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ALSC (Charlemae) Rollins President's Program Committee (Association for Library Service to Children)

Online Doc CRPP Quarterly Report - Feb 2017

by Linda Ernst on Wed, Feb 22, 2017 at 03:09 pm

 

Reporting   Period*:

February   15

Name   of Committee or Task Force*:

Charlemae   Rollins President's Program Planning Committee

Priority   Group Area *:

Organizational   Support (PGC IV)

Current   Chair(s)*:

 

Reporting   Period*:

February   15

Name   of Committee or Task Force*:

Charlemae   Rollins President's Program Planning Committee

Priority   Group Area *:

Organizational   Support (PGC IV)

Current   Chair(s)*:

Linda   Ernst, Christopher Brown

Chair's   Email*:

lindaern@kcls.org

Co-Chair's   email (if applicable):

cabrown224@gmail.com

Incoming   Chair (if known):

N/A

Committee/Task   Force Members (names only)*:

Linda   Ernst & Christopher Brown are the members of this committee.

Per   the Division Leadership Manual, the committee is expected to annually review   its function statement to ensure the charge meets the responsibilities of the   priority group area, recent changes to the professional environment, and   facilitates the implementation of the ALSC Strategic Plan. When did you last   review it with your committee? Note: Recommendations for changes should be   submitted to Organization & Bylaws. :

February   15 Reporting Period

Summarize   work accomplished, decisions reached, and follow-up action needed   (objectives, timetable, and assignments) since your last report. Please   remember not to include confidential or sensitive information.*:

Topics   covered:
  • Items to be given away at the program: USB wristband and contents (CRPP   program booklet, bios & contact info of speakers, Quicklist - books,   resources – online & journals, tip sheet for librarians, possible note   from ALSC Pres. Betsy as to why she picked this topic, button patterns -see   ALSC advocacy idea), raffle of ALA publication Becoming a Media Mentor,   discount coupon for all attendees for Becoming a Media Mentor
  • CRPP program booklet contents and due date (May 2017)
  • Schedule for publicity to be sent out: two entries for ALSC Matters   (quarterly release) and 6 short “teasers” for ALSC update beginning 6 weeks   prior to ALA Annual Conference.
  • Checked on “who does what” for speakers, logistics, rooms, etc.
  • Conference call to be set up for March/April with speakers & committee   to review content and logistics (Linda, Christopher and Kristen)
  • Tentative assignments for program - Betsy&/or Linda: welcome &   overview of program, program speakers, Q & A (Christopher online),   conclusion, raffle.

Please   do not copy a.../Advocacy:

We   are also creating a resource through the program (and subsequent webinar)   that increases the value of excellent library services for all children,   including special needs individuals, and the vital role youth services   librarians and trained library workers serve as media mentors.

Please   do not copy a.../Education:

The   CRPP meets all the objectives of our educational goal. It will enhance access   and content offered through professional development; will expand the   education opportunities of youth services librarians on new and emerging   technologies; expands training opportunities; helps to reach and reflect our   increasingly diverse communities and their needs; and promotes the finest   digital and emerging format materials to caregivers.

Please   do not copy a.../Access to Library Services:

The   CRPP will increase educational opportunities to helping patrons and youth   services librarians overcome barriers to library services in digital and   emerging media formats; increase advocacy for technology funding for   children's services; and provide innovative models for enhancing   librarian-community relationships and community participation in youth   literacy. It will also be providing additional resources for librarians who   want to know more.

An   ALSC core value is collaboration. Please describe collaborations you have   initiated or would like to initiate with other ALSC or ALA committees to help   further your work. Please list the desired outcomes you envision from   this/these collaboration(s). What are the next steps you have set to   accomplish this? What assistance do you need in taking this forward?:

We   are working with the Quicklists Committee to create a booklet of resources   for the program. We are also advertising this program in ALSC Matters, on the   ALSC Blog and as a press release on the ALA homepage. Intend to contact ALSC   committee on Library Service to Special Population Children and Their   Caregivers Committee so see if they have anything to contribute.

Please   describe activities you would like to pursue for future education topics,   publications, or online resources (such as toolkits) to be developed based on   the committee’s work? What are the next steps you have set to accomplish   this? What assistance do you need in taking this forward? Please be as   detailed as possible.:

In   addition to the topic which was included in the previous quarterly report   (see below), another topic emerged. This topic is the impact of technology   and the special needs child/patron and how to assist these families in   becoming media literate. We are investigating resources to address this topic   on our resource guide.
  The topic of Media Mentor-ship is ripe for exploration, although the term   "Media Mentor" may not be the most appropriate as it seems   relatively unknown among librarians and youth services library workers. What   are the best practices of a Media Mentor? What skills can be developed to   help established librarians and new librarians train themselves and each   other to provide a "reader's advisory" on digital works and   emerging media formats? These are the questions we should consider moving   forward.

If   you could recommend a research topic, pertaining to the realm of your   committee’s work, to an academic colleague, what would you request s/he   research and why? (In other words, what gaps in research do you see in this   particular area so that ALSC can share with the Association for Library and   Information Science Educators and/or help develop ALSC's own research   agenda?):

In   addition to the previously mentioned topic of needing to understand the term   "Media Mentor" included in the previous quarterly report, another   topic emerged. This topic is the impact of technology and the special needs   child/patron and how to assist these families in becoming media literate. We   are investigating resources to include that address this topic on our   resource guide.

If   you are a virtual committee or task force, what is your primary method for   holding meetings or communicating?:

 

When   you communicate electronically, how are you preserving the work of the   committee for the next committee?*:

Saving   emails in folder to forward to next chair., Chair is printing copies of   substantive email to send to the ALSC office for the archive.

Did   you attend or watch the online committee/task force orientation? http://www.ala.org/alsc/aboutalsc/coms.*:

Yes

If   you are the chair of a virtual committee/task force, have you reviewed the   resources available in the Best Practices for Virtual Committee Work wiki? http://www.ala.org/alsc/aboutalsc/coms*:

Not   applicable (primarily meet face-to-face)

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The Picture Books for Young Adults Interest Group

Online Doc Picture-Book Refugee and Immigration Stories from Booklist Magazine

by Diane Colson on Wed, Feb 8, 2017 at 11:38 am

Core Collection: Picture-Book Refugee and Immigration Stories

by Sarah Hunter

Core Collection: Picture-Book Refugee and Immigration Stories

by Sarah Hunter

The world is a complicated place, sometimes even a terrifying one, and although the impulse to protect children from the ugly parts of the world is natural, the prevalence of news reports and photojournalism means it’s unlikely they’ll be in the dark for long. As kids encounter immigrants and refugees in the news, their neighborhoods, or their classrooms and inevitably begin to ask questions, a picture book can be a perfect way to start a conversation. And for children who may have experienced similar events first hand, a picture book might offer some much-needed comfort or solidarity. Taking various approaches to the material, from artistically ambiguous to movingly candid, the following titles—picture book in format but aimed at a range of ages—tell stories of contemporary immigrants and refugees seeking out a place to safely call home. They might not answer all the questions, but they’ll certainly get kids thinking.

Adrift at Sea: A Vietnamese Boy’s Story of Survival. By Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch and Tuan Ho. Illus. by Brian Deines. 2016. Pajama, $18.95 (9781772780055). Gr. 3–5.

In this picture book for somewhat older readers, Ho narrates the story of his perilous escape from postwar Vietnam, in 1981, describing his pain at leaving behind loved ones and relief upon being rescued by an American aircraft carrier after six days adrift on the ocean. The text is terse and unembellished, leaving the rich images to capture the emotional events. Photographs of the family bookend the story and remind readers of the events’ reality.

Four Feet, Two Sandals. By Karen Lynn Williams and Khadra Mohammed. Illus. by Doug Chayka. 2007. Eerdmans, $17 (9780802852960). Gr. 1–3.

In a refugee camp on the Afghanistan-Pakistan border, Lina, 10, finds one sandal that fits her perfectly, but Feroza is wearing the other one. They eventually decide to each wear both sandals on alternate days and become friends, but they must part when Lina and her mother get to go to America. With evocative paintings and a moving tale of sharing and hope, this is the personal drama behind the daily news. Williams and Mohammed offer a similarly moving story about a Sudanese refugee adjusting to life in America in My Name Is Sangoel (2009).

The Journey. By Francesca Sanna. Illus. by the author. 2016. Flying Eye, $17.95 (9781909263994). K–Gr. 2.

In a bright palette and playful visual style belying the serious subject matter, Sanna tells the story of a mother and her two children fleeing an unnamed, war-torn country to seek safety in a land of high mountains and friendly creatures. The straightforward text and fairy-tale-style artwork make this heartbreaking, scary, yet hopeful story beautifully captivating.

Mama’s Nightingale: A Story of Immigration and Separation. By Edwidge Danticat. Illus. by Leslie Staub. 2015. Dial, $17.99 (9780525428091). K–Gr. 3.

Saya’s mother is in a detention center because she doesn’t have the right “papers.” Although Saya can visit her, she wants Mama home. Staub’s warm, swirling illustrations depict Saya’s mother comfortingly floating above her as she recalls her mother’s fanciful stories and comes up with an inspiring solution. Danticat’s endnotes remind readers that this is a story based in reality.

Migrant. By José Manual Mateo. Illus. by Javier Martínez Pedro. 2014. Abrams, $17.95 (9781419709579). Gr. 2–5.

In this accordion-fold picture book, appropriate for middle-graders, Mateo and Pedro present a single, extended childlike drawing packed with minute details, which move from crowded village life through a harrowing train journey to a modern cityscape, all the while accompanied by the story of a young, undocumented boy migrating to Los Angeles. This striking, empathetic look at a difficult issue is presented in both English and Spanish.

My Shoes and I. By René Colato Laínez. Illus. by Fabrico Vanden Broeck. 2010. Boyds Mills, $16.95 (9781590783856). Gr. 2–4.

Mario’s mother sends him a new pair of shoes for his walk from El Salvador to the U.S., where he will join her. The shoes grow filthy, develop holes, and wear down, but Mario and his father finally ford a river and join his mother in the U.S. The grainy illustrations portray the story, pitched for middle-graders, from a variety of perspectives but focus on the shoes, as a symbol of Mario’s journey.

Somos como las nubes / We Are Like the Clouds. By Jorge Argueta. Illus. by Alfonso Ruano. Tr. by Elisa Amado. 2016. Groundwood, $18.95 (9781554988495). Gr. 5–9.

Argueta’s collection of carefully crafted, first-person, bilingual poems centers around the experiences of unaccompanied minors from Central America making the dangerous trek to the U.S. in search of their families and a safer life. Together with Ruano’s expressive paintings, Argueta’s poems, ideal for all older middle-school audiences, offer a unique and much-needed perspective on the reasons driving young people to immigrate to the U.S.

A Song for Cambodia. By Michelle Lord. Illus. by Shino Arihara. 2008. Lee & Low, $16.95 (9781600601392). Gr. 3–5.

This picture-book biography for middle-grade readers traces the childhood of Arn Chorn, who survived a Khmer Rouge work camp by learning to play a traditional Cambodian instrument. After many terrors, he’s eventually brought to America and adopted, and though he adjusts to his new country, his music keeps him connected to his homeland. Arihara’s realistic paintings, which steer clear of graphic violence, enliven Lord’s text.

Stepping Stones: A Refugee Family’s Journey. By Margriet Ruurs. Illus. by Nizar Ali Badr. 2016. Orca, $20 (9781459814905). Gr. 3–6.

The story of fictional Rama’s life in Syria before war forced her family to flee is an all too common one. First their lives are curtailed by political oppression, then violent warfare. Written in English and Arabic, the verses of Rama’s poetry teem with tangible detail, but it’s the illustrations—tableaux composed of rocks and pebbles—that will most fascinate middle-school readers.

Teacup. By Rebecca Young. Illus. by Matt Ottley. 2016. Dial, $17.99 (9780735227774). PreS–Gr. 2.

With a bundle of belongings, including a teacup containing earth from his homeland, a boy sets sail alone. As time passes, the cup sprouts an apple tree, which sustains him until he finds a place to land. Though the journey sometimes seems like a metaphor for growing up, the stunning illustrations contain subtle hints about turmoil in the boy’s homeland, suggesting connections to immigration stories as well.

Their Great Gift: Courage, Sacrifice, and Hope in a New Land. By John Coy. 2016. Carolrhoda, $19.99 (9781467780544). PreS–Gr. 2.

Wing Young Huie’s moving photos capture immigrant families in a variety of modern contexts, while Coy’s words emphasize common experiences of newcomers to this U.S. The powerful message of the words and pictures together reminds readers that immigrants are not just brand-new transplants in their neighborhoods; in some cases, they are the progenitors of many American families.

A Thirst for Home: A Story of Water across the World. By Christine Ieronimo. Illus. by Eric Velasquez. 2014. Bloomsbury, $17.99 (9780802723079). Gr. 4–6.

This hauntingly bittersweet tale, good for middle-graders, imagines the heartbreak of a mother and daughter forced apart by hunger and poverty. Eva longs for her biological mother, Emaye, but feels real security with her adoptive family in America. Velasquez’s light-infused illustrations capture the quiet dignity of Emaye’s grief and Eva’s tentative acceptance and perfectly complement the tender tone of the text.

Two White Rabbits. By Jairo Buitrago. Illus. by Rafael Yockteng. Tr. by Elisa Amado. 2015. Groundwood, $18.95 (9781554987412). K–Gr. 2.

The slow pace of this immigration story (also available in a Spanish edition) matches the steady tread of a girl and her father as they embark on a journey of immigration on foot, by raft, and atop trains, moving day and night through deserts and fields. The multimedia illustrations use saturated earth tones to render these anonymous people beautifully real. Though they have no names or a place to call home, there is no doubt that they count.

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ACRL Government Relations Committee

Online Doc watching House Education and the Workforce Committee

by Virginia Pierce on Tue, Feb 21, 2017 at 03:21 pm

ACRL Legislative Agenda 2017 draft

Watch List_Pierce

Activities of the Congressional House Education and the Workforce Committee

ACRL Legislative Agenda 2017 draft

Watch List_Pierce

Activities of the Congressional House Education and the Workforce Committee

The House Committee on Education and the Workforce, chaired byCongresswoman Virginia Foxx (R-NC), works on issues relating to the U.S. Education system and Workforce and provides oversight of policies administered by the U.S. Departments of Labor, Education, Agriculture, and Health and Human Services. The Subcommittee on Higher Education and Workforce Development, chaired byRepresentative Brett Guthrie (R-KY), covers issues on post-secondary education. Some of the issues for which they have jurisdiction are: the Higher Education Act, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, all programs relating to museums and library services, and postsecondary career and technical education. In February 2017, Betsy DeVos, was confirmed as the new the U.S. Secretary of Education.

In the incoming 115th Congress, several bills have been introduced and have been referred to the House Education and the Workforce Committee. These and any new bills or regulations will continue to be monitored. The most recent hearing which took place was held on February 7th called “Challenges and Opportunities in Higher Education.”

At the present time, there appear to be no direct or obvious impacts to academic libraries in legislative or regulatory proposals by the House Committee on Education and the Workforce and Higher Education Issues.  We will continue to monitor as issues may arise later in the year.

 

To follow:

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ACRL Government Relations Committee

Online Doc From Midwinter--Barbara attended the Legislative update and here are the pertinent points

by Clay Williams on Tue, Feb 21, 2017 at 11:11 am

Agenda 

 

  • Government surveillance
  • Net Neutrality
  • Copyright (DMCA exceptions, Register of Copyrights Office)
  • Privacy (Email privacy, Executive order 12333)
  • HEA reauthorization

 

 

Watchlist

 

Agenda 

 

  • Government surveillance
  • Net Neutrality
  • Copyright (DMCA exceptions, Register of Copyrights Office)
  • Privacy (Email privacy, Executive order 12333)
  • HEA reauthorization

 

 

Watchlist

 

  • FASTR
  • Marakesh Treaty (part of copyright?)
  • De-funding Concerns (NEH, NIH) 
  • Data collection and dissemination (NCES,  EPA, etc.)

Here's an article:  Information lockdown hits Trump’s federal agencies  (from Politico, 01/24/17, cited in The Chronicle 2/2/2017)

"Federal agencies are clamping down on public information and social media in the early days of Donald Trump's presidency...."

The steps to mute federal employees — seen to varying degrees in the Environmental Protection Agency and the departments of the Interior, Transportation, Agriculture and Health and Human Services — are sparking early fears of a broader crackdown across the government, as Trump vows to pursue an agenda sharply at odds with his predecessor."

  • Campus Carry Laws / CDC research on gun violence

 

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Spectrum & Diversity Scholars Community

Online Doc Upcoming 2017 scholarship deadlines for library and information science graduate education

by Gwendolyn Prellwitz (staff) on Tue, Feb 21, 2017 at 10:50 am

Upcoming 2017 Scholarship Deadlines for Library and Information Science Graduate Students:   

Upcoming 2017 Scholarship Deadlines for Library and Information Science Graduate Students:   

Additional Scholarship Opportunities without currently posted 2017 deadlines

 

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ACRL Government Relations Committee

Online Doc DRAFT Minutes Govt Relations ALAMidwinter Meeting

by Barbara Petersohn on Mon, Feb 20, 2017 at 12:42 pm

[Draft]

ACRL Government Relations Committee

Minutes

ALA Midwinter - January 22, 2017

Westin Peachtree Plaza Hotel, Ansley Room 5

 

Present: John Sandstrom, Kara Malenfant (Washington Office), Barbara Petersohn (vice-chair), Phil Kraus (visitor), LeRoy LaFleur (Board Liaison)

[Draft]

ACRL Government Relations Committee

Minutes

ALA Midwinter - January 22, 2017

Westin Peachtree Plaza Hotel, Ansley Room 5

 

Present: John Sandstrom, Kara Malenfant (Washington Office), Barbara Petersohn (vice-chair), Phil Kraus (visitor), LeRoy LaFleur (Board Liaison)

  1. Barbara called the meeting to order at 1 pm.
  2. Welcome and introductions (all)
  3. Barbara reviewed timeline and deadlines for the committee for 2017.
  4. Barbara reported sending out requests to ACRL committee chairs for input on the agenda in December; committees had until January 27, 2017 to respond.  She read responses received to date and suggested that these be incorporated into the draft list of legislative agenda items and Watch list items.  All agreed.
  5. The group reviewed and discussed items on the previous year’s agenda and watch list, along with the input from other ACRL committees and our brainstorming in December, in order to continue to develop a working list of 2017 Agenda and Watch list items to use in creating a final version at the meeting in February.
  6. Barbara will pass the working list to Clay to share with the rest of the committee for the next meeting.
  7. The meeting was adjourned at 2:10 pm.
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