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Online Doc Free Access to Libraries for Minors

by Nanette Perez (staff) on Tue, Apr 22, 2014 at 11:23 am
in ALA Intellectual Freedom Committee

Proposed new title: Access to Library Resources and Services for Minors

Online Doc Naomi Chow -- Aloha!

by Naomi Chow on Mon, Apr 21, 2014 at 01:35 am
in IAmRUSA

Aloha from the 50th State!

Aloha from the 50th State!

I am Naomi Ikeda Chow, and I am the interlibrary loan librarian for Hamilton Library at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa in Honolulu. The Hawaiian islands provide the challenge of being one of the most geographically isolated locations in the world in terms of furthest from neighboring major land masses. The library provides interlibrary loan and document delivery for the students, faculty, and staff at our land-, sea-, and space-grant research university. Our patrons’ requests require us to seek lenders across the continental U.S. as well as internationally. We also have the privilege of providing access to materials in our collections to libraries and researchers around the world. Being able to successfully connect people with the information they need is very rewarding. And, I have found that the people involved in resource sharing/document delivery around the world, whether in individual libraries or within library consortia, are wonderful and supportive.

I have been a librarian in resource sharing/document delivery (RSDD) since 2009, and have loved every minute of it! My work in RSDD delves into a wide-range of areas including public services, collections, as well as technology. Since library work is multi-faceted, I have found that my experiences, whether gained from the commercial service industry, various types of libraries, or life experience as a parent, provide great skills and knowledge that I draw upon every day in my current position. My previous work background includes positions in academic medical reference services and collection development, and specialized biomedical research support in a small government library. I have also worked in retail as a department store salesperson in my youth, and more recently as a data assistant entering research data into an online database. My background includes an undergraduate degree in combined sociology/anthropology, and a graduate degree in library and information science. My library career has been two-part – early professional work with a break to raise a family – then a return to libraries.

I love to problem solve, whether with “scrambled” citations or tracking down hard-to-find items, as well as figure out how to improve workflow that benefits staff as well as library patrons. My work in an academic research library gives me the opportunity to work with staff from many different library departments. I enjoy being able to draw upon the expertise of colleagues from various subject specialties as well as technical intelligence and strengths, and in turn am able to contribute to the greater organization. Although a medium to larger-sized library may take a little longer to effect change, the overall environment is stimulating and there is possibility to contribute to projects that may have potential to have an impact beyond our one library. For example, I have been able to involve the library in the Occam’s Reader e-book ILL project, an inter-institutional effort through the Greater Western Library Allliance consortia.

The library and information field is ever-evolving and provides ample opportunities to grow and change with it. I feel very fortunate that the field is open to non-traditional career paths, including those who may take time away, such as I did. ALA and RUSA, including the STARS section, have provided invaluable resources for me to become reintroduced to the profession after my nearly decade-long break in service, through online courses, webinars, in-person workshops and courses, as well as the Annual and MidWinter conferences. Librarianship is a great profession where we’re able to provide great service to our patrons while doing something we enjoy including satisfying our own curiosity and love of learning.

Mahalo (thanks) for reading, and I look forward to your questions and comments!

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Online Doc 2014 ALA Annual Conference CLS Schedule and Location

by Sally Gibson on Tue, Apr 22, 2014 at 04:56 pm
in ACRL CLS Executive Committee (College Libraries Section)

Here is the schedule and locations for the CLS Meetings, Program, and Discussion Groups

 

Executive Committee Meeting (ACRL CLS)

Sat June 28

08:30 am 10:00 am

 BALLY-Director's Room

 

CLS Program

Science + Form = Function: The Impact of

Neuroscience on Architecture & Design

Sat June 28

01:00 pm 02:30 pm

LVCC-S220

 

Medium-Sized Academic Libraries Discussion

Group (ACRL CLS)

Sun June 29

08:30 am 10:00 am

BALLY-Las Vegas 5

 

Here is the schedule and locations for the CLS Meetings, Program, and Discussion Groups

 

Executive Committee Meeting (ACRL CLS)

Sat June 28

08:30 am 10:00 am

 BALLY-Director's Room

 

CLS Program

Science + Form = Function: The Impact of

Neuroscience on Architecture & Design

Sat June 28

01:00 pm 02:30 pm

LVCC-S220

 

Medium-Sized Academic Libraries Discussion

Group (ACRL CLS)

Sun June 29

08:30 am 10:00 am

BALLY-Las Vegas 5

 

CLIPP Committee Meeting (part of Publications

Coordinating Committee Meeting) (ACRL)

Sun June 29

08:30 am 10:00 am

 BALLY-Skyview 4

 

Leadership and Management Issues in College

Libraries Discussion Group (ACRL CLS)

Sun June 29

01:00 pm 02:30 pm

 BALLY-Las Vegas 5

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Online Doc Notes from April 21, 2014 COMM conference call

by Peter Hepburn on Tue, Apr 22, 2014 at 02:19 pm
in ALA Committee on Membership Meetings

Committee on Membership Meetings

Notes:  conference call

April 21, 2014

 

Discussion centered on three topic areas:

 

Publicity

Committee on Membership Meetings

Notes:  conference call

April 21, 2014

 

Discussion centered on three topic areas:

 

Publicity

  • Ron Jankowski outlined the steps taken to date and the steps to come in publicizing the virtual membership meeting.
  • The real push for promoting the meeting will start on April 28.
  • Jankowski directed participants in the call to the virtual membership meeting page.  Committee members should review the page and send feedback to Jankowski and Lois Ann Gregory Wood by end of day Friday.

 

Topics for the virtual membership meeting

  • Peter Hepburn updated the committee on conversation he had had with Barbara Stripling regarding two topics areas:  diversity and the presidential strategic initiative.
  • Participants reviewed the brainstormed topics shared in a February 19 e-mail shared around the committee.
    • MOOCs/Online education and doing more with less were the  only two topics with multiple mentions in the list of topics
    • The committee decided to present the virtual membership meeting participants with a half-dozen topics to vote on.  The strategic initiative will be broken into its components to provide three topics.  The final list is as follows:
      • Diversity (especially with reference to the joint statement on Orlando 2016)
      • Doing more with less
      • Information policy
      • Library advocacy
      • MOOCs/Online education
      • Professional development
      • Other (please suggest)

 

Other

  • Resolutions that do not get voted on by the end of the virtual membership meeting die.  Should the movers wish the resolution to return, it must be introduced as a new resolution at a future membership meeting.
  • Committee members will need to fill dead air in the virtual membership meeting.
  • Keep the conversation going by having responses or questions at hand, even if it’s as simple as saying, “I didn’t know about that – can anyone else tell me what they know about it?”
  • At the membership meeting at annual, committee members will be needed to take the head count throughout.
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Discussion Talking to people outside librarianship - eliminating jargon,"

by Diane Gurman on Mon, Apr 21, 2014 at 12:27 pm
in ALA Committee on Legislation (COL)

Hi COL.

I just read an article called "Straight talk: Doctoral Students Learn to Connect with Mainstream Audiences," which I thought could be useful in our advocacy efforts, especially as Leg Day approaches. 

Hi COL.

I just read an article called "Straight talk: Doctoral Students Learn to Connect with Mainstream Audiences," which I thought could be useful in our advocacy efforts, especially as Leg Day approaches. 

One of the points in the article is that overuse of jargon is alienating. As the Dean in charge of the new communication program notes, “We want to make graduate students bilingual.... They get plenty of training in the important skills of speaking and writing academically, but the more they learn that, the further they get from the way they should talk with somebody they’re sitting next to on an airplane or at a dinner party."

This problem is not limited to the hard sciences, but applies to the library world as well. For example, one of my main interests is copyright law as it applies to academic and public libraries, and I know that if I started talking to people who don't share my interest about the importance of first sale and fair use, I'd lose everyone immediately. 

The idea is to speak plainly about complex issues, and one way to do this is through storytelling -- a strategy we already use and should employ more often. “Storytelling,” explained Giordano [a professional presentation coach], “is the oldest form of expression,” breathing life into content and adding an emotional dimension. “We want more people to fall in love with our subject.”

Here is a link to the article: http://newsroom.ucla.edu/stories/straight-talk:-doctoral-students-learn-to-connect-with-mainstream-audiences

Talk to you all soon.  Best wishes,
Diane Gurman

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Discussion GODORT panel discussion at DLC: "Digitization and preservation of govt documents"

by James Jacobs on Tue, Apr 22, 2014 at 12:47 pm
in COL's FDLP Taskforce

Please join us for this GODORT panel discussion held during next week's Depository Library Council meeting in Washington DC. It's sure to be a lively discussion!

DIGITIZATION AND PRESERVATION OF GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS
GODORT Panel Discussion
Depository Library Council meeting in D.C. April 30, 2014 from noon until 1 pm
GPO, 710 North Capitol St. NW, Washington, D. C.

Moderator: GODORT Legislation Committee: Bernadine Abbott Hoduski, Chair

Panelists:

Please join us for this GODORT panel discussion held during next week's Depository Library Council meeting in Washington DC. It's sure to be a lively discussion!

DIGITIZATION AND PRESERVATION OF GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS
GODORT Panel Discussion
Depository Library Council meeting in D.C. April 30, 2014 from noon until 1 pm
GPO, 710 North Capitol St. NW, Washington, D. C.

Moderator: GODORT Legislation Committee: Bernadine Abbott Hoduski, Chair

Panelists:

  • Library of Congress: Mark Sweeney, Director for Preservation
  • National Library of Medicine: Walter Cybulski, Preservation Librarian
  • Stanford University Library: James R. Jacobs, Federal Government Information Librarian
  • University of North Texas Libraries: Suzanne Sears, Assistant Dean for Public Services and Chair of GODORT
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