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Online Doc Dec. 1 deadline for ALCTS 2015 Publication Awards nominations

by Keri Cascio-IL (staff) on Fri, Feb 27, 2015 at 08:08 pm
in ALCTS

Nominations are being accepted for the 2015 Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS) awards for excellence in publication. ALCTS presents two Publication Awards to honor individuals for outstanding achievement in research and writing in the field of library collections and technical services.  
            If you are interested in nominating a publication for either of the awards, contact the chair of that award jury. The deadline for nominations and supporting materials is Dec. 1.

Nominations are being accepted for the 2015 Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS) awards for excellence in publication. ALCTS presents two Publication Awards to honor individuals for outstanding achievement in research and writing in the field of library collections and technical services.  
            If you are interested in nominating a publication for either of the awards, contact the chair of that award jury. The deadline for nominations and supporting materials is Dec. 1.

  • Edward Swanson Memorial Best of LRTS Award:

            The award is given in honor of Edward Swanson, LRTS Book Review Editor and long time indexer, to the author(s) of the best paper published in Library Resources & Technical Services (LRTS), the official journal of ALCTS.  The winner will receive a citation and $250 from ALCTS.  Papers published in volume 58 (2014) are eligible for consideration, with the exception of official reports and documents, obituaries, letters to the editor and biographies of award winners.  Each paper will be judged on the following points: content with a significant contribution about one or more issues addressed by ALCTS and its sections; statements in the paper are adequately supported by accurate data and/or documentation; and clear and readable writing style.

Send nominations, along with the author, title and volume and issue of the paper being nominated and the reasons for the nomination to:  Art Miller, chair, Best of LRTS Jury, afmiller@princeton.edu

                        Visit the Edward Swanson Best of LRTS Award page for more information:

            

  • ALCTS Outstanding Publication Award:

            The award honors an author or authors who have written the year’s outstanding monograph, article or original paper in the field of technical services, including acquisitions, cataloging, collection management, preservation, continuing resources and related areas in the library field.  The award consists of a citation and $250 contributed by ALCTS.  Works published in 2014 are eligible.  Reprints of earlier publications will not be considered.  The evaluation criteria include:  intellectual content; practical value; theoretical value; scholarship; presentation; and style.  Papers published in Library Resources & Technical Services (LRTS) are not eligible.

Send nominations, along with a statement giving the full bibliographic citation of the article, book or paper being nominated and reasons for the nomination to:  Rene Erlandson, chair, Publication Jury, rerlandson@unomaha.edu

                        Visit the Outstanding Publication Award page for more information:

           

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Online Doc Latest Latest draftof Orientation for Congress document

by Jill Vassilakos-Long on Fri, Feb 27, 2015 at 05:46 pm
in GODORT Federal Documents Task Force (Government Documents Round Table)

2015_02_27 DRAFT of Orientation Document for Congress

One of the responsibilities of Members of the United States Congress is to keep the citizenry informed of the actions of the federal government. This is necessary for

2015_02_27 DRAFT of Orientation Document for Congress

One of the responsibilities of Members of the United States Congress is to keep the citizenry informed of the actions of the federal government. This is necessary for

  • voters to understand and support needed policies
  • researchers  to build on federally funded research (without excellent access to past results they would waste resources "re-inventing the wheel")
  • policy  makers to craft policies that move us forward: avoiding pitfalls and  incorporating successes from policies implemented in the past
  • historians and commentators to understand the impetus for past policy decisions
  • students to be inspired to become the next generation of our leaders
  • entrepreneurs to evaluate business locations and product demand

 

Congress established the Federal  Depository Library Program (FDLP)  as one way to meet their obligation to keep  the public informed.  It  gave the Government Publishing Office (GPO) the  responsibility of running the  program and the Joint  Committee on Printing oversight. Members of Congress can designate 2  libraries in their district as depository libraries.  Senators can designate 2 libraries in their state.  To find out if there is a current opening for a new designation,  contact the Superintendent of Documents. Libraries that commit to  housing these government publications appoint at least one librarian to learn the intricacies of government resources to assist the public in finding the information they seek. This partnership between Congress, libraries and the GPO results in one-on-one professional research assistance for local constituents. 

 

Every aspect of this service, from collecting the information to disseminating it; from providing access to publications to preserving them for future access, has become more complex as information is increasingly made available through the internet. 

 

Federal agencies put publications up on  their websites, then take them down, without considering future access.  The Chesapeake Digital Preservation Group  survey  found 51 % rate of  "link rot" for  dot-gov URLs over 6-year  period. If those publications  were sent to GPO, professionals would have created standardized metadata so  that they could be more easily discovered by the public and would have preserved an electronic copy so that the publication could be used well  into the future. When publications are sent to GPO to be printed, GPO rides the  print order to create copies to send to selected depositories. Those  libraries then take on the task of keeping the publications available to  the public in print or in microform. 

 

Naive people believe that everything can be found through Google. The truth is that Google does not create content, it simply points to information created by others. If they are not put up on internet servers for public access and maintained on internet servers for public access, then they are lost. Google cannot find what isn't there. 

 

Some policymakers believe that public agencies' statistical programs are competing with private publishers, when the truth is that private publishers who offer statistical publications or databases do so by utilizing data that has been gathered by public agencies. They may repackage it in useful ways, but they could never afford to gather it. Federal agency publications are not their competition, they are part of private publishers' supply chain. The statistics gathered by federal agencies are used by researchers and business people across the country. Citizens all want what is best for America. Accurate data is the foundation of making meaningful improvements. 

 

The information world has become more complex: 

 “The  simple fact is that no one knows    how much born-digital US Federal  government information has been created  or where it all is.” -- Jim  Jacobs, CRL Leviathan Conference. 

Leveraging the benefit of federal information resources through this partnership with information professionals at libraries in every congressional district throughout the country is simply brilliant. Members of Congress can help their  constituents get help by linking the  depository libraries on their  district web sites and the GPO directory  of depository libraries on  their web site. Find FDLP libraries your district here: http://catalog.gpo.gov/fdlpdir/FDLPdir.jsp

 

Bill Olbrich, government information specialist at the St. Louis Public Library was able to help concerned citizens with accurate information from both his state and federal government. He told us:

"The police shooting of un-armed Michael Brown in Ferguson, MO, on August 9, 2014, brought information requests explaining the actions of government agencies. While many questions asked about Missouri state legal practices, others queried the role of federal agencies. The United States Government Manual served as the starting point for understanding the Justice Department and the Civil Rights Commission. Their websites expanded that knowledge. The Commission’s website first announced it was streaming the Missouri State Advisory Committee meetings live. Justice Department statistics from Crime in the United States, 2013 and Law Enforcement Officers Killed and Assaulted, 2013 provided a realization beyond the numbers they gave. Finally, the Census Bureau’s incarceration statistics (1 Black male out of 3 will sit in a cell sometime in their life) drove home the incredible obstacles faced by American young Black males today." 

 

 

David Smith, a librarian at St. Clair County Library in Port Huron, Michigan who helped voters prior to a recent election reported:

 

"During   the last millage election for the library system, I would have several   people come in looking for population data for St. Clair County.  The   Census Bureau web site provided everything they could have asked for and  more.  Some patrons felt comfortable going on the site by themselves,   while others required some instruction to obtain the data they needed.    It was a good feeling being able to educate the voters before they  went  to the polls to cast their ballots.  Most people had never been to  the  web site before, and they were very impressed." 

 

Members  of Congress can assure that the depository libraries are able to serve  everyone by supporting funding for the "Public Information Programs of  the Superintendent of Documents" in the Government Publishing Office's  appropriations request.

 

 

 

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Discussion Latest Draft of Flyer to Legislators Concerning FDLP

by Timothy Dodge on Fri, Feb 27, 2015 at 12:00 pm
in GODORT Federal Documents Task Force (Government Documents Round Table)

Dear Colleagues,      Jill Vassilakos-Long has provided the latest draft of the flyer for legislators concerning the FDLP.   You may recall this was discussed at the FDTF meeting held in Chicago on Sunday, February 1 and also at the GODORT Membership and Steering Committee meetings.  Please see latest draft cut-andpasted below:      One of the responsibilities of Members of the United States Congress is to keep the

Dear Colleagues,      Jill Vassilakos-Long has provided the latest draft of the flyer for legislators concerning the FDLP.   You may recall this was discussed at the FDTF meeting held in Chicago on Sunday, February 1 and also at the GODORT Membership and Steering Committee meetings.  Please see latest draft cut-andpasted below:      One of the responsibilities of Members of the United States Congress is to keep the citizenry informed of the actions of the federal government. This is necessary for

  • voters to understand and support needed policies
  • researchers  to build on federally funded research (without excellent access to past results they would waste resources "re-inventing the wheel")
  • policy  makers to craft policies that move us forward: avoiding pitfalls and  incorporating successes from policies implemented in the past
  • historians and commentators to understand the impetus for past policy decisions
  • students to be inspired to become the next generation of our leaders
  • entrepreneurs to evaluate business locations and product demand

  Congress established the Federal  Depository Library Program (FDLP)  as one way to meet their obligation to keep  the public informed.  It  gave the Government Publishing Office (GPO) the  responsibility of running the  program and the Joint  Committee on Printing oversight. Members of Congress can designate libraries in their district as depository libraries.  Senators can designate 2 libraries in their state.  To find out if there is a current opening for a new designation,  contact the Superintendent of Documents. Libraries that commit to  housing these government publications appoint at least one librarian to learn the intricacies of government resources to assist the public in finding the information they seek. This partnership between Congress, libraries and the GPO results in one-on-one professional research assistance for local constituents.    Every aspect of this service, from collecting the information to disseminating it; from providing access to publications to preserving them for future access, has become more complex as information is increasingly made available through the internet.    Federal agencies put publications up on  their websites, then take them down, without considering future access.  The Chesapeake Digital Preservation Group  survey  found 51 % rate of  "link rot" for  dot-gov URLs over 6-year  period. If those publications  were sent to GPO, professionals would have created standardized metadata so  that they could be more easily discovered by the public and would have preserved an electronic copy so that the publication could be used well  into the future. When publications are sent to GPO to be printed, GPO rides the  print order to create copies to send to selected depositories. Those  libraries then take on the task of keeping the publications available to  the public in print or in microform.    Naive people believe that everything can be found through Google. The truth is that Google does not create content, it simply points to information created by others. If they are not put up on internet servers for public access and maintained on internet servers for public access, then they are lost. Google cannot find what isn't there.    Some policymakers believe that public agencies' statistical programs are competing with private publishers, when the truth is that private publishers who offer statistical publications or databases do so by utilizing data that has been gathered by public agencies. They may repackage it in useful ways, but they could never afford to gather it. Federal agency publications are not their competition, they are part of private publishers' supply chain. The statistics gathered by federal agencies are used by researchers and business people across the country. Citizens all want what is best for America. Accurate data is the foundation of making meaningful improvements.    The information world has become more complex: 

  •  “The  simple fact is that no one knows    how much born-digital US Federal  government information has been created  or where it all is.” -- Jim  Jacobs, CRL Leviathan Conference. 

Leveraging the benefit of federal information resources through this partnership with information professionals at libraries in every congressional district throughout the country is simply brilliant. Members of Congress can help their  constituents get help by linking the  depository libraries on their  district web sites and the GPO directory  of depository libraries on  their web site. Find FDLP libraries your district here: http://catalog.gpo.gov/fdlpdir/FDLPdir.jsp   Bill Olbrich, government information specialist at the St. Louis Public Library was able to help concerned citizens with accurate information from both his state and federal government. He told us:           "The police shooting of un-armed Michael Brown in Ferguson, MO, on August 9, 2014, brought information requests explaining the actions of government agencies. While many questions asked about Missouri state legal practices, others queried the role of federal agencies. The United States Government Manual served as the starting point for understanding the Justice Department and the Civil Rights Commission. Their websites expanded that knowledge. The Commission’s website first announced it was streaming the Missouri State Advisory Committee meetings live. Justice Department statistics from Crime in the United States, 2013 and Law Enforcement Officers Killed and Assaulted, 2013 provided a realization beyond the numbers they gave (no statistics on shootings by police). Finally, the Census Bureau’s incarceration statistics (1 Black male with 3 will sit in a cell sometime in their life) drove home the incredible obstacles faced by American young Black males today."      David Smith, a librarian at St. Clair County Library in Port Huron, Michiganwho helped voters prior to a recent election reported:  

  • "During   the last millage election for the library system, I would have several   people come in looking for population data for St. Clair County.  The   Census Bureau web site provided everything they could have asked for and  more.  Some patrons felt comfortable going on the site by themselves,   while others required some instruction to obtain the data they needed.    It was a good feeling being able to educate the voters before they  went  to the polls to cast their ballots.  Most people had never been to  the  web site before, and they were very impressed." 

  Members  of Congress can assure that the depository libraries are able to serve  everyone by supporting funding for the "Public Information Programs of  the Superintendent of Documents" in the Government Publishing Office's  appropriations request.

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Discussion LLAMA MAES Hot Topics in Assessment Discussion Group - Summary of Midwinter 2015 discussion

by Tobeylynn Birch on Fri, Feb 27, 2015 at 05:28 pm
in LLAMA MAES (Measurement Assessment and Evaluation Section)

At ALA Midwinter 2015 in Chicago, about 30 brave souls ignored blizzard warnings on Sunday afternoon and stayed at McCormick Place to participate in the MAES Hot Topics in Assessment discussion on "Using Ethnographic Research in Library Assessment." To initiate discussion, we heard about four completed or in-process studies from:

At ALA Midwinter 2015 in Chicago, about 30 brave souls ignored blizzard warnings on Sunday afternoon and stayed at McCormick Place to participate in the MAES Hot Topics in Assessment discussion on "Using Ethnographic Research in Library Assessment." To initiate discussion, we heard about four completed or in-process studies from:

  • Terry Taylor, DePaul University
  • Kirsten Kinsley, Florida State University
  • Terri Fishel, Macalester College
  • Neely J. Tang, Cornell University

Attached is a summary of the presentations, a handout from one of the speakers, and a handout about a multi-institution life mapping project.

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Online Doc AC 2015 Preliminary Schedule

by Susan Hornung-IL (staff) on Fri, Feb 27, 2015 at 02:19 pm
in ASCLA (Association of Specialized and Cooperative Library Agencies)

Attached please find the preliminary schedule for Annual Conference programs, meetings, and event for San Francisco, 2015. As soon as the rooms are assigned, we will post it here.

Best,

Susan Hornung

shornung@ala.org

Online Doc AC 2015 Preliminary Schedule

by Susan Hornung-IL (staff) on Fri, Feb 27, 2015 at 02:17 pm
in RUSA (Reference and User Services Association)

Attached please find the preliminary schedule for Annual Conference programs, meetings, and event for San Francisco, 2015. As soon as the rooms are assigned, we will post it here.

Best,

Susan Hornung

shornung@ala.org

Discussion Call for volunteers -- Virtual Meetings and GODORT Re-organization

by Samantha Hager on Fri, Feb 27, 2015 at 01:06 pm
in State and Local Documents Task Force

Hello State and Local Documents folks,

The Government Documents Round Table is forming two ad hoc committees  -- one to investigate the impacts and challenges associated with virtual meetings, and the other to evaluate whether the current structure of GODORT is effective in accomplishing the mission and goals of the organization.

Each committee will include a representative/member from the State and Local Documents Task Force.
So....I need two volunteers.

Hello State and Local Documents folks,

The Government Documents Round Table is forming two ad hoc committees  -- one to investigate the impacts and challenges associated with virtual meetings, and the other to evaluate whether the current structure of GODORT is effective in accomplishing the mission and goals of the organization.

Each committee will include a representative/member from the State and Local Documents Task Force.
So....I need two volunteers.

Criteria for membership in the Ad Hoc Committee on GODORT Virtual Meetings:
experience with organizing virtual meetings; and
expertise in the technologies that might be used.

Criteria for membership in the Ad Hoc Committee on GODORT Reorganization:
Any GODORT member

These committees will begin work ASAP. The committee charges are attached.

Please contact me if you are interested (hager_s@cde.state.co.us).

Samantha Hager
Coordinator, State and Local Documents Task Force

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Event Announcement of virtual meeting of the ACRL Standards Committee

by Susanna Boylston on Fri, Feb 27, 2015 at 12:47 pm
in ACRL Standards Committee (Association of College and Research Libraries)

The ACRL Standards Committee will hold a virtual meeting on Thursday, Thursday, March 12th at 11:30 am (EST).

I will have details soon on how to connect to the virtual meeting.

Agenda:

The ACRL Standards Committee will hold a virtual meeting on Thursday, Thursday, March 12th at 11:30 am (EST).

I will have details soon on how to connect to the virtual meeting.

Agenda:

  1. Welcome and introductions
  2. Appointment of a recorder
  3. Formal approval of minutes of January 15, 2015
  4. Liaison Update reports
  5. Discussion of standards due and coming due for revision; assignment of liaisons
  6. Announcements

Thanks very much,

Susanna

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