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Diversity Member Initiative Group Community

In: Advocacy, Diversity, Diversity, Member Initiative Groups, Mentoring, Multicultural Services, Resource Sharing, Social Change, Special Needs Populations, Transforming Libraries

The ALA Office for Diversity, Literacy, and Outreach Services (ODLOS) is launching Intersections, a new blog that highlights the everyday work of library and information science workers as they advocate for equity and inclusion as they relate to diversity, literacy and access among membership, the field of librarianship and the communities they serve.

Hello!
 
I just wanted to quickly reach out and engage the wisdom of our community regarding diversity efforts. At my institution, we are just kicking off a Diversity and Inclusion Working Group. Part of my contribution to this initial stage is a benchmarking effort - developing some awareness of what other libraries are currently doing in this area, and what they have found effective.
 

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Discussions

Discussion Test drive discussion: How can we further diversity values within our work spaces?

by Melissa Cardenas-Dow on Mon, Apr 4, 2016 at 12:21 pm

Hello everyone,

To test out our ground rules, and perhaps help us find some more, let's start by discussing diversity values at our places of work. To help us focus our discussion, please read the following article from Everyday Feminism, called Diversity Is Not A Certificate: How to Dismantle Oppression at Your Work Place: http://everydayfeminism.com/2015/02/dismantling-oppression-at-work/

Hello everyone,

To test out our ground rules, and perhaps help us find some more, let's start by discussing diversity values at our places of work. To help us focus our discussion, please read the following article from Everyday Feminism, called Diversity Is Not A Certificate: How to Dismantle Oppression at Your Work Place: http://everydayfeminism.com/2015/02/dismantling-oppression-at-work/

After reading the article, I'd like to hear your thoughts. What steps have you taken at your workplace that you've found useful? What have you tried that weren't as great? How can the Diversity MIG and the work at ALA support your own diversity work at your library?

~Melissa

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Discussion Diversity-Related Conversation Starter Panel

by Rachel Hildebrandt on Tue, Apr 5, 2016 at 07:54 pm

The voting for the Conversation Starter panels opened this week. Along with Doris Gebel and Marc Aronson, both long-time advocates for international children's and YA literature, I have proposed a panel titled "Other People's Voices: Using Global Literature in Translation to Reimagine Diversity in Libraries." The selection for these types of panels involves both member and staff votes. If you feel so inclined, we'd be very grateful for your vote, in the hope of actually making the final cut!

The voting for the Conversation Starter panels opened this week. Along with Doris Gebel and Marc Aronson, both long-time advocates for international children's and YA literature, I have proposed a panel titled "Other People's Voices: Using Global Literature in Translation to Reimagine Diversity in Libraries." The selection for these types of panels involves both member and staff votes. If you feel so inclined, we'd be very grateful for your vote, in the hope of actually making the final cut!

http://connect.ala.org/alaac16csvoting?page=0%2C0%2C4

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Discussion Global Literature in Libraries Initiative

by Rachel Hildebrandt on Mon, Apr 4, 2016 at 01:02 pm

Dear Diversity MIG Members,
 

Dear Diversity MIG Members,
 
As means of introduction, I am a German literary translator, who recently joined ALA as an associate member. My interest in ALA stems from my work related to the establishing of a new initiative called Global Literature in Libraries. The goal of this group, which involves translators, librarians and publishers, is to raise the visibility of international literature, both in translation and in the original languages, in the context of public, academic, and school libraries. We are currently working on a variety of specific projects, including library-themed book lists, translator-organized programming, and conference workshops. Our hope is to create a growing number of interfaces with libraries and library organizations around the country to explore collaboratively how translators and publishers can aid librarians in expanding the concept of global diversity via international literature and programming. 
 
Our working GLLI mission statement:
 
The Global Literature in Libraries Initiative strives to raise the visibility of world literature for adults and children at the local, national and international levels. We intend to do so by facilitating close and direct collaboration between translators, librarians and publishers, because we believe translators are uniquely positioned to help librarians provide support and events to engage readers of all ages in a library framework that explores and celebrates literature from around the world.
 
We do not have a website yet, but we are currently using a FB group to facilitate dialogue between members located around the world: https://www.facebook.com/groups/globallit/. If you would be interested in joining this group, just let me know. Otherwise, please post in this thread any ideas you may have pertaining to ways in which diversity through international literature could be promoted. Also, I will be down at the ALA conference in Orlando to build contacts in the hope of expanding the foundation for this group moving forward. If you'd like to meet with us, we'd be glad for any opportunities to dialogue about this topic and initiative.

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Discussion Discussion ground rules

by Melissa Cardenas-Dow on Mon, Apr 4, 2016 at 12:14 pm

Hello everyone!

One of the functions of this Diversity MIG is to be a home and community of practice that will support its members push their capacity to become more empathetic, more inclusive, both in thought and in deed. Our thoughts often predetermine our actions, so we want to be able to challenge ourselves and each other to learn, stretch, and grow, but always with acceptance and with the belief that we all come to this space with the best of intentions.

With this in mind, I'd like to start with a few basic ground rules for discussion:

Hello everyone!

One of the functions of this Diversity MIG is to be a home and community of practice that will support its members push their capacity to become more empathetic, more inclusive, both in thought and in deed. Our thoughts often predetermine our actions, so we want to be able to challenge ourselves and each other to learn, stretch, and grow, but always with acceptance and with the belief that we all come to this space with the best of intentions.

With this in mind, I'd like to start with a few basic ground rules for discussion:

1) Accept responsibility for the quality of the discussion.

2) Differ respectfully.

3) Be present, attentive, and engaged.

 

What other rules/guidelines should we incorporate?

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Discussion Classifying Transgender Topics: Survey

by Gwendolyn Prellwitz (staff) on Tue, Mar 8, 2016 at 03:46 pm

https://illinois.edu/sb/sec/3390592
[Please share this far and wide!]

Do you identify as transgender and/or gender-nonconforming? Are you 18 or over? Do you live in the United States? Would you like to discuss the language that you use to describe your gender identity?

For the purposes of this study, “transgender” and “gender-nonconforming” are used for any person whose gender identity currently differs from the one they were assigned at birth.

https://illinois.edu/sb/sec/3390592
[Please share this far and wide!]

Do you identify as transgender and/or gender-nonconforming? Are you 18 or over? Do you live in the United States? Would you like to discuss the language that you use to describe your gender identity?

For the purposes of this study, “transgender” and “gender-nonconforming” are used for any person whose gender identity currently differs from the one they were assigned at birth.

If so, you are invited to participate in a research study exploring trans language being conducted by K.R. Roberto, a Ph.D. candidate in library and information science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, under the supervision of Dr. Kathryn La Barre, Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. This study was approved by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign’s Institutional Review Board for the Protection of Human Subjects on Feb. 29, 2016.

Survey participants will be asked to review a list of terms used to describe gender identities; they will indicate which term(s) they identify with personally, and then select term(s) with which they are familiar. This survey will take approximately 10-20 minutes to complete.

These results will then be used to create a thesaurus of transgender and gender-nonconforming language. Task participants will be asked to review a short list of items (primarily books and videos) and to assign keywords for each item using the thesaurus; this task will take approximately 30-60 minutes to complete. Participants may also volunteer to be interviewed about their experiences; this interview is expected to be no longer than 60 minutes.

Participants may choose to participate in the survey, the thesaurus project, or both.

Review of the criteria for participation:

1) Currently self-identify as transgender and/or gender-nonconforming
2) Be 18 or over
3) Currently live in the United States

If you have questions about these criteria, please email K.R. Roberto at kroberto@illinois.edu or Dr. Kathryn La Barre at klabarre@illinois.edu

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Discussion Nominate the next honoree for "Achievement in Library Diversity Research"

by Melissa Cardenas-Dow on Tue, Feb 2, 2016 at 02:37 pm

Hello everyone!

An announcement from Jody Gray, Director of ALA Office for Diversity, Literacy & Outreach Services:

Please share.

Nominate the next honoree for "Achievement in Library Diversity Research"

Hello everyone!

An announcement from Jody Gray, Director of ALA Office for Diversity, Literacy & Outreach Services:

Please share.

Nominate the next honoree for "Achievement in Library Diversity Research"

Each year the Diversity Research Grant Advisory Committee seeks to recognize an individual for significant contributions to diversity research and outreach efforts in Library and Information Science by honoring them with an Achievement in Library Diversity Research. Achievement is defined as a body of work or a groundbreaking piece whose dissemination advances our understanding of or sparks new research in the areas of diversity. Entries are not limited to peer reviewed, scholarly publication. We welcome open access and other forms of published dissemination. Nominations are accepted year-round and an honoree will be selected from the pool of nominees received by March 15, 2016 with the award presented at the 2016 ALA Annual Conference in Orlando, FL. Self-nominations are welcome. 

More information and the short form are available at:  http://www.ala.org/research/larks/honoring-excellence-achievement-library-diversity-research.  Please direct any questions to diversity@ala.org.

 

 

Jody Gray, MLIS
Director, Office for Diversity, Literacy, and Outreach Services
American Library Association

50 E. Huron St.
Chicago, IL 60611
E-mail: jgray@ala.org
Phone: 312-280-5295
1-800-545-2433, ext. 5295
website: www.ala.org/diversity

 

 

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Discussion Review: ‘On the Edge of Gone’ by Corinne Duyvis

by Cynthia Parkhill on Sat, Jan 23, 2016 at 09:21 pm

Minutes before a meteor strikes the earth, Denise and her mother are granted temporary shelter aboard a “generation ship,” designed for a journey that will take several lifetimes to travel to distant planets.

Before the meteor, Denise cared for cats at an animal shelter. She attended neighborhood events that were organized by her sister Iris. But before it even struck the earth, the meteor’s arrival changed everyone’s life irrecoverably.

Now ships like this are one of humankind’s few hopes for surviving the meteor’s impact.

Minutes before a meteor strikes the earth, Denise and her mother are granted temporary shelter aboard a “generation ship,” designed for a journey that will take several lifetimes to travel to distant planets.

Before the meteor, Denise cared for cats at an animal shelter. She attended neighborhood events that were organized by her sister Iris. But before it even struck the earth, the meteor’s arrival changed everyone’s life irrecoverably.

Now ships like this are one of humankind’s few hopes for surviving the meteor’s impact.

During the few days that remain until the ship is ready to launch, Denise is desperate to find Iris, to keep her mother clean from drugs and to win a place for her and for her family aboard the generation ship.

Complete review at: http://cynthiaparkhill.blogspot.com/2016/01/on-edge-of-gone-by-corinne-d...

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Discussion Keep Autism Speaks out of library-service discussion

by Cynthia Parkhill on Tue, Aug 18, 2015 at 09:41 am

As a woman on the autism spectrum who is beginning a library career, I was excited to read about the Project PALS training for library service to people with autism.

Of particular interest was a statement by American Libraries Direct in its brief summary, that Project PALS developers “teamed with people with autism.” But when I clicked through, I encountered a reference only to “Autism Speaks.”

Project PALS organizers need to know that Autism Speaks is not an “advocacy organization,” but a promoter of hateful and degrading stereotypes.

As a woman on the autism spectrum who is beginning a library career, I was excited to read about the Project PALS training for library service to people with autism.

Of particular interest was a statement by American Libraries Direct in its brief summary, that Project PALS developers “teamed with people with autism.” But when I clicked through, I encountered a reference only to “Autism Speaks.”

Project PALS organizers need to know that Autism Speaks is not an “advocacy organization,” but a promoter of hateful and degrading stereotypes.

I ask that libraries, when promoting similar services, stop quoting from Autism Speaks. Instead, give greater prominence to the contributions of autistic people and their allies.

Read complete post

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Discussion Review: ‘Accessing the Future,’ disability-themed SF

by Cynthia Parkhill on Sat, Aug 15, 2015 at 01:04 pm

As a library professional, it matters to me that resources in the collection validate the experiences and reflect the diversity that exists among its readership. Science fiction, like other genres of storytelling, needs to advance this aim.

As a library professional, it matters to me that resources in the collection validate the experiences and reflect the diversity that exists among its readership. Science fiction, like other genres of storytelling, needs to advance this aim.

For this reason, Accessing the Future (Futurefire.net, 2015), is a vitally important addition to the diverse library collection. Edited by Kathryn Allan and Djibril al-Ayad, Accessing the Future explores issues of disability, accommodation and accessibility through speculative fiction and art. Its contributors provide unique and valuable perspectives in which characters with disabilities navigate future societies.

Read more

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Discussion ‘The Real Boy’ by Anne Ursu

by Cynthia Parkhill on Tue, Jul 21, 2015 at 11:42 am

In the cellar beneath a magician’s shop, a young boy named Oscar enjoys a life of quiet routine — of gathering herbs from his master’s garden and then grinding them for use while the household cats keep him company. 

Oscar’s master, Caleb, and magic smiths of the community create and sell enchanted objects and charms for a city’s privileged inhabitants. 

In the cellar beneath a magician’s shop, a young boy named Oscar enjoys a life of quiet routine — of gathering herbs from his master’s garden and then grinding them for use while the household cats keep him company. 

Oscar’s master, Caleb, and magic smiths of the community create and sell enchanted objects and charms for a city’s privileged inhabitants. 

Suddenly, the community is plagued by terrifying and unexplained events and Oscar must emerge from his cellar sanctuary and tend the shop while his master is away. He reluctantly teams up with the healer’s apprentice to try to solve mysterious ailments that threaten the children of the city. 

Read more

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This member initiative group provides an organizational home for anyone dedicated to fostering an improved climate for diversity within their institutions and professional organizations.

The mission of the Diversity Membership Initiative Group is:

  • To provide a space for success stories and best practices and broadly highlight examples of activities that have improved services and fostered organizational change.
  • To provide a community of practice for members to discuss ideas, concepts, and methods to positively impact library services to increasingly diverse populations.
  • To provide a base for deepening our discussion and collective understanding of diversity and inclusion issues across our professional organizations.

Possible activities:
• Collecting success stories for the ALA website
• Launching a Journal Club
• Identifying training topics and facilitators to enhance ALA's online learning offerings
• Connecting members around topics of mutual interest for publishing and presenting
• Identifying best practices from member organizations and implementing them elsewhere
• Supporting efforts to make ALA welcoming
• Providing feedback to the ALA Council Committee on Diversity and the Special Presidential Task Force on Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion

Subscribe to Diversity Member Initiative Group