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Reorganizing for the Future: Five Stories for an Online Discussion

ACRL ULS Online Discussion about “Reorganizing for the Future”

brought to you by the ULS Membership Committee

Updated information:

URL for the evaluation: http://bit.ly/W8qQJ0

Slides for the event are attached.

Recording URL: http://bit.ly/1l3c4IP (Note that it may be interrupted early on, but it picks back up.)

Some reorganization org charts are available below.

 

Stories

 

Monday, July 14, 2014

2 PM – 3 PM (EDT)

Do you work in a “library of the future”? Would you like to learn how to reorganize so that yours can be such a library?

Join the ACRL ULS Committee on the Future of University Libraries in an online moderated discussion about how several university libraries evaluated existing resources in order to pave the way for new services. What efficiencies were found in operations? What tough decisions to modify or eliminate existing services were considered? How did reorganization free up resources to help the organization move forward?

For the discussion, we have gathered five stories that describe successful library reorganizations that support the future of the library. The writers of three of the stories will form a panel to discuss your questions using the stories as starting points for investigating how to set priorities, create efficiencies, follow aspirations, overcome constraints, and take advantage of opportunities. Below are some glimpses to get you thinking.

The online discussion is free. To register, please see https://acrl.webex.com/acrl/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=661077865. ACRL ULS members are offered first priority.

 

Priorities
A focus on library priorities led to a merger. “Fiscal restraints and tight implementation timelines coupled with ongoing discussions about how best to re-imagine library space and services given actual usage and future needs resulted in the merger of two branch library staff and collections.” [Read the whole story #1.]

Efficiencies
A whole library reorganization led to successful efficiencies. “The Review simultaneously created staff capacity that was re-deployed in areas where the Libraries are growing, and was informed by a staff survey that allowed people to articulate their strengths and interests and helped the organization reveal hidden talent and interest.” [Read the whole story #2.]

Aspirations
Restructuring is embraced to focus on future aspirations. “…University Libraries are nearing the end of a self-evaluation intended to prepare the organization for the change from an environment based on print resources to one built on digital materials.” [Read the whole story #3.]

Constraints
Budget constraints prompted the formation of a new access services department. “The new group began by identifying successes to replicate…. User needs, workflows, and capacity were analyzed, to leverage limited resources for maximum benefit. … [Operations] were standardized for efficient and consistent service.” [Read the whole story #4.]

Opportunities
Reorganization provided opportunities within access services units. “The goals of the Access Services reorganization for … libraries included removal of silos, increased cross-training of staff to flex during high-impact periods and to better inform workflows across divisions, re-envisioning the staffing and labor of certain service points, and integration of functions with Technical Services.” [Read the whole story #5.]

 

STORIES
Please feel free to contact any of the story authors for more information about their experiences.

 

Story #1.

In 2013, due to a campus-wide budget cut, the McGill University Library had to eliminate 1.8 million dollars (5.2%) from its budget. Fiscal restraints and tight implementation timelines coupled with ongoing discussions about how best to re-imagine library space and services given actual usage and future needs resulted in the merger of two branch library staff and collections in the summer of 2013.

The Life Science Library and the Education Library were among the lowest in terms of gate count and use of print books. Loans were also steadily decreasing in both libraries. Formal consultation processes on the future of the McGill Library were conducted, with the aim of informing the McGill community of the situation, while enabling relevant staff and stakeholders to provide input on their needs. Following careful review, the Life Sciences Library staff and collection merged into the Schulich Library of Science and Engineering, while the Education Library staff and collection moved into the Humanities and Social Sciences Library. Low-use materials were relocated to storage. A service point was established in each space in order to provide access to reserve materials, as well as consultation and circulation services. Librarians based out of the two remaining libraries were prompted to provide services through scheduled on-site office hours, individual consults, instruction and online assistance.

In parallel, a voluntary retirement program and attrition resulted in the loss of 31 of 130 staff positions. Because some departments experienced greater loss than others, resources were redeployed to areas that faced more serious gaps. A single service point model was implemented in each branch library, with a vast training program provided to all support staff assigned to work these desks. This allowed librarians to redirect their time to other activities such as teaching, outreach, and creating online learning materials. Librarians have also led in the development of new services including an institutional repository and a Copyright Compliance Office.

Despite the economic, strategic and emotional challenges of that year, based on the way library use is changing in an increasingly digitized world, some restructuring of libraries would have occurred regardless of the budget cuts. The Library has since undertaken a planning exercise to help direct efforts and activities over the next 1-3 years. The least that can be said is that the McGill University Library is now in a better position to respond to the next winds of change.

Carole Urbain, Director of Academic Affairs, McGill University Library

 

Story #2.

In Fall 2011 the University of Minnesota Libraries undertook an organizational review with the intention to restructure the organization to better support the strategic plan and directions. The review concluded in April 2012 resulting in a greatly altered Libraries structure that coalesced expertise from across the organization around broad strategic directions.  The structural changes, while foundational, perhaps obscure some of the smaller, impactful intentions and outcomes of the process.  The organization adopted a “zone” model in which it increased supervisory spans and decreased structural layers signifying greater emphasis on managerial work and leadership (with still unfolding positive results!).  Work became more efficiently distributed across each zone, moving away from a model where functional expertise was replicated in each individual library, large and small.

In the newly formed Research and Learning Division (encompassing Public Service functions), Departmental Directors and Managers assumed the majority of Administrative and Operational Management responsibilities; thereby allowing Subject Liaisons and other specialist professionals (Instructional Design and Delivery, Copyright,  Data Services as examples) to more significantly focus on supporting those needs. New horizontal structures (Instructional Coordinators, Research Services, Data Management Curation) were created to provide the opportunity for increased focus in these areas while ensuring coordination across the organization. The Review simultaneously created staff capacity that was re-deployed in areas where the Libraries is growing, and was informed by a staff survey that allowed people to articulate their strengths and interests and helped the organization reveal that hidden talent and interest. At present, roughly 2 years out from initial changes, the organization is working through review and fine-tuning of the new structure to ensure continued focus on the intended outcomes.

Jeffrey S. Bullington, Director, Physical Sciences and Engineering Libraries, University of Minnesota Twin Cities

Philip Herold, Research & Learning Director for Agricultural, Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Minnesota Twin Cities

 

Story #3.

The University of Massachusetts Amherst University Libraries are nearing the end of a self-evaluation intended to prepare the organization for the change from an environment based on print resources to one built on digital materials. The Digital Strategies group, a committee that plans the Libraries’ digital activities focusing on digital content created or collected by the libraries, charged a task force to implement a strategic plan calling for integration of digital content and services into the Libraries’ workflow.

The Task Force began with some basic premises:

  • Collection and curation of unique content was paramount
  • Our Libraries did not intend to form a centralized Digital Library or Digital Projects office
  • Many existing positions in our organization were created to serve a bibliographic work environment, and that environment has changed dramatically

As the Task Force worked through these challenges the group members realized that the incorporation of unique digital materials and services into the mainstream workflows of the Libraries would require an examination of most aspects of the Libraries’ current structure and functions. Through its examination of individual units, the group has explored many topics including:

  • Recognizing the existence of a “shadow library” that accomplishes necessary tasks outside the formal organizational structure and how to incorporate it into the structure
  • Developing a pool of non-MARC metadata creation specialists
  • Developing a R&D/skunkworks/sandbox aspect to the organization
  • The redefinition of a subject liaison’s role
  • Developing cultures (i.e., new ways of thinking) throughout the Libraries
  • Re-tasking existing bibliographic positions for work with digital resources

The Task Force is nearing the end of its charge and is still having strong discussions about the organization and its future. We welcome opportunities to share our experiences with other libraries.

Brian P. Shelburne, Head, Image Collection Library, University of Massachusetts Amherst

 

Story #4.

The MIT Libraries reorganized in 2010. Services, collections and staff were brought together by functions, toward the goal of  “One Library, One Collection.” The new organization’s shape was framed by the need to deliver services to an interdisciplinary research community working on a 24x7 basis across the globe, as well as a shift toward digital content. The organization’s size was constrained by economic realities.

Access Services for MIT’s four main libraries, Resource Sharing, Scanning, and Storage were merged into a new department called Information Delivery and Library Access (ID&LA). This diverse portfolio of programs came together as a patchwork quilt. Customer service, including collections as services, was the common thread joining together forty staff across varied locations, schedules, and service cultures.

Each of the teams within ID&LA was composed of talented staff, however, few had previously worked together to jointly solve problems. The new group began by identifying successes to replicate, toward solutions at scale. User needs, workflows, and capacity were analyzed, to leverage limited resources for maximum benefit. Many operations were standardized for efficient and consistent service, with some flexibility to support targeted user communities.

Early actions included encouraging staff to work across service points outside of their home library, centralizing electronic and print course reserves services, creating new approaches for stacks management, and integrating the retrieval of materials from the stacks for both patron requests and resource sharing transactions. Two unmediated borrowing services were added to extend the reach of MIT’s collections. Borrowing periods were increased to reduce barriers to access. An ‘auto-renew’ service will soon launch to save patrons time by anticipating their needs.  Expanded delivery of library materials to offices or dormitories is under active discussion.  ID&LA now leads improvements to the MIT Libraries facilities to increase support for collaborative learning and innovation.

Christine Quirion, Head, Information Delivery & Library Access, MIT Libraries

 

Story #5.

In 2009, Harvard University offered the first of two subsequent early retirement packages to staff and the ensuing Harvard College Library reorganizations, while prompted in part by a need to maintain workflows in light of the changes in staffing, provided the opportunity to review all workflows and ensure the skill sets of the staff were being used effectively.  This description focuses on the Department of Access Services within Widener and Lamont libraries, the main research and undergraduate libraries, respectively. 

The goals of the Access Services reorganization for Widener and Lamont libraries included removal of silos, increased cross-training of staff to flex during high-impact periods and to better inform workflows across divisions, re-envisioning the staffing and labor of certain service points, and integration of functions with Technical Services.  Specific goals included:

  • Commitment to cross training
  • Commitment to collections security
  • Staff participation in teams for policy and workflow oversight
  • Excellent customer service, internal and external
  • Information literacy for reference triage

Access Services staffing was reduced by over 30% as a result of early retirements, attrition, and the elimination of a category of less than half-time employee. Simultaneously, we were working with the campus-wide library community to ensure the launch of a new Scan and Deliver service with no additional labor. Additionally, after a hiatus, we reincorporated Serials check-in with no additional labor, including retrospective check-in. 

The tools used to effect the change included a Skills Assessment of all Access Services staff in Widener and Lamont libraries to ensure that librarians and library staff had the opportunity to self-assess their contributions and potential in addition to assessments by managers.  Concurrently, working groups were created for the various functional areas comprised of librarians and library staff to ensure that all perspectives and expertise were informing changes to workflows and services.

The reorganization began with the Widener Access Services divisions of Privileges, Circulation, Interlibrary Loan, Harvard Depository Transfer, Stacks Management, and Serials, and eventually included the Access Services Department for Lamont Library (undergraduate library).

Follow these links to fuller reports on the process and results.

http://hcl.harvard.edu/news/articles/2010/access_services_reorg.cfm
http://hcl.harvard.edu/news/articles/2009/scan_and_deliver.cfmhttps://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B8Njkfrh3_3CVmVQU3ZZdUZ5bnc&usp=sharing

Cheryl McGrath, Director, MacPháidín Library and Archives, Stonehill College