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Bohyun Kim's picture

Call for Participation: LITA UX IG Meeting at ALA 2015

Call for Participation: LITA UX IG Meeting at ALA 2015

The LITA User Experience IG seeks 2-3 short presentations (10-15 minutes) on UX and Web usability for the upcoming 2015 ALA Annual Conference. This will be a physical meeting, and so the physical attendance for the ALA Annual Conference in San Francisco is required for the presentation and/or attendance for this meeting. (Sorry, all travel expenses are the responsibility of the attendee.) 

The LITA UX IG is also seeking the suggestions for discussion topics, things you have been working on, plan to work, or want to work on in terms of UX/Usability. All suggestions and presentation topics are welcome and will be given consideration for presentation and discussion. 

At the meeting, we will also take volunteers who will moderate the UX Twitter Chat by the LITA UX IG and Weave and/or who are interested in participating into organizing more meetings for the UX IG.

Please submit your topic below in the comments section of this CFP post in ALA Connect (http://connect.ala.org/node/239292) and also e-mail us off-the-list.

Please add your thoughts and ideas in the comments!

Meeting Details

Title: LITA User Experience IG Meeting
Date & Time: Monday, June 29, 2015 - 3-4 PM
Location: Hotel NIkko Golden Gate

Thanks!

Bohyun Kim, LITA UX IG chair bkim@hshsl.umaryland.edu
Rachel Clark, LITA UX IG vice-chair rachael.clark@wayne.edu

Jennie Rose Halperin (non-member)'s picture

talk proposal:

Rocket Surgery for the Recent MLS: Use the skills you already know to become a lean, mean UX machine

When first tasked with defining a qualitative research roadmap for Safari Books Online this year, I was shocked to discover how much I used the skills I learned in my MLS and experience as an reference librarian, from usability testing to proper survey protocol to distinguishing what users want versus what they're asking for. User experience and research is an obvious career choice for the recent MLIS graduate, and learning the basics (and jargon) of UX is often a book, podcast, or blog post away.

In my talk, I will discuss the resources I found most useful as I entered the field of user and design research as well as highlight common popular tools, patterns, and methods I use at an Agile company that can translate to libraries and other cultural heritage institutions.

I'll also emphasize how the common sense skills that librarians possess are an asset and a weapon in the field of usability and user research. Slaying usability dragons often takes little more than a love of documentation, excellent organizational skills, and a lot of confidence. Librarians are uniquely positioned to be UX leaders, and I hope that this talk can help those who want to transition their skills in the library world and beyond.

Allison Deluca (non-member)'s picture

Presentation Proposal: Card Sorting, One small step forward

Card sorting may be the gateway user testing your library needs to begin a website redesign. Step-by-step, I will go over the process I used to begin my user testing experience at my own library, Florida Atlantic University.

User testing opened our eyes to a new way of looking at our own website and our patrons. While we suspected our patrons didn't understand our jargon, or how to navigate the website efficiently, we were floored with the results of each and every user test we conducted.

Deciding to conduct this user testing has been one small step forward for our library and I'm more than happy to share my experience so that others can benefit.

Bohyun Kim's picture

So that I can contact you? Thanks!

 

Bohyun Kim's picture

We want to deliberately examine how users interact with the information we provide, after they enter the building. This includes a variety of media, such as e-boards, signage, the website, service points, etc. Basically, any time a user has a need regarding some in-building space or service, we want to think about how the user goes about fulfilling that need, and how the building can best provide relevant information to the user.

So far we've done an analysis of e-board usage and content, and we're in the middle of a study looking at computer use in the building and how we communicate computer availability. We're also doing more general, ethnographic stuff in an ongoing way. I can talk about all of this, or any part.