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Equity for All to School Libraries

Discussion A Resolution on Equity

by Diane Chen (non-member) on Wed, Apr 27, 2016 at 10:47 pm

During a recent AASL executive committee meeting, the issue of equity for all students to essential and effective high quality school library programs throughout the country, not only in urban school districts like Chicago, but also in rural districts in every state, arose. As the AASL Division Councilor, I am asking for your help in crafting a resolution for ALA Council that will be purposeful and powerful. By using the ALA Connect Community, we can keep a record of our work plus be open and transparent to all who are interested in this issue. 

During a recent AASL executive committee meeting, the issue of equity for all students to essential and effective high quality school library programs throughout the country, not only in urban school districts like Chicago, but also in rural districts in every state, arose. As the AASL Division Councilor, I am asking for your help in crafting a resolution for ALA Council that will be purposeful and powerful. By using the ALA Connect Community, we can keep a record of our work plus be open and transparent to all who are interested in this issue. 

Let's discuss these and other issues:

1) The equity issue - what have we witnessed happening? Include links to articles, testimonials, etc. Especially things that may become part of our whereas section of the resolution. 

2) What we would like an ALA Resolution to accomplish? (The Resolves which tell others what we want to accomplish)

Here are some links that may help:

 

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ACRL Digital Curation Interest Group

Event POWRR Workshop - Scholarships available

by Suzanna Conrad on Tue, May 31, 2016 at 04:21 pm

Two POWRR Workshops will be held at Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas on Thursday, July 7 and Friday July 8, 2016.  To register for one of the workshop days, please use the following registration links:
 
Thurs. July 7 registration: http://digitalpowrr07072016.eventzilla.net
Friday July 8 registration: http://digitalpowrr07082016.eventzilla.net
 

Two POWRR Workshops will be held at Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas on Thursday, July 7 and Friday July 8, 2016.  To register for one of the workshop days, please use the following registration links:
 
Thurs. July 7 registration: http://digitalpowrr07072016.eventzilla.net
Friday July 8 registration: http://digitalpowrr07082016.eventzilla.net
 
The Texas Digital Library and the Digital Curation Interest Group are co-sponsoring this event. The Texas Digital Library has generously offered to cover lunch on both days of the workshop and Trinity University will be providing continental breakfast in the morning.  The POWRR Workshop will also be sponsoring travel scholarships for a few DCIG members, which will include up to $500 as a travel scholarship (distributed as a reimbursement). You can apply for a travel scholarship here.  Scholarship applications are due by Monday, May 16, 2016.
 
From Theory to Action:
A Pragmatic Approach to Digital Preservation Strategies and Tools
A Digital POWRR Workshop
 
The Digital POWRR (Preserving digital Objects With Restricted Resources) Workshop was created as a result of an IMLS-funded study on identifying digital preservation solutions for small-and mid-sized institutions looking to begin digital preservation practices. We continue to bring these workshops across the country thanks to funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities.
 
This full-day workshop is designed specifically for front-line practitioners who routinely complete collections processing work. If you understand the need for digital preservation, and are now seeking to build daily workflows that incorporate accessioning digital materials, processing them, and planning for their long-term preservation, this workshop is for you.
 
This is a hands-on workshop that deals with the "How" of digital preservation, rather than the "Why." Attendees will practice the accession of a digital collection using a simple, open-source tool; learn about several digital preservation tools and services; and create an institution-specific action plan for making progress towards digital preservation goals.
 
Please note that this is not a workshop on how to digitize materials. However, the curriculum could be helpful to implement a digital preservation plan into a digitization project. The skills taught can be applied to both born-digital as well as digitized collections.
 
This workshop is made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor.
 
Registration for DCIG members is now open, so use the links below to register:
 
Thurs. July 7 registration: http://digitalpowrr07072016.eventzilla.net
Friday July 8 registration: http://digitalpowrr07082016.eventzilla.net

 

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ALA E-Government Services Subcommittee

Discussion E-Government Services in Libraries: Free PreConference!

by Jennifer Manning on Tue, May 31, 2016 at 04:08 pm

E-Government Services Subcommittee of Committee on Legislation

American Library Association     Annual Conference 2016

E-Government Services Subcommittee of Committee on Legislation

American Library Association     Annual Conference 2016

Preconference:  E-Government Services: Ideas for Conquering an Unfunded Mandate

Thursday June 23, 1-4 pm

Location: Orange County Convention Center—West Building, Level I (OCCC), room W103A

9800 International Drive, Orlando, FL 32819.

 

As more government services go online-only, how can you help your patrons? Need inspiration? Join us for a FREE preconference afternoon of sessions for librarians about citizenship and immigration, consumer finance and emergency management. Learn about innovative partnerships between libraries and federal agencies, and libraries and county agencies. Hear about how your library could earn revenue through passport acceptance! Bring your questions for government representatives!

Annual Conference registration is not required! To reserve your free spot,  email Jennifer Manning, E-Government Services subcommittee, at manningj67@gmail.com

Schedule:

1:00        Welcome/Announcements

1:15        Consumer Financial Protection Bureau: story of  a library/federal agency partnership

                speakers: Carmen Cruz and Ken McDonnell, Financial Education Program Analysts, CFPB with   Paolo Melillo, Branch Manager, Southeast, Orange County Library System       

2:00        “Embedded at the Emergency Operations Center”

                --Chris Jankow, Palm Beach County Library System’s Community Engagement Coordinator, will               discuss the system’s partnership with PBC Emergency Management and how two librarians              joined the front lines of disaster response efforts.

                speakers: Chris Janklow, Palm Beach County Library System

2:30        State Department—Bureau of Consular Affairs—Passport Acceptance Program

                Did you know your library could earn revenue by issuing passports?

                speaker: Ryan Dooley, Director, Miami Passport Agency, U.S. Department of State

3:00        Citizenship & Immigration Services

                speaker: Kristina Carty-Pratt, Division Chief, Publications & Outreach, Office of Citizenship, USCIS

3:30        “Citizenship Inspired” (workshops to prepare patrons for the U.S. Naturalization Test &             Interview)

                speaker: Gregg Gronlund,  Branch Manager, West Oaks Branch Library & Genealogy Center,       Orange County  Library System

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RUSA Committee and Section Reports

Discussion Reference Service Press Award Annual Report 2016

by Elizabeth Kline on Tue, May 31, 2016 at 04:00 pm

Attached is the committee report. Thanks...Elizabeth Kline

Spectrum & Diversity Scholars Community

Discussion Call for Proposals - IK: Other Ways of Knowing

by Twanna Hodge on Tue, May 31, 2016 at 02:21 pm

IK: Other Ways of Knowing

Spring 2017; Vol. 3, No. 1

Guest Editor: Manuel Ostos, Romance Languages and Literatures Librarian, Pennsylvania State University

Deadline: December 15, 2016

IK: Other Ways of Knowing

Spring 2017; Vol. 3, No. 1

Guest Editor: Manuel Ostos, Romance Languages and Literatures Librarian, Pennsylvania State University

Deadline: December 15, 2016

This Special Issue on “Preserving Indigenous Knowledge in Latin America: Current Practices, Opportunities, and Challenges” will explore questions and issues inherent to indigenous knowledge creation, distribution, and preservation, with an emphasis in Latin America but not excluding other regions. This includes a wide range of topics, including research and methodologies applied in indigenous communities, storytelling, and preservation practices, as well as associated concerns such as ethics and policies. Recommended topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

• Preservation of indigenous knowledge

• Indigenous languages and literatures

• Policies for indigenous knowledge systems

• Local histories and storytelling

• Ethics in indigenous knowledge

• Indigenous methodologies and research

• Indigenous knowledge in libraries and archives

IK: Other Ways of Knowing is an online, open access journal published by the Penn State Interinstitutional Center for Indigenous Knowledge (ICIK). The journal is available, with instructions to authors, at http://journals.psu.edu/ik . The Spring/Summer issue each year is a themed issue (as above). The Fall/Winter issue is an open call for manuscripts. Manuscripts for the open issue will be accepted at any time. The journal will publish manuscripts in indigenous languages when accompanied by an English translation.

Learn more about ICIK at http://www.icik.psu.edu/

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Spectrum & Diversity Scholars Community

Discussion Call for Book Chapters: Gender Studies in the Library: Case Studies, Programming, Outreach

by Twanna Hodge on Tue, May 31, 2016 at 02:18 pm

Gender Studies in the Library: Case Studies, Programming, Outreach

Book Publisher: McFarland

Carol Smallwood, co-editor. Library's Role in Supporting Financial Literacy for Patrons (Rowman & Littlefield, 2016); public library administrator, special, school librarian.

Lura Sanborn, co-editor. Women, Work, and the Web, contributor, (Rowman & Littlefield, 2015); public, academic, school librarian.

Gender Studies in the Library: Case Studies, Programming, Outreach

Book Publisher: McFarland

Carol Smallwood, co-editor. Library's Role in Supporting Financial Literacy for Patrons (Rowman & Littlefield, 2016); public library administrator, special, school librarian.

Lura Sanborn, co-editor. Women, Work, and the Web, contributor, (Rowman & Littlefield, 2015); public, academic, school librarian.

One or two chapters sought from U.S. practicing academic, public, school, special librarians, LIS faculty, sharing practical know-how about what works for Women/ Men/LGBTIQ to meet patron gender information. Chapters sought useful to public, school, special librarians, LIS faculty: proven, creative,
case studies, how-to chapters based on experience to help colleagues with innovative workshops, outreach, grants, resources.

Topics could include but are not limited to: getting boys to use the library; showcasing GBLTIQ voices; programming, successful examples, intentions and outcomes; acquisitions, to support, showcase, represent; wage gaps; women's studies librarianship. No previously published, simultaneously submitted
material. One, two, or three authors per chapter; each chapter by the same author(s). Compensation: one complimentary copy per 3,000-4,000 word chapter accepted no matter how many co-authors or if one or two chapters: author discount on more.

Please e-mail titles of proposed chapters each described in a few sentences by June 30, 2016, brief bio on each author; place GEN, Your Name on subject line: smallwood@tm.net 

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Spectrum & Diversity Scholars Community

Discussion Call for Chapter Proposals- Re-Envisioning the MLS: Perspectives on the Future of Library and Information Science Education

by Twanna Hodge on Tue, May 31, 2016 at 02:18 pm

Re-Envisioning the MLS: Perspectives on the Future of Library and Information Science Education
 
Deadline is June 6, 2016: Submission of 750-1,000 word chapter proposal. 

Edited by Lindsay C. Sarin, Johnna Percell, Paul T. Jaeger, & John Carlo Bertot.

Re-Envisioning the MLS: Perspectives on the Future of Library and Information Science Education
 
Deadline is June 6, 2016: Submission of 750-1,000 word chapter proposal. 

Edited by Lindsay C. Sarin, Johnna Percell, Paul T. Jaeger, & John Carlo Bertot.

The last several years have been marked by a number of societal challenges and changes that include, but are not limited to, the evolving nature of our economy; the workforce skills needed to succeed in a shifting job market; advances in technology; the changing nature of information and the methods of accessing it; transformations in education and learning approaches; and rapid demographic shifts occurring in our communities. Libraries are not immune to these challenges, and there is much discussion regarding the future of libraries among library professionals, in the media, and by politicans. As we consider the future of libraries, we need to simultaneously focus on the future of librarians – and how our instructional programs in general and the Master of Library Science (MLS) degree (and its variants) programs – prepare them for their careers.

 Taking inspiration from the University of Maryland’s iSchool and the Information Policy & Access Center’s (iPAC)Re-Envisioning the MLS initiative, this book seeks chapters on topics that include, but are not limited to:

 The extent to which the MLS/MLIS degree is necessary or not necessary;

  • The changing nature of the communities that libraries serve and how LIS education has (or has not) addressed these changes;

  • Librarian values;

  • Qualities and qualifications necessary for effective LIS educators;

  • Qualities and qualifications necessary for future librarians/LIS students;

  • Aspects of the MLS/MLIS degree we need to maintain and/or those we need to let go;

  • Career paths for LIS grads (e.g. pathways outside of libraries);

  • The relevance of ALA accreditation and/or a discussion of the accreditation process; and

  • The impact of iSchools on MLS/MLIS education.

     

The book welcomes chapters that include case studies, empirical studies, and best practices from around the world. Please direct questions and submissions to: advancesLISeducation@gmail.com

 Important Dates:

  • June 6, 2016: Submission of 750-1,000 word chapter proposal

  • July 8, 2016: Notification of chapter acceptance to authors

  • October 1, 2016: Draft chapter due

  • November 1, 2016: Final chapters due

  • Summer 2017: Estimated publication date

This will be published by Emerald Insight as part of the Advances in Librarianship Series  http://www.emeraldinsight.com/series/ail 

About the Editors

 Lindsay C. Sarin is the Master of Library Science (MLS) Program Manager of the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland, Reviews Editor of The Library Quarterly, and Editor of The Political Librarian.

 Johnna Percell is the Communications Coordinator of the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland and Associate Editor of The Political Librarian.

 Paul T. Jaeger, Ph.D., J.D., is Professor, Diversity Officer, and Director of the Master of Library Science (MLS) program of the College of Information Studies and Co-Director of the Information Policy and Access Center at the University of Maryland.

 John Carlo Bertot, Ph.D., is Professor and co-director of the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) in the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland College Park. 

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Spectrum & Diversity Scholars Community

Discussion Call for Proposals: Reference Librarianship & Justice: History, Practice & Praxis

by Twanna Hodge on Tue, May 31, 2016 at 02:16 pm

Call for Proposals: Reference Librarianship & Justice: History, Practice & Praxis

Proposal Deadline is July 1, 2016. 

Editors: Kate Adler, Ian Beilin, and Eamon Tewell
Publisher: Library Juice Press

Call for Proposals: Reference Librarianship & Justice: History, Practice & Praxis

Proposal Deadline is July 1, 2016. 

Editors: Kate Adler, Ian Beilin, and Eamon Tewell
Publisher: Library Juice Press

Reference work often receives short shrift in the contemporary discourse and practice of librarianship. Conversations that concern critical pedagogy, social justice, and theory tend to revolve around instruction or cataloging practice. Moreover, reference librarians and reference services themselves seem to be disappearing. Reference Librarianship & Justice: History, Practice & Praxis seeks to stake out a space and make a passionate case for reference work in a manner that is historically, socially and politically compelling. It will highlight the unique position of reference librarianship, a liminal and dialectical space, potentially distinct from the power dynamics of classroom instruction and singular in its mission and practice. At heart, reference is a conversation and partnership. The stakes are significant, not only because of the unique potential for social justice work but because of the risk that the profession is now overlooking reference’s central importance.

Libraries can be viewed as “leaks in the informational economy” (Vaidhyanathan, 2004) and reference services inside and outside of the library have the capacity to create radical spaces of critique and social justice. Reference has a long history of contributing to libraries as sites of democratic access to information, ideas, books, and culture. That access is an essential element of an informed democracy and the intellectual engagement of the autonomous individual. Yet we overlook that this access doesn’t happen magically. Point-of-need interaction, key to the positioning of libraries as agents of social change, often pivots around the work of reference.

The Book’s Three Sections:

Part 1: Praxis
This chapter will mine diverse theoretical frameworks as they pertain to Social Justice & Reference. This may include the canonical theorists that Critical LIS Literature has traditionally engaged but an emphasis will be placed on work beyond the canon. In so doing, it will trouble and broaden traditional academic conventions. For example, the work of various activist traditions and social movement thinkers might be discussed, or epistemologies associated with non-western cultural ideas of property, ownership, knowledge, etc. Contributors are also encouraged to look to theorists writing in a variety disciplines: architecture, computer science, or law, among others. These frameworks can come from both inside and outside LIS literatures. For example: How has work in the area of radical cataloging or archival theory served to provide a lens through which to engage reference work?

Part 2: History
Part 2 makes the case that reference librarianship has a long tradition of social justice work. It will feature historical studies of reference work both in and out of libraries, international and domestic (e.g. librarians in totalitarian regimes, librarians during the cold war, etc.). In this section we encourage authors to make connections from the past to the present: what historical examples of reference service might serve as inspiration or as caution for present day efforts to provide a socially conscious reference service? Possible examples: reference work in Nazi Germany or Nazi-occupied Europe; reference services in segregated, Jim Crow libraries.

Part 3: Dispatches from the Field
Articles about mindful, social justice-oriented reference work in diverse settings (e.g. rural, Native American reservations; inner-city neighborhoods; situated within myriad institutions such as the federal government; and within myriad collections, e.g. archives, special collections, etc.) Part 3 seeks to bring parts one and two together. We laid the groundwork for the book’s claim about the centrality of social justice in reference work by presenting a variety of theoretical models; we’ve explored the rich genealogy of social justice in reference librarianship by looking to the past in part 2; and now, in our closing section, we seek to illuminate parts one and two and their relevance by looking to practice today.

Possible Chapter Topics:
– Reference as praxis: Explorations of diverse theoretical models and frameworks through which to think about Reference. We encourage proposals that engage thinkers, writers and traditions beyond the traditional Critical LIS canon, though new engagements of canonical thinkers are welcomed too.
– Studies exploring the historical tradition of reference librarianship as social justice practice. We encourage proposals that seek to connect and draw parallels between librarianship’s historical tradition and contemporary practice and the contemporary context.
– Examples of specific social justice initiatives tied to reference services.
– Linking reference services to social justice movements outside of the library.
– Innovations in reference service to better serve marginalized and oppressed groups.
– Reference work and anti-racism.
– Successful efforts at repurposing reference services with a social justice and/or critical focus.

Submission Guidelines:
Please submit the following to ReferenceAndJusticeBook@gmail.com by July 1, 2016:
– An abstract of up to 500 words describing your proposed chapter
– A brief biographical statement about the author(s)

Notifications will be sent by July 29, 2016. First drafts will be due December 1, 2016, with an anticipated final publication date of Fall 2017. Chapters are expected to be between 2000 and 5000 words.

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Sustainability Round Table (SustainRT)

Discussion Draft Minutes, SustainRT Conference Call, May 3, 2016

by Matthew Bollerman on Tue, May 31, 2016 at 12:25 pm

DRAFT

SustainRT Conference Call, May 3, 2016

 Present: Madeleine Charney, Coordinator; Matthew Bollerman, Secretary; Rebekkah Smith Aldrich, Member at Large; Rene Tanner, Coordinator-Elect; Ashley Jones, Past Coordinator; Eileen Harrington, Member at Large

Meeting was called to order at noon by Madeleine Charney.

Budget is the same with no updates at this time.

DRAFT

SustainRT Conference Call, May 3, 2016

 Present: Madeleine Charney, Coordinator; Matthew Bollerman, Secretary; Rebekkah Smith Aldrich, Member at Large; Rene Tanner, Coordinator-Elect; Ashley Jones, Past Coordinator; Eileen Harrington, Member at Large

Meeting was called to order at noon by Madeleine Charney.

Budget is the same with no updates at this time.

Governance Working Group – Ashley contacted Paul and his assistant Lindsay who asked if SustainRT could look into local sustainability options for Annual. Ashley will follow up with Paul. Peter Hepburn followed up with Keith Michael Fiels about further conversations to pursue resolution implementation.

Environmental Scan held a conference call which included editing the google form to include data to help feed the blog.

Outreach’s co-chair is Christina. Working on a travel stipend award via video essay submission. Twitter handle is changing.

Online Education – Libraries as Community Space Makers is happening on May 19 at 12:15 pm to 12:45.

Annual – The Lightning Rounds will be a panel discussion with a moderator. Member meeting will include discussion of budget, news, results of the election and upcoming activities and webinars. Broadcast of this meeting is tabled due to AV needs of making it a success. Social with SRRT on Saturday, June 25 at 5:30 pm. Some discussion about a booth with SRRT.

Virtual membership meeting a few weeks prior to Annual on ALA Connect is in the works. Time/day to come. Agenda similar to one for in-person meeting.

Task Force Updates: Diversity is wrapping up a two-year project. Future of Accredition for Library Curricula draft was reviewed with our comments.

Discussion on how to transition in new Board members. Project Teams will be called committees from this point forward.

Meeting adjourned at 1 pm.

Respectfully submitted, Matthew Bollerman, Secretary

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