at 09:59 am

Good morning COPE!

I'm attaching 3 documents for your review. 

Good morning COPE!

I'm attaching 3 documents for your review. 

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Discussion Survey: Awareness of Professional Ethics

by Sara Dallas on Thu, May 4, 2017 at 01:53 pm

The  ALA Committee on Professional Ethics requests your participation in a survey and for your help disseminating the survey to any and all librarians. The purpose of the survey is to examine the awareness of professional ethics and principles within our profession.  For the purposes of this survey, professional ethics and principles are defined to include access to information, intellectual freedom, privacy, copyright, and professional conduct.

 

The  ALA Committee on Professional Ethics requests your participation in a survey and for your help disseminating the survey to any and all librarians. The purpose of the survey is to examine the awareness of professional ethics and principles within our profession.  For the purposes of this survey, professional ethics and principles are defined to include access to information, intellectual freedom, privacy, copyright, and professional conduct.

 

www.surveymonkey.com/r/professionalethicsawareness

 For your information, the survey link is being sent to:

  • ALA leadership, including councilors, divisions, and round tables (and their staff liaisons)
  • State Chapter Leadership
  • LM-Net, Publib, ARSL, ALISE

 

Please take a moment, to take the short survey and share it with listservs and  library related social media channels.  Please invite local librarians who may not have professional memberships to ALA or other library professional organizations.  The committee would like to review the results at Annual Conference.  Please complete the survey by May 23, 2017.

 

Sincerely,

Sara Dallas, Chair ALA Committee on Professional Ethics (COPE)

 

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Discussion 2017 Agenda

by Kristin Pekoll-IL (staff) on Thu, Feb 2, 2017 at 08:45 am

Hello COPE members and liaisons; 

I'm posting the Ethics agenda in preparation for our meetings at midwinter and will be sending a duplicate message to the email list.  

Your Staff Liaison, Kristin

Discussion 2016 Annual Minutes, Report to Council, and Report to COO

by Kristin Pekoll-IL (staff) on Thu, Aug 11, 2016 at 10:10 am

Hello COPE members and liaisons; 

I'm posting 3 documents to follow up on our meetings at conference and will be sending a duplicate message to the email list. 

  • Minutes
  • Report to Council
  • Report for Committee on Organization

I appreciate the discussion about liaisons and will be reaching out to division leadership asking for liaison suggestions. 

Your Staff Liaison,

Hello COPE members and liaisons; 

I'm posting 3 documents to follow up on our meetings at conference and will be sending a duplicate message to the email list. 

  • Minutes
  • Report to Council
  • Report for Committee on Organization

I appreciate the discussion about liaisons and will be reaching out to division leadership asking for liaison suggestions. 

Your Staff Liaison,

Kristin 

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Discussion Annual Conference Ethics Committee Documents 2016

by Kristin Pekoll-IL (staff) on Fri, Jun 17, 2016 at 01:12 pm

I'm attaching 3 documents. 

  1. Annual Conference Agenda
  2. Midwinter Meeting Minutes
  3. Midwinter Meeting Report to Council

The committee’s events will take place on:  

I'm attaching 3 documents. 

  1. Annual Conference Agenda
  2. Midwinter Meeting Minutes
  3. Midwinter Meeting Report to Council

The committee’s events will take place on:  

  1. Meeting 1, Friday June 24th, 2016 from 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM at the Orange County Convention Center, Room S330H
  2. Program, No Room at the Library, Sunday, June 26th, 2016 from 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM at the Orange County Convention Center, Room W105B
    1. Actors are meeting at 12:30
  3. Meeting 2, Monday June 27th, 2016 from 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM at the Orange County Convention Center, Room W334

( 9400 Universal Boulevard, Orlando, FL 32819; (407) 685-9800)

 

Please print out and bring copies of these documents with you to the meeting.

If you have any questions, please let Mary Jane or I know. See you in Orlando!

This information will also be available on the Ethics listserv.

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Discussion 2016 Ethics Program SKITS

by Kristin Pekoll-IL (staff) on Mon, May 23, 2016 at 02:29 pm

Below is the list of parts we need to have volunteers for. I've attached the skits that Jamie wrote for our program at 2016 Annual Conference: 

No Room at the Library: The Ethics of Diversity
Sunday, 6/26/16 @ 1:00-2:30 pm Orange County Convention Center, Room W105B

You can volunteer for more than one skit. We'll probably need actors to participate in more than one skit. 

For SKIT 1, we need 

Below is the list of parts we need to have volunteers for. I've attached the skits that Jamie wrote for our program at 2016 Annual Conference: 

No Room at the Library: The Ethics of Diversity
Sunday, 6/26/16 @ 1:00-2:30 pm Orange County Convention Center, Room W105B

You can volunteer for more than one skit. We'll probably need actors to participate in more than one skit. 

For SKIT 1, we need 

  • Narrator - Kaetrena Kendrick
  • Librarian (female, wearing a headscarf) - Jamie Segno
  • Tween Patron - Steven Phalen
  • Parent - Mary Jane Santos

For SKIT 2, we need

  • Narrator - Kaetrena Kendrick
  • Librarian - Ivy Weir
  • Father - Scott Muir

For SKIT 3, we need

  • Narrator - Audra Caplan
  • Outreach Librarian - Steven Phalen
  • Library Director - Sara Dallas
  • Black-2-Front Event Coordinator - Mary Jane Santos

In the comments below, choose your part! 

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Discussion 2015 Annual Conference Minutes and Handout

by Kristin Pekoll-IL (staff) on Mon, Aug 3, 2015 at 09:51 am

I’m attaching our minutes from 2015’s Annual Conference in San Francisco and the handout from the Ethics program. 

Discussion 2015 Annual Conference documents

by Kristin Pekoll-IL (staff) on Wed, Jun 3, 2015 at 11:16 am

I’m attaching our minutes from 2015’s Midwinter Conference and the agenda for Annual’s meetings.

The committee’s meetings will take place on:  

Friday, June 26, 2015 from 1:30 PM – 3:00 PM at the Marriott Marquis San Francisco in Sierra Suite H (780 Mission St. San Francisco, CA 94103. 415-896-1600)

I’m attaching our minutes from 2015’s Midwinter Conference and the agenda for Annual’s meetings.

The committee’s meetings will take place on:  

Friday, June 26, 2015 from 1:30 PM – 3:00 PM at the Marriott Marquis San Francisco in Sierra Suite H (780 Mission St. San Francisco, CA 94103. 415-896-1600)

Monday, June 29, 2015 from 8:30 AM – 10:00 AM at the Moscone Convention Center in MCC 111N (747 Howard St. San Francisco, CA 94103. 415-974-4000)

Please print out and bring copies of these documents with you to the meeting.

If you have any questions, please let Martin or I know. See you in San Francisco!

Kristin

Kristin Pekoll, Assistant Director
Office for Intellectual Freedom
www.ala.org/oif
 American Library Association l 50 E. Huron St. l Chicago, IL  60611
(312) 280-4221 l (800) 545-2433 x4221 toll-free l (312) 280-4227 fax
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Discussion Draft of Copyright: An Interpretation of the Code of Ethics

by Martin Garnar on Tue, May 27, 2014 at 09:45 am

Greetings!  Below is the text of a proposed interpretation of the ALA Code of Ethics on the topic of copyright.  The Committee on Professional Ethics (COPE) will be bringing this interpretation to Council for consideration at the 2014 Annual Conference in Las Vegas and invites your input.

Greetings!  Below is the text of a proposed interpretation of the ALA Code of Ethics on the topic of copyright.  The Committee on Professional Ethics (COPE) will be bringing this interpretation to Council for consideration at the 2014 Annual Conference in Las Vegas and invites your input.

Background: In preparation for the 9th edition of the ALA Intellectual Freedom Manual, focus groups were asked about topics they'd like to see in the new edition, and copyright was one of the top responses.  Since copyright is mentioned in the ALA Code of Ethics, COPE was asked to draft a statement.  Using the Interpretations of the Library Bill of Rights as a model, this statement is intended to take a core concept from the Code of Ethics (in this case, copyright), explain the underlying principles supporting the core concept, and provide some guidance on how to implement these principles.  To draft the statement, COPE convened a working group comprised of members from COPE, the Office for Information Technology Policy's Advisory Copyright Education Subcommittee, and the Committee on Legislation's Subcommittee on Copyright.  The working group was advised by Carrie Russell, Director of the Program on Public Access to Information.  In addition to an FAQ document that will be completed by the OITP Advisory Copyright Education Subcommittee, the working group drafted the following document. 

COPE is inviting comments on the draft, which is reproduced below in its entirety and is also attached as a Word document.  You may leave comments below, or you can send them to Martin Garnar, chair of COPE, at mgarnar@regis.edu (comments made using Word's reviewing features on a marked-up draft welcomed). Please note that Martin will be traveling from June 8th through June 21st, so any emails received during that period will not be acknowledged until his return.  COPE will also hold an open hearing on the draft interpretation during its first business meeting on Friday, June 27th from 1:30 to 3 p.m. in Room N101 of the Las Vegas Convention Center.

Thanks in advance for your input. 

Copyright: An Interpretation of the Code of Ethics (version 23 May 2014)

The purpose of copyright is to advance knowledge through the dissemination of information and creative works to benefit the public, which is why copyright is central to the mission of libraries. When working effectively, copyright should provide the broadest access to information for the public while balancing the interests of rights holders.  Libraries achieve this when they purchase information resources for their communities, when they curate and preserve the cultural heritage, when they establish services and programs to enhance access to information, and when they simply lend books or other resources.

In Article 1, Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution, “Congress shall have the Power…To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries.” Thus, Congress creates copyright law to encourage the creation of writings, art, music and other works by providing an economic incentive for authors, innovators, and inventors. In turn, creators make these works available to the public through sales or other means. The economic incentive provided to creators is a limited, statutory monopoly. Only creators can sell or otherwise vend their works. The monopoly, however, has limits—copyright duration, the public domain, limits on what can be protected by copyright, user exceptions like fair use, and many more. Libraries, archives, and non-profit educational institutions also have exceptions to the copyright law that allow libraries to lend works, preserve, and replace works, make copies for library users and so on.  It is these limits that ensure that the monopoly is not absolute, that certain uses by the public are lawful, and that new creative works are encouraged, building on the advancements that have occurred over time.

Article IV of the Code of Ethics states that librarians “respect copyright law and advocate balance between the interests of information users and rights holders.” Therefore, librarians should remain informed about copyright developments, particularly those that can limit or restrict exceptions for users.  Librarians are and should be the copyright consultants for their user community. This requires a solid understanding of the purpose of the law and some basics, and through this understanding, good judgment, and fairness, and exercise exceptions to their full extent, in particular, the fair use exception. The importance of fair use to library services and the public we serve cannot be understated—its flexibility allows for user privileges in unanticipated situations, destined to occur in times of change. [1]  

Moreover, libraries and their parent institutions have a responsibility to maintain policies and procedures that are consistent with current copyright law and institutional mission. More than simply respecting the rights of copyright owners, such policies and procedures should encourage and enable the optimal availability of copyrighted materials for library users through the full employment of the available exceptions within copyright law. Library staff should be regularly trained to consistently recognize and observe the limits of copyright, understand their rights and those of their users, and be ready to educate or properly refer users with questions pertaining to copyright.

Digital technology, networks, and content are ubiquitous.  The public expects to have access content at any time. Libraries are equally demanding in their expectation—they expect to acquire or access content for their users and serve their information needs.  Today’s digital content is made available by rights holders to libraries and the average consumer through licenses agreement—often non-negotiable—rather than the carefully crafted copyright law that Congress provides.  Acquiring or accessing content by license agreement can, and often does, limit user rights realized in the analog world.

Recent amendments to the copyright law have expanded the rights of rights holders with little or no countering benefits in the public interest.  In order to restore balance, librarians need to directly engage in negotiations with rights holders, create and embrace open access, and vehemently advocate on behalf of their users and user rights.  Librarians have a proud history of advocating for the public interest, and ensuring that copyright remains a balance between information users and rights holders is the librarian’s essential task in the digital age. 


[1] For more information about the copyright law, see the forthcoming Copyright FAQs for Libraries prepared by the OITP Advisory Copyright Education Subcommittee.

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