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RUSA Board of Directors

Discussion Agenda, RUSA Board, July 27, 2017

by Chris LeBeau on Mon, Jul 24, 2017 at 10:33 pm

Draft

1:00 PM CDT

Draft

1:00 PM CDT

Access link: http://connect.ala.org/node/268918
Optional call-in number: 1-866-718-7314
Participant Code: 92491678#

 
1. Approval of Agenda - LEBEAU

2. NEW BUSINESS / BOARD ACTION ITEMS :

2a. Appoint Restructuring Implementation Task Force/Charge - C. LEBEAU

2b. Proposal to change "RUSA Quarterly Update" to "RUSA Section Update" - C. SCHUETZ

2c. Conference Planning - ALA's Remodel Schedule - C. LEBEAU

3. DISCUSSION/ANNOUNCEMENTS:

3a. Standard Board Meeting time- C. LEBEAU

3b. RUSA Executive Director Search update - A. MCMANUS

3c. Charges for New Committees - update - B. GERMAN

3d. Emerging Leader assignment - C. LEBEAU

3e. Diversity Topic - A. MCMANUS

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The Picture Books for Young Adults Interest Group

Discussion Booklist - Top Ten Humorous Picture Books

by Diane Colson on Tue, Jul 11, 2017 at 03:41 pm

Hello all,

Although I had mentioned posted Booklink's picture book mystery list, it really is geared towards a pretty young audience. More useful to us, I think, is Maggie Reagan's list in the current issue of Booklist on the Top 10 Humorous Picture books. Here's are her picks, with apologies for the awkward formatting:

Top 10 Humorous Picture Books.

Reagan, Maggie (author).

Hello all,

Although I had mentioned posted Booklink's picture book mystery list, it really is geared towards a pretty young audience. More useful to us, I think, is Maggie Reagan's list in the current issue of Booklist on the Top 10 Humorous Picture books. Here's are her picks, with apologies for the awkward formatting:

Top 10 Humorous Picture Books.

Reagan, Maggie (author).

FEATURE.  First published July, 2017 (Booklist).

From the dryly witty to the sidesplittingly hilarious, these funny picture books, reviewed in Booklist between July 2016 and June 2017, provide a bundle of laughs for all.

Creepy Pair of Underwear! By Aaron Reynolds. Illus. by Peter Brown. Aug. 2017. Simon & Schuster, $17.99 (9781442402980). K–Gr. 3.

Jasper Rabbit doesn’t realize that his prized new undies glow, until the bedroom lights go out. His dismay quickly changes to terror after he stuffs them in the laundry hamper—and, horror of horrors, wakes up wearing them again.

Du Iz Tak? By Carson Ellis. Illus. by the author. 2016. Candlewick, $16.99 (9780763665302). PreS–Gr. 2.

A few bugs discover a green shoot sprouting from the ground and, in their own gibberish language, discuss. Visual cues in splendid folk-style illustrations allow readers to draw meaning from the hilariously nonsensical dialogue.

How to Be a HeroBy Florence Parry Heide. Illus. by Chuck Groenink. 2016. Chronicle, $16.99 (9781452127101). PreS–Gr. 1.

Fairy-tale-obsessed Gideon keeps a constant eye out for his chance to be a hero. Readers will chuckle watching the caped boy, who’s so focused that he misses glaringly obvious opportunities to help.

The Legend of Rock Paper ScissorsBy Drew Daywalt. Illus. by Adam Rex. 2017. HarperCollins/Balzer+Bray, $17.99 (9780062438898). PreS–Gr. 1.

This madcap origin story presents Rock, Paper, and Scissors as three mighty warriors. The earnest gravity of the fighters’ quests pairs with the melodramatic tone to produce a brand of purely absurd, sidesplitting humor.

Lexie the Word Wrangler. By Rebecca Van Slyke. Illus. by Jessie Hartland. 2017. Penguin/Nancy Paulsen, $17.99 (9780399169571). K–Gr. 3.

Lexie ties words together and herds them into sentences. But a missing d turns Lexie’s bandana into a banana: a word rustler is on the loose! Droll and playful wordplay will impress teachers and readers alike.

Little Red and the Very Hungry Lion. By Alex T. Smith. Illus. by the author. 2016. Scholastic, $16.99 (9780545914383). K–Gr. 2.

Little Red marches off through the African bush to deliver medicine to her aunt—but who’s that behind her? Warm colors, fantastic comic timing, and a twist ending infuse this updated tale with humor.

Nanette’s Baguette. By Mo Willems. Illus. by the author. 2016. Hyperion, $17.99 (9781484722862). PreS–K.

Nanette, a young frog, is sent to pick up a baguette but ends up devouring it. Full of regret, Nanette contemplates moving to Tibet, but, luckily, Mom understands. Delicious wordplay and delightful illustrations convey energy, emotion, and hilarity.

Rudas: Niño’s Horrendous Hermanitas. By Yuyi Morales. Illus. by the author. 2016. Roaring Brook/Neal Porter, $17.99 (9781626722408). PreS–Gr. 1.

Little luchador Niño faces off against his little sisters, and they fight dirty. They tattle, screech, and scream—until Niño cleverly traps them and calms them with a book. English-Spanish text and hilarious pictures depict the spectacular battle.

TriangleBy Mac Barnett. Illus. by Jon Klassen. 2017. Candlewick, $15.99 (9780763696030). PreS–Gr. 1.

Triangle is up to no good: a prank on his friend Square. Square fails to see the humor and chases the tricky Triangle back to his triangle-shaped house, where the tables are hilariously turned.

A Well-Mannered Young WolfBy Jean Leroy. Illus. by Matthieu Maudet. 2016. Eerdmans, $16 (9780802854797). PreS–Gr. 2.

A young wolf catches a rabbit and politely offers a last wish—only to have the rabbit break his promise to stay put. This understatedly humorous tale of politeness gone awry even sports a twist ending.

 

She isn't focusing on a young adult audience, although several of the books she mentions work well with that age group. 

What is missing here? What are the books that you have used with tweens and teens to make them laugh? Or...which of the books listed above are already on your go-to list?

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Spectrum & Diversity Scholars Community

Discussion Scholarly Engagement Librarian for Social Sciences and Data, Tulane University, Howard-Tilton Memorial Library

by Gwendolyn Prellwitz (staff) on Mon, Jul 24, 2017 at 03:30 pm

Howard Tilton Memorial Library (HTML) at Tulane University invites applications for the position of Scholarly Engagement Librarian for Social Sciences and Data Librarian. The library seeks to build its professional staff by recruiting talented, energetic librarians interested in shaping the future of Tulane University and New Orleans.  The Systems Librarian will combine a strong service orientation with application development to ensure that HTML maintains and builds upon the high level of services for which it is renowned.

Posting Summary

Howard Tilton Memorial Library (HTML) at Tulane University invites applications for the position of Scholarly Engagement Librarian for Social Sciences and Data Librarian. The library seeks to build its professional staff by recruiting talented, energetic librarians interested in shaping the future of Tulane University and New Orleans.  The Systems Librarian will combine a strong service orientation with application development to ensure that HTML maintains and builds upon the high level of services for which it is renowned.

Posting Summary

The Scholarly Engagement Librarian for Social Sciences and Data supports faculty and students in Tulane University’s social sciences departments in the discovery, analysis, and representation of information resources.  Reporting to the Director of User Services and Library IT, s/he provides Tulane students and faculty with guidance on the discovery, evaluation, and use of social science information resources, including datasets and data repositories such as ICPSR.  S/he also provides instruction on statistical and qualitative analysis software.  The Social Sciences and Data Librarian teaches in the course-integrated library instruction and workshop program, provides research consultations, and prepares online guides, video tutorials, or other instruction aids as appropriate.  S/he handles collection development for assigned social sciences subject areas.  S/he will participate in the Scholarly Engagement Instruction and Digital Scholarship groups and collaborate with liaisons to integrate quantitative social science methodologies and data reference into liaison services.  S/he collaborates with counterparts in the humanities and sciences to ensure a consistent approach to instruction, research support, and outreach, and s/he collaborates with the Coordinator for Scholarly Resources in Social Sciences to provide and promote social science-related workshops.  The Social Sciences and Data Librarian, with colleagues, uses a team approach to fulfil the library’s mission in an era of fast-evolving information needs.  

Librarians are expected to develop expertise in emerging technologies and lead and/or participate in innovative library projects.

REQUIRED EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:

  • ALA-accredited MLS with an academic background in social sciences at the time of hire; OR a graduate degree in the social sciences and 2 or more years of relevant academic library experience

REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, ABILITIES/COMPETENCIES TYPICALLY NEEDED TO PERFORM THIS JOB SUCCESSFULLY:

  • Knowledge of library research tools relevant to the social sciences; related reference and research consultation experience.
  • Knowledge of quantitative and/or qualitative Social Sciences and Data resources.
  • Understanding of the academic research process and the ways that new technologies are affecting the production of scholarship in the social sciences.
  • Ability to identify, obtain, and prepare datasets for quantitative research in the social sciences, and knowledge of statistical-quantitative methods of analysis.
  • Knowledge of one or more quantitative research/statistical software tools, such as STATA, SPSS, SAS, R, or ArcGIS.
  • Experience in the use or support of published data repositories such as ICPSR.
  • Familiarity with one or more visualization tools such as InstantAtlas, Dygraphs, or Tableau.
  • A strong commitment to user service and creative, engaging outreach.
  • Understanding of academic library collection development, including financial management.
  • Strong interpersonal, communications, and organizational skills.
  • Demonstrated ability to work collaboratively with faculty, students, technology professionals, and library colleagues.

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Experience working with U.S. Census Data.
  • Experience working with cartographic materials.
  • One year of teaching using instructional design, lesson planning, and assessment.
  • One year of collection development in an academic library.

To Apply. To apply for this position please go to Tulane University Jobs IRC12297. To ensure full consideration, applicants must submit a letter of application, resume, and the names with full contact information of at least three professional references. Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until a suitable candidate is selected.

Tulane University is an AA/EO Employer. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply.

Tulane is an EOE/M/F/Vet/Disabled employer.

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ALSC (Association for Library Service to Children)

Online Doc Preschool Discussion Group 2017 ALA Annual Report

by Linda Ernst on Mon, Jul 24, 2017 at 02:29 pm

NAME OF DISCUSSION GROUP:__Preschool Services Discussion Group__________

DISCUSSION GROUP CONVENOR/S:_Linda L. Ernst & Sue McCleaf Nespeca______

 

DISCUSSION TOPIC:  

 

Two for One Special!

NAME OF DISCUSSION GROUP:__Preschool Services Discussion Group__________

DISCUSSION GROUP CONVENOR/S:_Linda L. Ernst & Sue McCleaf Nespeca______

 

DISCUSSION TOPIC:  

 

Two for One Special!

STORY WALKS PRESCHOOL and Preschool STORYTIME CHALLENGES! 

 

SUMMARY OF DISCUSSION:

Preschool Services Discussion Group

ALA Annual – Chicago, IL

Sunday, June 25, 2017

1:00pm-2:30pm

Hilton Chicago, Lake Erie

 

Topic: STORY WALKS

 

How do you set up a story walk? What are the ins and outs to make it a success? How can you use Story Walks in other locations to attract different audiences?

Speaker: Ashley Waring, MLS; Assistant Director; Reading Public Library, MA

Meeting Notes:

Speaker: Story Walk is trademarked by Anne Ferguson in Montpelier, Vermont. If you use the term, you may need to contact them, or use a disclaimer. Ashley explained that they did their Story Walks based on the booklet by the Boston Children’s Museum and did the program in various places such as: conservation lands, at shopping centers and in downtown store windows. They have done five so far. They do StoryWalks during school breaks and keep it up for two weeks. Example: Tree lighting walk. Families went from shop to shop. Story was Elves and Shoemaker. Bought two copies of the book and took apart. Ordered on Amazon, used copies in good condition. Pages were hard core laminated (use 10-milliitrel laminator sheets for durability). It is important for the pages to be stiff and weatherproof. Each stake was labelled with “Property of… Return to….” Labeling is important so these items were not thrown away at shops, etc.  A logbook was kept at the last page’s location --- people signed if they participated, so library would have stats. If they signed, they were also entered into a raffle. StoryWalk was advertised thorough: electronic signs in library, on library calendar, local newspapers, press releases, local school districts. The first page would explain what StoryWalk was, how it works, and credit the library. Then on the bottom of each page they would have the library logo. It also gave directions telling them how to proceed through the story, with arrows giving directions. Some pages were under Plexiglas.

The link below will give you the whole booklet about “Building Literacy Skills through StoryWalk” from the Boston Children’s Museum and provides guidelines & suggestions.

http://www.bostonchildrensmuseum.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/rttt/storywalk/storywalk_v3web.pdf

Variations:

  • “Everybody Walks” was name used in Arizona. Focus was also on staying healthy, which they hope will help with grant funding also. Cost $50 to $60 to do.
  • There is a foundation (Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, Vermont) that will send books. You can borrow them and send them back.  Info. and list of books: http://www.kellogghubbard.org/storywalk
  • Suggestion: if possible make the last stop inside the library. Families needed to enter the library to read the last page. They printed a map for folks to follow.
  • Information from the Kansas Library Association: http://kslibassoc.org/2014Conf/handouts/storywalkproject.pdf

 

Topic:PRESCHOOL STORYTIME CHALLENGES! 

How do you handle large groups and disruptive children? How about families that come late and interrupt the program? Parents who sit in the back of the room and talk to each other? Parents who text and do not pay attention (while you are trying to share early literacy tips)?

 

Discussion Points from Participants:

  • Be direct in your body language, facial expressions and tone.
  • Use nice tone to tell people to put phones away (just like they do at the theatre).
  • “Please turn phones off and put them away.  Take this time to be with your child without interruptions.”
  • Make sure mother/caregiver is sitting within the group (not in back of room) to help keep control.
  • Praise children – “You are doing an amazing job of listening, but some Moms (adults) are talking.”
  • Some parents expect you to do something and keep control.
  • Talk to parents directly at the end of the program
  • Have a bouncer at door (staff member) and close door when program starts. Bouncer does not let latecomers in. Bouncer also greets others when they arrive.
  • One parent wrote to mayor and mayor wrote back to be on time.
  • Once door is closed, folks can’t go in. Schools start on time. Children need to get use to that.
  • Child has meltdown --- “Feel free to go out and come back in.”
  • “Put away anything that is distracting.”
  • “Parents --- the more you are engaged in the program, the more kids will want to be engaged.”
  • Tell kids “Can you help your parent do that?” or “Let’s teach the big people this song since they don’t seem to know it!”  Use songs such as: “Row, row, row, your boat” and “Wheels of Bus,” have the adult be bus or boat and have child sit in the adult’s lap.
  • If you can lock door so you can get out, and they cannot get in, have sign on door “Storytime Has Started. I am sorry you have missed it. Please come again next time.” Sign is in English and Spanish.
  • One library has guidelines. “If we do all of these things, we will have a great time.” 1. Participate and sing songs, do rhymes (parent/caregiver) 2. No cell phones on 3. No food or drink 4. Meltdown statement.
  • One librarian will just stop, even if in middle of the story and is totally silent until everyone is quiet.
  • Keep consistency. Start on time, start with same opener.
  • One library reverses and does playtime first. Then most people have arrived, and then does storytime. Song “Everyone put their ball away,” or other clean-up song (ex – “Goodbye Shakers” to the tune of “Goodbye Ladies”). When finished, use goodbye song and shakers.
  • Others do bubbles last, and have a stamp.
  • Use songs that calm children down like “Twinkle Twinkle.” Another example is “Tall Tree” that can be found at the King County Library System’s “Tell Me a Story” site: https://kcls.org/content/tall-trees/
  • Three tips for a fun story time: 1. don’t expect the kids to sit absolutely still but do expect you (the adult) to keep them safe. If there’s a meltdown, step outside & regroup. 2. Distractions away till the end of the program when there will be time for that (snacks, visiting, etc.) 3. Big people take part – the more engaged you are, the more your child will be. 
  • Try to be aware of any children with special needs in your group.  Talk to the parents and see what they suggest to help their child enjoy the program.  You may want to investigate and gain more insights at websites such as Reading Rockets, Storytime Underground, WebJunction: The learning place for libraries that includes programs like -  Serving the Underserved: Children with Disabilities at Your Library. Search the web with phrases such as “Story time special needs,” ‘story times disabilities,’ or “story times ADHD.”

 

TOPIC for 2018 Midwinter: Books and STEAM Activities

 

 

FUTURE PLANS: 2018 ALA Midwinter:   Books and STEAM Activities

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ACRL EBSS Instruction for Educators Committee (Educational and Behavioral Sciences Section)

Online Doc EBSS Instruction for Educators Committee Annual Meeting Minutes 2017

by Samantha Godbey on Mon, Jul 24, 2017 at 02:28 pm

ACRL/EBSS Committee Meeting Minutes (approved via email)

 

Date: Thursday, June 15, 2017

Committee name: Instruction for Educators Committee

Members present: Kim Frail, Amy Gilgan, Samantha Godbey (chair), Genevieve Innes, Daniel Zuberbier, Ernesto Hernandez (incoming committee member), Lesley Farmer (guest)

Time and place: 11:00-12:00 pm PST via Google Hangouts

 

ACRL/EBSS Committee Meeting Minutes (approved via email)

 

Date: Thursday, June 15, 2017

Committee name: Instruction for Educators Committee

Members present: Kim Frail, Amy Gilgan, Samantha Godbey (chair), Genevieve Innes, Daniel Zuberbier, Ernesto Hernandez (incoming committee member), Lesley Farmer (guest)

Time and place: 11:00-12:00 pm PST via Google Hangouts

 

Approval of notes from prior meeting: Minutes from the previous meeting were approved virtually over email.

 

1. Greetings
- Samantha shared that next year, the committee will need to work on revising the Information Literacy Standards for Teacher Education in light of the Framework

2. Committee member progress updates re: Lesson Plan Project

Google doc link: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1Nfj3NevpxI-u_LIuLXrv5TqAe-E-iLd1dQOPnadpZN0

 

- Amy shared that she would have felt more comfortable with a template for what to do

- Committee members had not agreed on an exact end product for the project, so a template wasn’t possible.

- Member contributions to the shared document are mixed. Some members revised a lesson plan, others commented on experience

 

3. Discussion of format/venue for sharing our work, next steps

-       Possible options for publication were shared:

-       Fall EBSS newsletter

-       C&RL News article or The Way I See It article

-       Dan suggested The Way I See It article on broader ideas from the experience, sharing experience with re-mixing lesson plans, connecting this to the way it’s done among K-12 educators.

-       Lesley shared that MERLOT is a potential option for sharing our lesson plans – option to create bookmark collections with a unique URL that can be shared; Lesley also noted different academic communities within MERLOT; features of MERLOT include both a controlled vocabulary and options for tags

-       Lesley suggested a think-aloud process article

-       Dan agreed to be point person for project either informally or as incoming co-chair

 

4. Decided on the following as next steps:

- Samantha will follow up with current committee to encourage any individuals who want to post a lesson plan or resource that came out of their individual work to do so by June 30

- Any current committee members who are rotating off the committee and are interested in potential involvement in an article/write-up should let Samantha or Dan know

- Dan and Diane Fulkerson, as next year’s co-chairs, will discuss the write-up/article with the new committee, and decide how to proceed

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Spectrum & Diversity Scholars Community

Discussion Assistant or Associate Research Data Specialist for the Research Data Service, UIUC (apply by Aug 25)

by Gwendolyn Prellwitz (staff) on Mon, Jul 24, 2017 at 09:50 am

Assistant or Associate Research Data Specialist for the Research Data Service
Academic Professional Position
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Position Available: Two positions open immediately. The expected start date is as soon as possible after the closing date. This is a 12 month, 100% time Academic Professional position.

Assistant or Associate Research Data Specialist for the Research Data Service
Academic Professional Position
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Position Available: Two positions open immediately. The expected start date is as soon as possible after the closing date. This is a 12 month, 100% time Academic Professional position.

Duties and Responsibilities: The Research Data Service seeks an innovative, collaborative, and service-oriented professional.  This position is with the Research Data Service headquartered at the University Library. The candidate will advance the Illinois’ Research Data Service program (http://researchdataservice.illinois.edu) by directly partnering with researchers and units to manage, curate, publish, and archive research data. Illinois research data requires attention, curation, and dedicated management to ensure that the research done at Illinois is efficient, reliable, and can stand the test of time. The Illinois Research Data Service is a young, dynamic program that has quickly become well-respected for our team’s commitment and ability to provide researchers across a variety of disciplines with practical but progressive guidance, training, and tools for managing and archiving data. We currently have an opening for a Research Data Specialist to join our team and strongly encourage those with backgrounds in research data curation, coordination and/or management of research studies or programs, information technology, and advanced research degrees to apply. 

Specific areas of activity include but are not limited to:

  • Advise and assist researchers in adoption and adaptation of best practices for the management of research data;
  • Assist researchers in preparation and deposition of datasets into institutional or discipline-specific repositories;
  • Utilize current research experience and work to become familiar with a variety of other disciplines and types of data to curate datasets for deposit into the Illinois Data Bank (databank.illinois.edu);
  • Advise and assist in development of workflows for the creation of documentation and provenance information for datasets;
  • Provide expert analysis of technical requirements; identify and recommend potential software and tools for data re-use, management, and curation;
  • Seek out and lead a variety of data management training scenarios, including sessions for departments, research groups, and through one-on-one consultations;
  • Monitor agency and publisher data policies, and advise on and review Data Management Plans submitted as part of funding proposals;
  • Participate in outreach and promotion of the Research Data Service and associated Library programs

Current Research Data Service activities have benefited from development and input from a diverse group of invested colleagues from across the library and campus. The candidate is encouraged to both maintain and improve current activities, but also identify new opportunities and strategies to augment, extend, or otherwise improve Illinois’ data management services. The position requires the ability to identify and prioritize the needs of campus researchers, and to be able to work both independently and as part of a team. Research Data Specialists play an important role by interfacing with campus researchers, librarians, IT professionals, and other professional staff. This includes participating and contributing to the planning and development of other data services and policies, both campus-wide and through collaborations with other universities.

Environment: Headquartered in the University Library, the Research Data Service is a partnership between the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research, the Library, iSchool, Tech Services, and NCSA.  The service provides the Illinois research community with the expertise, tools, and infrastructure necessary to manage and steward research data.

Qualifications:

Required: Bachelor’s degree and experience working in an academic research environment OR an advanced degree in an informatics-oriented or research-oriented discipline; demonstrated ability to execute sound data management practices including organization, documentation, and preservation of research data; ability to think creatively to develop innovative data management outreach and training materials; ability to work in a team environment; skills for effective oral and written communication with co-workers, researchers, and others from a variety of disciplines and backgrounds; demonstrated ability to manage multiple projects at once, to set priorities, and meet deadlines

Preferred: Advanced degree in an informatics- or research-orientated discipline; two or more years of professional experience managing research data including compliance with funding agency requirements; Familiarity with database or repository structure and development; familiarity with formal metadata schema; facilitation experience; Demonstrated ability to identify and vet resources and tools for data sharing, analysis, and archiving; knowledge of academic publishing; certification as a Software Carpentry instructor, or willingness to become certified.

Salary: Salary and rank are commensurate with credentials and experience.

Terms of Appointment: Twelve-month appointment; 24 annual vacation days; 11 annual paid holidays; 12 annual sick-leave days (cumulative), plus an additional 13 sick-leave days (non-cumulative) available, if needed, each year; health insurance requiring a small co-payment is provided to employee (with the option to purchase coverage for spouse and dependents); required participation in State Universities Retirement System (SURS) (8% of annual salary is withheld and is refundable upon termination), with several options for participation in additional retirement plans; newly-hired employees are covered by the Medicare portion of Social Security and are subject to its deduction.

Campus & Community: The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is a comprehensive and major public land-grant university (Doctoral/Research University-Extensive) that is ranked among the best in the world. Chartered in 1867, it provides undergraduate and graduate education in more than 150 fields of study, conducts theoretical and applied research, and provides public service to the state and the nation. It employs 3,000 faculty members who serve 31,000 undergraduates and 12,000 graduate and professional students; approximately 25% of faculty receives campus-wide recognition each year for excellence in teaching. More information about the campus is available at www.illinois.edu. The University is located in the twin cities of Champaign and Urbana, which have a combined population of 100,000 and are situated about 140 miles south of Chicago, 120 miles west of Indianapolis, and 170 northeast of St. Louis. The University and its surrounding communities offer a cultural and recreational environment ideally suited to the work of a major research institution. For more information about the community, visit:http://illinois.edu/about/community/community.html orhttp://www.ccchamber.org/.

Apply: To ensure full consideration, please complete your candidate profile at https://jobs.illinois.edu and upload a letter of interest, resume, and contact information including email addresses for three professional references. Applications not submitted through this website will not be considered. For questions, please call: 217-333-8169.

DEADLINE: in order to ensure full consideration, applications must be received by August 25, 2017.

The University of Illinois conducts criminal background checks on all job candidates upon acceptance of a contingent offer.

The University of Illinois is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action employer. Minorities, women, veterans and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply. For more information, visit http://go.illinois.edu/EEO. To learn more about the University’s commitment to diversity, please visit http://www.inclusiveillinois.illinois.edu.

 

 

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IFRT (Intellectual Freedom Round Table)

Discussion IFRT Committee Updates

by Kristin Pekoll-IL (staff) on Wed, Jul 19, 2017 at 02:11 pm

The following comments will be committee updates from each of the chairs

The following comments will be committee updates from each of the chairs

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