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PAIG Midwinter Agenda 2015

Preservation Administrators Interest Group Meeting Agenda

ALA Midwinter 2015

Saturday, January 31st, 8:30-11:30am

McCormick Place West W180

 

8:30 – 8:35 – Welcome

 

8:35 – 8:50 - Jeanne Drewes - Chief of Binding and Collections Care in the Preservation Directorate at the Library of Congress in the United States – Update from the Library of Congress

 

8:50 – 9:00 - Annie Peterson - Preservation Librarian at Tulane  University – Update on Preservation Statistics

 

9:00 – 9:25 - Amanda Eisemann

Title: PSAP: Promoting Preservation and Conservation through Self-Assessment

Abstract: The Preservation Self-Assessment Program (PSAP) is a free, open source web application designed to guide collection managers, curators, and volunteers of smaller cultural heritage institutions through the process of identifying and assessing the preservation needs of their collections.  The PSAP permits assessment of a wide range of common A/V, photographic, paper, and book formats at the item-level and the collection level.  It automatically generates reports as CSV and PDF files, and it provides basic descriptive metadata in EAD and DC.  Although it is chiefly an assessment tool, the PSAP also functions as both a supplemental guide and an educational resource for non-specialists with an interest in material conservation and preservation. 

 

9:25 – 9:50 - Scott W Devine &  Tonia Effie Grafakos

Title: Arabic Manuscripts at Northwestern: Conservation, Research, and the Changing Role of Preservation Services

Abstract: The ‘Umar Falke Collection is the largest of the four Arabic manuscript collections held by the Herskovits Library of African Studies and consists of over 3,000 19th and early 20th century manuscripts. The uniqueness of the Falke Collection, coupled with growing scholarly interest in the intellectual history of West Africa, make it a prime candidate for scholarly research and digitization. This presentation will summarize materials analysis research which grew out of a multi-year preservation needs assessment survey. A pilot project designed to address conservation and digitization issues will also be discussed. Ongoing work to learn more about the collection has involved collaboration with Northwestern faculty and research scientists and provides a case study for the evolving role of conservation research in the preservation of library collections.

 

9:50 – 10:00 - Break

 

10:00 – 10:20 - Janet Gertz

Title: E-journal Preservation

Abstract: Discussion of definitions of different levels of e-journal preservation and updates on the Cornell/Columbia Project.

 

10:20 – 10:40 - Peggy Griesinger

Title: Choosing and Implementing Metadata Standards for Specialized Material Types

Abstract: This talk will detail efforts by the Museum of Modern Art’s Media Conservation Department to reevaluate current institutional documentation practices for recording information about the museum’s time-based media collection. In particular, this presentation will examine the process of researching and evaluating existing metadata standards to fulfill a specific institutional need, and implementing those standards within an existing digital repository framework. It will also examine potential uses for this type of information both inside and outside of MoMA. This project is part of the National Digital Stewardship Residency of New York.

 

10:40 – 11:00 - Vicky Steeves

Title: Scientific Data: A Needs Assessment Journey

Abstract: Scientific data, being increasingly digital and complex in nature, has exponential storage and management needs. As a part of my National Digital Stewardship Residency, I have conducted a needs assessment surveys for scientific datasets aimed to look at storage, management, and preservation needs. In this session, I will discuss the development of that survey and the primary results from interviewing 50+ AMNH scientists. This will segue into an explanation of the results and identified institutional needs. The majority of this presentation will be a discussion of my preliminary findings on emerging technology that can be used to answer concerns surrounding the management and digital preservation of these scientific data.

 

11:00 – 11:25 - Robert Schnare

Title:  Terrorism and Its Potential Impact on Academic Libraries

Abstract: The intent of this paper is to inform academic libraries of the potentials facing them from Terrorism both Domestic and Foreign.   It will discuss steps that can be taken to heighten awareness of this problem; steps that can be taken to try and safeguard the building, the patrons and the library staff.   It will also discuss measures to try and cope with the problem before and after incidents. Two factors are critical to academic libraries in dealing with Terrorism.   The academic libraries cannot act and must not act alone.  The academic administrations must develop plans to cope with Terrorism on the institutions, especially the academic libraries.  Terrorism Plans must also go beyond the confines of the institutions.   The second factor is the academic libraries must develop their Terrorism Plans to dovetail with their Disaster Plans.   At some point if a Terrorism incident occurs, it may move beyond Terrorism to Disaster Recovery.

 

11:25 – 11:30 - Announcements