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Andromeda Yelton's picture

Say hi!

Tags: Chit-chat

I thought it would be nice if we introduced ourselves.

 

I'm Andromeda.  Simmons MLS 2010, thought I'd work for an academic library doing electronic resources or something, found myself working at a startup doing ebooks and social media and web development and copy writing and pretty much whatever needs doing.

 

Before Gluejar I had a smattering of code here and there -- the semester of C++ I forgot from undergrad, some SQL and PHP from library school, some self-taught Python (via Google's Python intro, awesome).  At Gluejar I've done more Python and spent an awful lot of time pretending I know jQuery, which means I sometimes have to pretend I know JavaScript too.  So I thought it would be nice to actually know some JavaScript.  Also I am super-interested in librarians' tech skills and how we learn them, and in online communities, so Code Year seemed like a great way for me to learn more about those things.

 

I'm hoping this group will attract a mix of people with some code experience who are eager to help out, and people with minimal or no code experience who are eager to learn, and we can all hold hands together.

 

var conclusion = "Learning code is super-awesome and empowering";
print conclusion;
Laura Krier's picture

Hello! I had actually set myself an unofficial resolution to improve my coding (non)skills this year, so I'm glad I stumbled upon this group. I just signed up for the Codeacademy weekly email, but obviously I missed the first week (and perhaps the second). Would anyone be willing to forward them to me? 

I'm also a Simmons MLS, 2009. I have some experience with PHP and SQL, and some with Ruby on Rails. I've used a bit of javascript but don't have a very firm grasp. I'd like to feel more confident in my PHP skills by the end of the year. And I'm looking forward to having a supportive community to get me there! 

Laura

Andromeda Yelton's picture

I just got the 1st week's email last night.  If you go to http://www.codecademy.com/ it will get you started with the first lesson -- it's right there on the front page.  Will also prompt you to create the login you'll need to track your progress.

 

I hear Ruby is the new hotness, but I haven't looked into it at all.  Should I?

LITA Board of Directors, 2013-2016

http://andromedayelton.com

@ThatAndromeda

Owen Stephens (non-member)'s picture

I like Ruby, but whether you should look at it...? If it helps this post details why I decided to learn Ruby, and the other option I considered (Python) http://www.meanboyfriend.com/overdue_ideas/2010/04/something-kind-of-oo/

Andromeda Yelton's picture

Thanks!  I'm still trying to get my head around the object-oriented paradigm myself; your explanation helped.

 

My reasons for learning python were a lot less well-thought-out than yours -- I was bored, Google has a nice intro, Python is pretty -- but it turns out I now work at a Python shop so I've been using it a lot.  (MVC, another fun paradigm to get one's head around... ;)

LITA Board of Directors, 2013-2016

http://andromedayelton.com

@ThatAndromeda

Owen Stephens (non-member)'s picture

Actually doing some MVC (using Ruby on Rails) was on my "will find time to do over Xmas" list. I didn't :(

Wilhelmina Randtke's picture

Ruby has an active user community in Tallahassee and they are willing to explain things when I go to their meetings, which means I sometimes try to do simple things in it.  When I visited Miami and looked at meetup.com there, I noticed they also have an active user group.  Check meetup.com to see whether there is a Ruby on Rails group in your area.

Honestly, I have the conception that Python is more useful, because the libraries in it have a flavor that dovetails better with document management.

(but, of course, I don't know either language)

Roy Tennant's picture

I'm not here to learn coding so much as perhaps to help out here and there. I program some, although I'm mostly a hack instead of a professional. But I may be able to unstick people now and then. Also, if I could pick up more Javascript I wouldn't mind.

But what REALLY makes me happy is seeing so many women here. We need more women in the tech track of librarianship, so it's gratifying to see so many new grads going down that road. WE NEED YOU. Men have outnumbered women in library technology for too long. So I'm happy to do what I can to explain things if you get stuck.

Roy Tennant

OCLC Research

Heidi Steiner Burkhardt's picture

Hey all--I'm Heidi. Distance Learning Librarian at Norwich University. I've wanted to learn at least one coding language for a while and CodeYear seemed like a good way to get my feet wet. Sometimes I wonder why my English major self didn't realize CompSci was the real gold mine.

My web development class during my LIS program taught some JavaScript, so I'm able to vaguely understand it and look-up how to write things if necessary, but definitely can't do it off the top of my head. I'm pretty good with HTML and serviceable at CSS, but really want to expand my web development skills. Hope this proves to be a good little support group=).

-Heidi

Andromeda Yelton's picture

Yo, Heidi! :)

LITA Board of Directors, 2013-2016

http://andromedayelton.com

@ThatAndromeda

Jodie Gambill's picture

Hi! I'm Jodie, a Systems Librarian at Vanderbilt. 2007 Univ of Tennessee-Knoxville grad. Undergrad minor in Computer Science (Math major).  I mainly do php and mysql in my current job, with some perl scattered in there. As an extension of these, I find myself delving into a lot of css and js/jquery as well. I also have a lot of Drupal experience.

I was just thinking over the past few months how my code skills were getting rusty, and how I'd like to get more practice with some of the newer languages like Ruby and Python. Like you all, I also really need some formal javascript/jquery instruction. I basically find frameworks/code snippets online and tweak, rather than ground-up coding. I hope Code Year will be helpful to me in these interests! If not, even more advanced php techniques (i.e. OOP) would be great.  Oh, and I'm also really interested in mobile web app development, especially the responsive web design technique/movement.

I look forward to learning with you all!

Andromeda Yelton's picture

Math!!! Math!  I was a math major too :)  I love running into the other librarian math majors.  You know, all five of us :).  (I even did a summer of math research at UT-Knoxville!  Conrad Plaut was my advisor for that; was he still there when you were there?)

 

BTW since you are into responsive design, if you haven't seen Pablo Defendini's talk at last year's Books in Browsers yet, you will love it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3WXEgPU1zc

LITA Board of Directors, 2013-2016

http://andromedayelton.com

@ThatAndromeda

Jodie Gambill's picture

ooo thanks for the link - I will have to watch!

YAY math indeed!! :) No, there aren't many of us math people in libraryland. I tried being an actuary for a summer and hated it. And I definitely didn't want to teach (I didn't do the right degree for that anyway - pure math vs math educ).

I should have been more clear re: my education.  I did my MLS at UTK and graduated in 2007.  My undergrad was at a different school (Lipscomb, small private institution in Nashville).  So sadly, I don't know any UTK math people. :(

Have you found a good way to keep your math skills sharp? I feel all that calculus and discrete math floating out of my brain at a faster and faster rate as time goes on...

Andromeda Yelton's picture

Ahhh, OK. I probably should've read slower.  And not after bedtime.

 

I have not found a good way to keep math sharp, sadly :( It is so use it or lose it!  Occasionally I've reread an old textbook (mmm, Rudin) and it's definitely stuff I have to relearn, although I relearn it faster.  The pathways I carved in my brain as an undergrad are still there even if the details are not.

 

What I DO find is I use the skills all the time -- the logic, the ability to organize things, the ferocious instinct for holes in arguments and lapses in rigor.  But for most of the specifics, I'd have to be setting aside specific time to study (or find a way to use them at work, but that seems unlikely).  Sigh :(

LITA Board of Directors, 2013-2016

http://andromedayelton.com

@ThatAndromeda

Jodie Gambill's picture

What I DO find is I use the skills all the time -- the logic, the ability to organize things, the ferocious instinct for holes in arguments and lapses in rigor.  But for most of the specifics, I'd have to be setting aside specific time to study (or find a way to use them at work, but that seems unlikely).  Sigh :(

Yep. This exactly.

Lisa Kurt's picture

Have you tried Kahn Academy? I felt like it is fun and keeps you on your toes pretty well...though I'm not sure if they have discrete math. Might be worth checking out?

http://www.khanacademy.org/

Owen Stephens (non-member)'s picture

Also worth looking at Project Euler (I got stuck on problem 4!)

Andromeda Yelton's picture

Yeah, I've been trying to work up the gumption for that.

LITA Board of Directors, 2013-2016

http://andromedayelton.com

@ThatAndromeda

Jodie Gambill's picture

Both of these look very awesome...I need to spend some time with both!  Thanks for suggesting them.

Olalekan Abdulaziz (non-member)'s picture

Hi I'm Olalekan Abdulaziz,, a systems librarian at ARMTI, a graduate of library and information technology. i would like to learn about php and mysql and if possible a coding program.

i look forward to  a great learning experience.

 

Kristi Chadwick's picture

Thanks, Andromeda, for clueing me into this group!

I am a librarian for a consortium for central and western MA, with about 150 members. I head the Access Services Department, which is basically all the public end features: OPAC, webpages, reference databases and digital repository. We are migrating to a new ILS this year, and I really need a fast and somewhat dirty way to learn all this stuff I have been squeaking by on! Already six sections into Lesson 1 and I have a better handle than the online course I took for continuing education.

Nicole Pagowsky's picture

I'm an Instructional Services Librarian at the University of Arizona Libraries. I have a background with web design, so HTML/CSS, and clunked my way through some javascript, but that was more learning how to cut and paste what where to make certain things work.

We have programmers at the library, but there's a hope we can do some stuff on our own when making new instructional products, so I'm hoping to get a better understanding... or an understanding, period, of coding.

Andromeda Yelton's picture

Hey Nicole, glad you showed up :)  So what was that question you needed more than 140 characters for? :)

LITA Board of Directors, 2013-2016

http://andromedayelton.com

@ThatAndromeda

Toby Greenwalt's picture

Hi, I'm Toby Greenwalt, Virtual Services Coordinator at Skokie Public Library.

My job doesn't bring me directly in the code-line of code-fire, but a lot of what I do requires me to translate the needs of the public (and the non-techy staff) into terms our IT staff and web people can work with. (This is a two-way street of course, as I often have to translate why something's taking so long, or runs the risk of bringing down our entire server infrastructure.) As part of this, I've always had a working knowledge of the mechanics of code, but I've never taken the time to actually learn. 

I'm hoping Code Year can help to correct that. I'm 3/4 of the way through the week 1 lessons now, and I'm finding it really interesting. I can tell it's going to require me to reorder my typical thought processes - especially if I end up working with our IT staff on new projects. Looking forward to hearing from everyone else as they work through the exercises. 

Andromeda Yelton's picture

Toby!! Happy to see you here :).  I'd love to hear more about what you mean by reordering your thought processes!  (I bet that will be super-helpful in your (awesome) role as translator, too...)

LITA Board of Directors, 2013-2016

http://andromedayelton.com

@ThatAndromeda

Kate Kosturski's picture

Greetings from a very tired Kate in New Jersey.  I'm the European sales rep (official title: Institutional Sales Coordinator) for JSTOR in our shiny new offices in the Financial District in NYC. Pratt Institute SILS grad (2010) plus a BA in Government (or, as we used to call it, the BA in BS) from York College of PA. 

I have HTML and CSS background from a combination of self-teaching (remember Geocities, anyone?) and my Instructional Technologies course.  When I was unemployed last summer/fall, I took a free XML course from O'Reilly Media and createLIVE (which I really wish they would offer again, because it was awesome - we had one of the profs from the UW iSchool and he gave us the same lessons and homework assignments that he gave his students).  It's time to learn more, and you never know when it might come in handy at work.  

I heard about Code Year from a few people on Twitter, and then it popped up in my GOOD Magazine daily email.  I played around a bit on the site at work, but plan to devote time to it over the weekend. (Three day weekend, yay!)

In fact, at our sales workshop today, we had some presentations from our Advanced Technologies Group on their plans for the year, and one of them that I talked to afterwards was VERY excited I was doing Code Year.  He is looking into using some of the exercises for problem solving exercises on his team. (He then tried to recruit me to come over to his group.  Within earshot of one of our VPs.) 

-- 

Kate Kosturski

http://www.katekosturski.info

Jodie Gambill's picture

My self-teaching website was on Angelfire...ah, the 90s. :)

Coral Sheldon-Hess's picture

Mine was on Tripod. :) 

(Shockingly, it's still there!)  

--
Coral Sheldon-Hess
http://sheldon-hess.org/coral
@web_kunoichi

 

Andromeda Yelton's picture

Tripod still exists? o_O

LITA Board of Directors, 2013-2016

http://andromedayelton.com

@ThatAndromeda

Coral Sheldon-Hess's picture

I know, right? :)

--
Coral Sheldon-Hess
http://sheldon-hess.org/coral
@web_kunoichi

 

Coral Sheldon-Hess's picture

Mine was on Tripod. :) 

(Shockingly, it's still there!)  

--
Coral Sheldon-Hess
http://sheldon-hess.org/coral
@web_kunoichi

 

Wilhelmina Randtke's picture

Mine was on Tripod too, but sadly was suspended when I left the FTP connected and uploading files, said "man it's taking a long time", then went to sleep.  In the morning, when it was still uploading and not yet finished, I realized I tried to upload more than the allocated space.  Because I left it uploading for so long, Tripod blocked my username.  I should go back now to check total size of all files, because I'm pretty sure that all together they were pretty tiny in today's terms.

Lisa Kurt's picture

I'm stoked that so many librarians are getting into code and learning programming. I think it can only benefit our profession- whether it means we'll better understand our user's needs or hacking away on teh intarwebs ourselves- this is going to be awesome! 

I got my Simmons MLS in 2007- I was working at MIT Libraries in Serials Acquisitions back then but once I graduated I moved on to MassArt Library as a public services librarian. After a year I was kind of restless to move to another state (I was born and raised in MA but always thought it would be cool to live elsewhere). My husband and I both moved to Reno, NV where I am currently- at the University of Nevada, Reno- (my husband was the Applications Development Librarian but moved on out of libraries this past spring). Anyway- I began in 2008 as Head of E-Resources and Serials at UNR- then in July 2011 I got to do something totally different! I helped create a new position and new team- my present role is Emerging Technologies Librarian within the Emerging Technologies Team at UNR.

As for coding/programming...I took a web development and IA class at Simmons (html/css and some small bits o javascript). Since then, I've mainly played on my own- teaching myself Processing, Ruby/Ruby on Rails, bit of Python, and javascript. I'm taking a CS class this semester (lots of C++ coming my way) so I'm still what I consider beginner status but I'm learning a lot and want to learn more for sure.

My background is in art and design- I have a BFA in Design and Illustration from MassArt so I'm always interested in bringing my varied interests into libraries and making our profession more creative and innovative. 

Kate Kosturski's picture

For a few years anyway.  My boyfriend and I both are librarians - I got my MLS from Pratt, his from Southern CT State University.  He's an archivist for a 9/11 non-profit; I sell JSTOR.  We met at ALA Annual 2010 at the gaming night.  Needless to say, we talk shop A LOT. We have even presented together! 

-- 

Kate Kosturski

http://www.katekosturski.info

Laura DeMuro (non-member)'s picture

Hi I'm Laura I started playing with codeacdemy a few months ago, haven't had the time to really commit to it, hoping code year will help with that. It's great we have a support group where we can share our resources and shortcuts. 

Andromeda Yelton's picture

Hiya Laura!  I hope we can help you stick with it, too :)

LITA Board of Directors, 2013-2016

http://andromedayelton.com

@ThatAndromeda

Rebecca Oxley's picture

My name is Becca and I am a grad student at University of Maryland's iSchool studying concentrations in School Library Media and Information in Diverse Populations, and work as a graduate research associate at Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC).

I am the noobiest of the noobs: I have made a web page and website for a class a year ago and only remember the most basic of html. I'm here because I have always wanted to be able to do this for myself and think it will serve my professional future well. As a future school librarian, I want to make sure I am knowledgeable enough to teach coding to young people as a 21st Century skill.

Thanks again for hooking us all together Andromeda!!

Andromeda Yelton's picture

Woohoo, I'm glad we have noobest-noobs here!  I hope we can help you become a 21st-century-skills ninja :)  How are you liking the lessons thus far?

LITA Board of Directors, 2013-2016

http://andromedayelton.com

@ThatAndromeda

Rebecca Oxley's picture

I missed the first week (signed up too late), and have yet to get started on the second week. My big fear now is that I am so crunched for time I won't be able to keep up, but hey that's why they call them resolutions!

Rebecca Oxley's picture

Hey Andromeda your group invite just circulated through our listserv! Thas' some fine disseminatin' there.

Andromeda Yelton's picture

Woohoo, glad to hear it!  And you aren't too behind if you haven't done week 1 yet -- it's only a few hours -- you can catch up fast :).  I haven't started week 2 myself.

LITA Board of Directors, 2013-2016

http://andromedayelton.com

@ThatAndromeda

Susan Wilber (non-member)'s picture

I'm Susan and I work for a consortium of academic libraries and my focus in on creating management reports. My one and only resolution for this year was to upgrade my tech skills. Sad to say that my primary motivation is personal - under informed legislative staff stared a process which may well lead to the undoing of a lot of excellent services and force some very talented people into the job market. That said, I also want to aquire skills that can enhance my ability to perform my current job responsibilities. I identified two languages that would help - javascript or pl/sql. Finding Code Year was the perfect twist of fate.

Like the rest of you it may be hard to find the time to keep up but I'm determined and am anxious to hear from everyone on their progress and especially how they apply what they've learned to our world of libraries.

Andromeda Yelton's picture

Welcome to the community!

LITA Board of Directors, 2013-2016

http://andromedayelton.com

@ThatAndromeda

Emily Wood's picture

I'm Emily Wood, I'm a Faculty Librarian at Pierce College in Washington State [my ALAConnect profile is probably displaying outdated info].  

I had some courses in my MSIS program at University of Texas at Austin iSchool (2009), that required coding, but it was mostly self-taught HTML, CSS and veeeery basic PHP, which I've forgotten by now.  I don't encounter a need for coding in my daily work (or if I do need it, it's simple HTML), but I think practicing coding and learning how the back end of things work will help me better explain the web to my patrons.

Plus I really like solving puzzles, so that's why I find Code Year so much fun!

Last week I completed all 3 of Codecademy's standard courses, which was helpful to have that fresh in my mind when I got the Fizz Buzz lesson.  Javascript, I imagine, is like any other language:  if you don't use it, you lose it.  I'm looking forward to more practice this year.  

BTW: Does anyone know of any good interactive practice tutorials for Ruby on Rails?

Laura Rancani's picture

Nice to meet you all! I'm Laura Rancani. I currently provide academic hourly cataloging support at the University of Illinois Library's Content Access Management department, where I process children's and YA materials, e-books, and digital images. This semester I'm also serving as a teaching assistant for one section of Cataloging & Classification at the Graduate School of Library & Information Science. Like several others here, my coding experience is limited to basic and mostly self-taught HTML, CSS, and PHP. My interest in learning about more about coding dates back to my teenage years, when I spent many hours tinkering with HTML, building very basic pages to showcase my various Photoshop creations and enthusiastic rambling about my favorite bands.

I found out about Code Year thanks to my YALSA mentor, Dawn Rutherford, and thought it was a perfect way to jumpstart my tech learning this year while sharing the experience with others. Looking forward to delving into the courses and reading your posts along the way! I'm planning to post tidbits about Code Year on Twitter @teabrarian and on my blog throughout the year, so feel free to visit.

Andromeda Yelton's picture

Ooh, that's fun that you'll be blogging about it.  I'll have to keep an eye out for that :)

LITA Board of Directors, 2013-2016

http://andromedayelton.com

@ThatAndromeda

Andromeda Yelton's picture

Hi Emily! :)  Puzzles *are* fun, huh.  (and I bet you can find excuses to use code in your everyday work once you know enough code! ;) Robot servants are awesome.)

 

I don't know any Ruby but if you find one I want to know, too.  Owen (also in this community) knows some Ruby, so maybe ask him?

LITA Board of Directors, 2013-2016

http://andromedayelton.com

@ThatAndromeda

Carli Spina's picture

Hi Emily,

I'm not sure exactly what you are hoping to practice, but I have tried RubyMonk (http://rubymonk.com/) some and found it interesting.  I have also read about Hackety Hack (http://hackety.com/) and Kids Ruby (http://kidsruby.com/), though I haven't tried either of them.  Let me know if you try either of them and find them helpful. I have just been starting to learn Ruby, but I am hoping to learn more in the future.

Best,

Carli

Carli Spina's picture

Oh, one more suggestion, though it isn't an interactive tutorial.  I have read good things about Ruby on Rails Tutorial (http://ruby.railstutorial.org/) which has both a book and a video option, though it isn't free.

Emily Wood's picture

Thanks, Carli.  I'll have to check those suggestions out sometime.  I think I'll start slow with #codeyear, then hopefully graduate to RoR.  Just finished Week 2 courses!

Nicole Brock's picture

Hi all...I'm Nicole. Currently working in a non-profit organization in Indianapolis, about 40% of the time in the organization's special library. I'm looking for a new challenge, primarily in the form of a new job, but am pursuing things like Code Year to keep gaining skills! I don't know much about programming outside HTML and CSS, so even a basic overview of the rest should tell me whether I want to pursue more in-depth knowledge. Looking forward to having a support group, as I've noticed the built-in hints aren't always very helpful!

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