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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Ignite sessions

Suggestion Taking Care of Business in the 21st Century: A New Service Model for Entrepreneurs

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:59 am

Taking Care of Business in the 21st Century: A New Service Model for Entrepreneurs
  
Speakers:

Caitlin Rietzen, Librarian II, Business Resource & Innovation Center at the Free Library of Philadelphia

Gillian Robbins

Caitlin Seifritz

Taking Care of Business in the 21st Century: A New Service Model for Entrepreneurs
  
Speakers:

Caitlin Rietzen, Librarian II, Business Resource & Innovation Center at the Free Library of Philadelphia

Gillian Robbins

Caitlin Seifritz

Description:
The Free Library of Philadelphia (FLP) recently launched the Business Resource and Innovation Center (BRIC), a new programming model which combined the resources of the nonprofit and small business assistance centers. After extensive research, BRIC staff realized there was a niche in the small business community which needed to be filled- librarianship. Whether clients were part of a larger small business development program, or did not have a university background, they often encountered problems that librarians could help them solve. Chiefly, these were finding quality, low-cost programs, evaluating which local resources would best fit their needs, and getting assistance with conducting research. The BRIC model is designed to reduce the barriers to local entrepreneurship by creating more accessible points of entry into organizational development. Staff librarians provide personal guidance to clients by engaging them in research appointments geared towards grant funding, proposal writing, demographic and market research, and competitive analysis. By maintaining strong partnerships and curating local resources, librarians guide and advise clients on area offerings to fit their organizational needs. Additionally, with resources that span the fields of for-profit and nonprofit, the BRIC is uniquely poised as a hub for social entrepreneurship in a region with great potential for local innovation. Learn how staff librarians were able to develop and launch the core of this model, as well as generate relevant data, on basically no budget.

Library Types:
Nonprofit, Public, Special

Subject Headings:
Adult Services, Advocacy, Community Engagement, Diversity, Electronic Resources, Equity of Access, Instruction, Librarianship, Networking, Organizational Change, Outreach Services, Partnerships, Project Management, Reference Services, Research and Statistics, Technology, Urban Libraries

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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Ignite sessions

Suggestion Staying Connected: The Roadmap to Social Media Success

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:59 am

Staying Connected: The Roadmap to Social Media Success
  
Speaker:

Kimberly Lace Lee. Fama, University of British Columbia

Staying Connected: The Roadmap to Social Media Success
  
Speaker:

Kimberly Lace Lee. Fama, University of British Columbia

Description:
As university students get more accustomed to receiving information from a wide variety of social media channels, catching their attention by simply posting or tweeting about an event is not enough. In today's fast-paced world, users are looking for more impactful and tailored messages. I will discuss the social media plan that increased our engagement thrice fold and our follower count in Facebook within a year of implementation. Highlights will include how our three social media strategies (social strategy, marketing strategy and content strategy) are implemented within our social media cycle. In addition, there will be a strong focus on the social media calendar that is integral to our content strategy. As applications and software have become more reliant on algorithms based on a person's profile and activity to determine what information to show the user, this innovative calendar gives a strategic view of our social media activity and serves as an enhanced reporting tool to our unit and various communication departments in the organization. The presentation will conclude with our findings from our metrics and how we have optimized our practices to keep up with the latest trends in order to set the direction for our social media strategy in 2017.

The social media calendar, plan and strategies are flexible and can be applied across various libraries and information organizations with modifications according to their communication needs.

Library Types:
Academic, Student, Undergraduate

Subject Headings:
Assessment and Evaluation, Community Engagement, Emerging Technologies, Learning Commons, Marketing, Outreach Services, Popular Culture, Social Media & Networks, Technology

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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Ignite sessions

Suggestion Social justice in libraries: social work roots and the progressive library mission

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:58 am

Social justice in libraries: social work roots and the progressive library mission
  
Speaker:

Monique Oldfield, MSW, MLIS, Librarian, Wayne State University

Social justice in libraries: social work roots and the progressive library mission
  
Speaker:

Monique Oldfield, MSW, MLIS, Librarian, Wayne State University

Description:
Chicago is the perfect place to remember the origins of social work and continue work towards additional social justice efforts. Our commitment to community engagement in the library profession has a connection to many historical social reform efforts. Reflecting on the settlement house movement see how the beginnings of the social work profession lead into the role of the library as a change agent in the community today. The connection between social work and libraries is not new and continues to evolve. How do libraries commit to social justice efforts and make the most of our mission.

The library is the cultural center of the community beyond the provision of book materials. This presentation explores the origins of social work and social justice with a discussion of the settlement house movement and the role of the library as a change agent in the community today. The presenter utilizes photographs depicting both past and present social work in libraries accomplishments.

Going forward where should our efforts be placed? Social work in libraries can focus on many types of activities. Pantries to assist with emergency food, clothes, and personal care items. Citizenship and job search classes. Building literacy in its many forms such as financial literacy, data literacy, as well as increased reading skills. The profession has much to be proud of as a contributor to progressivism and increasing the potential of individuals in all areas of life.

Library Types:
Academic, Joint Use, Public, Student

Subject Headings:
Advocacy, Buildings and Facilities, Continuing Education, Diversity, Equity of Access, Ethics, Facilitation, Librarianship, Literacy, Outreach Services, Partnerships, Public Services, Social Change, Transforming Libraries, Trends and Forecasting, Urban Libraries

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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Ignite sessions

Suggestion Slaying the Monster: Implementing Plagiarism Workshops

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:58 am

Slaying the Monster: Implementing Plagiarism Workshops

Speaker:

Claire A. Miller, MLIS, Librarian, South Florida State College

Slaying the Monster: Implementing Plagiarism Workshops

Speaker:

Claire A. Miller, MLIS, Librarian, South Florida State College

Description:
As a college library, educating students is an essential part of our mission. But a spate of plagiarism challenged our faculty, and the library sought a solution based in educating students. Working from the idea that most undergraduate plagiarism is based on ignorance rather than malice, the library implemented a series of stand-alone workshops to combat plagiarism. After a strong faculty and student response, we developed a series of one-shot ingratiated class instruction sessions focused on both plagiarism and citation. While data assessment is on-going, three terms of results comparing class wide turnitin.com originality scores between sections show that this workshop model reduces plagiarism significantly (up to 30 percent), especially in introductory courses.

Library Types:
Academic, Community College, High School, School/Media Center

Subject Headings:
Adult Services, Ethics, Information Literacy, Instruction, Learning Commons, Reference Services

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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Ignite sessions

Suggestion Rethinking Children's Nonfiction Literature in a Digital World - the Nonfiction Minute

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:58 am

Rethinking Children's Nonfiction Literature in a Digital World - the Nonfiction Minute

Speaker:

Karen M. Sterling, M. Ed. Library Science, Board member, iNK Think Tank; K-12 Library Coordinator, Pennridge School District, Pennridge School District/ North Middle School

Rethinking Children's Nonfiction Literature in a Digital World - the Nonfiction Minute

Speaker:

Karen M. Sterling, M. Ed. Library Science, Board member, iNK Think Tank; K-12 Library Coordinator, Pennridge School District, Pennridge School District/ North Middle School

Description:
What would happen if two-dozen top children's nonfiction authors wrote short (400-word) essays on topics that interested them to engage kids and introduce them to a different kind of author? What if we wrote one for every day of the school year? Suppose we forgot about reading levels but included an audio file of the author reading his/her work and added appropriate graphics, videos and music? And, what if a top editor (Jean Reynolds) was in charge of the project and we gave it away free at the website www.nonfictionminute.com?

This project was undertaken by iNK Think Tank, Inc, a nonprofit organization of award-winning children's nonfiction authors for the school year of 2014-2015. We produced 180 Minutes. That year we had 300,000 page views and 90,000 unique visitors. We revised the Minutes for the next school year and this year we have made the archives available but also given a schedule of the Minutes for the upcoming week. Here are some of the teacher's comments:

*Nonfiction Minute is a tool to create curiosity in our students. It sparks the imagination and the "I didn't know that!" first thing in the morning.
* I started class with the Nonfiction Minute. I was teaching a research class at the time and often times we would explore more of the topic presented. The kids loved it and looked forward to it. We commented more than once that "the truth was stranger than fiction." We even celebrated "waffle day" by making them in the library! I loved the way the email would come with the topics to be presented.
*These are so much fun to read and are so well written by a dazzling collection of terrific authors..
* What a great way to introduce kids to amazing authors. They have sent many of my students to the library.

These authors are professors-at-large for children. They know content and they speak "child."

Library Types:
Elementary School, High School, Middle School, School/Media Center, Student

Subject Headings:
Children’s Literature, Children’s Services, Digitial Libraries, Electronic Resources, Information Literacy, Literacy, Readers’ Advisory, Transforming Libraries, Young Adult Services, Youth Services

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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Ignite sessions

Suggestion Read to the Children: Connecting Families in Correctional Libraries

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:56 am

Read to the Children: Connecting Families in Correctional Libraries

Speaker:

Erin Boyington, Adult Services Senior Consultant, Institutional Library Development, CDE

Read to the Children: Connecting Families in Correctional Libraries

Speaker:

Erin Boyington, Adult Services Senior Consultant, Institutional Library Development, CDE

Description:
One in 28 children in the United States has an incarcerated parent. Fifty-nine percent of parents in a state correctional facility report never having a personal visit from their children. Children in this situation are put at risk and suffer separation and loss. In Colorado, 21 state correctional facility libraries are doing something about this. Find out about Read to the Children, a program to connect incarcerated parents to their children and foster early literacy skills!

Library Types:
Prison Library, State Library

Subject Headings:
Adult Services, Equity of Access, Literacy, Social Change

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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Ignite sessions

Suggestion Read a Book...Teach a Life Skill!

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:56 am

Read a Book...Teach a Life Skill!

Speaker:

Julia Cook, Author/Presenter, Boys Town Press

Read a Book...Teach a Life Skill!

Speaker:

Julia Cook, Author/Presenter, Boys Town Press

Description:
According to Forbes Magazine, the number one trait that employers are looking for when searching for an employee is the ability to work as a team player. Human communication and relationship building are crucial in developing effective team players. As our kids are becoming more and more technologically advanced, they are losing their social skills and abilities to communicate effectively. As educators, we are in the PEOPLE BUSINESS! We need to give our kids the tools they need to become great people! To do that, we must teach them social skills. In order to teach children, we must be able to enter their view of the world. Reading a fun, engaging story book to a child is a great way to do that! Julia Cook will introduce and describe several books that address social skill development in a first person, hands on way. Learn about books that tackle such issues as prejudice, digital footprint and citizenship, teasing vs bullying, taking responsibility, bad attitude, listening and following instructions, dealing with cliques, using your social filter, accepting NO for and answer...and the list goes on. Each book presents a problem, followed by effective solutions, weaved into an empathetic, entertaining story. These books not only models positive problem solving strategies, but also gives adults a template for "what to say" and "how to say it."

Library Types:
Academic, Elementary School, Library School, Middle School, Museum, Nonprofit, Prison Library, Public, School/Media Center, Student

Subject Headings:
Advocacy, Career Advice, Children’s Literature, Children’s Services, Community Engagement, Disaster Planning, Diversity, Ethics, Friends Groups, Games and Gaming, Information Literacy, Instruction, Literacy, Multicultural Services, Popular Culture, Social Change, Social Media Networks, Special Needs Populations, Support Staff, Technology, Training, Young Adult Services, Youth Services

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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Ignite sessions

Suggestion Reach Out and Touch Screens: Using Online Games to Train Library Users and Staff

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:55 am

Reach Out and Touch Screens: Using Online Games to Train Library Users and Staff

Speaker:
Naomi Binnie, MLIS, MSIT (2018), Librarian, New York Institute of Technology

Reach Out and Touch Screens: Using Online Games to Train Library Users and Staff

Speaker:
Naomi Binnie, MLIS, MSIT (2018), Librarian, New York Institute of Technology

Description:
Library literacy on the college campus varies. Some students have participated in face-to-face information literacy courses with librarians. However, at many schools, students fall through the cracks and never learn to use the library. At the New York Institute of Technology (NYIT), I found that many students lacked knowledge about their library and its resources. Based on observation and statistics, I found that many students did not utilize the full services that the library offers. In order to reach students, librarians need to meet students where they are -- online. Students are on smartphones, tablets and computers. What better way to reach students than through an interactive game that teaches students about the library’s resources?

I will discuss an online game that I have developed to train library users and staff at the New York Institute of Technology (NYIT) and offer observations on a recent test run of the game. I used Aris, an open-source gaming platform, to create a series of training modules about our library's resources. These modules make up a scavenger hunt activity that requires trainees to take a physical tour of the library. Trainees are provided with tablets, and in order to proceed through each module in the game, they need to locate and scan QR codes placed around the library's three floors. The game therefore maps instructional input onto a self-guided tour of the library and encourages students to interact with the library's physical and virtual spaces.

Library Types:
Academic, Student, Undergraduate

Subject Headings:
Assessment and Evaluation, Games and Gaming, Information Literacy, Instruction, Outreach Services

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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Ignite sessions

Suggestion Put your reference first: building a better reference model through iterative design.

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:55 am

Put your reference first: building a better reference model through iterative design.

Speaker:

Andrew See, Head of User Services, Northern Arizona University Cline Library

Put your reference first: building a better reference model through iterative design.

Speaker:

Andrew See, Head of User Services, Northern Arizona University Cline Library

Description:
Trying to find a balance between staffing levels and providing high quality reference support is a challenge many libraries face.  This has traditionally been accomplished using staff and students to answer directional and less complex questions, leaving more complex reference queries to be “referred up”.  This addresses the efficiency issue but does little to enhance the user experience.  As libraries continue to migrate to self-service models and host software with intuitive search interfaces, the need for a more nuanced front line reference staff has never been more important.
Until last Fall, this was the model at The Northern Arizona University Cline Library.  
Driven by staffing and training issues, a fast-paced information desk, and a philosophy of placing our reference first, we took an iterative approach to landing on the right reference model for our users. This ignite session will demonstrate how we landed on our current model which meets our user’s needs and maximizes efficiencies while capitalizing on the subject expertise of our library staff. It will showcase our shared virtual reference model and a tiered, user driven approach to providing in-depth reference where questions are “referred down” as well as up.

Library Types:
Academic

Subject Headings:
Personnel and Staffing, Reference Services, Support Staff, Training

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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Ignite sessions

Suggestion Please, Do Try This at Home: Teen Self-Care Week

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:55 am

Please, Do Try This at Home: Teen Self-Care Week

Speaker:

Nicole Palazzo, MLIS, Teen Librarian - Recent Graduate

Please, Do Try This at Home: Teen Self-Care Week

Speaker:

Nicole Palazzo, MLIS, Teen Librarian - Recent Graduate

Description:
Today's teens are busy. They've got a packed schedule from the moment they wake up (way too early in the morning) until the moment they go to sleep (way too late at night). This can be a big barrier to teens participating in library programs. But what if the program were about how to better handle that busy schedule? What if the program left them with helpful take-aways they could use in the future? Enter: Teen Self-Care Week, five days of after school drop-in activities to relieve stress, get in touch with your thoughts and feelings, and care for your body. In this Ignite session, I will share what I focused on each day, how it went, and any advice for potential replication.

Library Types:
High School, Middle School, Public, School/Media Center, Student

Subject Headings:
Community Engagement, Popular Culture, Public Programs, Readers’ Advisory, Rural and Small Libraries, Young Adult Services

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