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ACRL (Association of College and Research Libraries)

Event The Role of the Librarian in Combating Student Plagiarism (ACRL e-Learning Webcast)

by David Free (staff) on Fri, Sep 18, 2009 at 04:50 pm

Like other educators, librarians are aware of the growing instances of student plagiarism and academic dishonesty that take place on college campuses. Librarians frequently anecdotally discuss discipline faculty’s revulsion toward the growth of student plagiarism that has seemingly grown in tandem with our society’s dependence on digital texts found on the Internet. We acknowledge that this problem is often an effective hook to convince reluctant faculty to bring students into the library for instruction.

Like other educators, librarians are aware of the growing instances of student plagiarism and academic dishonesty that take place on college campuses. Librarians frequently anecdotally discuss discipline faculty’s revulsion toward the growth of student plagiarism that has seemingly grown in tandem with our society’s dependence on digital texts found on the Internet. We acknowledge that this problem is often an effective hook to convince reluctant faculty to bring students into the library for instruction. However once we get these professors and students into our library classrooms, we typically have a hard time presenting curricular content that focuses on anti-plagiarism student learning outcomes and/or developing additional outreach techniques that can be included in information literacy outreach and instruction to both faculty and students.

Visit http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/events/elearning/courses/plagiarism.cfm for more information and to register.

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ACRL (Association of College and Research Libraries)

Event H1N1 and the Library Response (ACRL OnPoint chat)

by David Free (staff) on Fri, Sep 18, 2009 at 04:42 pm

This free discussion will focus on how libraries are responding to the threat of the H1N1 virus and other similar viruses. Questions to be asked will include: Does the library have a role on campus in helping to prevent viral epidemics? What are current practices for preventing the spread of the H1N1 virus in libraries? How might the library play an educational role in H1N1 and other virus awareness?

This free discussion will focus on how libraries are responding to the threat of the H1N1 virus and other similar viruses. Questions to be asked will include: Does the library have a role on campus in helping to prevent viral epidemics? What are current practices for preventing the spread of the H1N1 virus in libraries? How might the library play an educational role in H1N1 and other virus awareness? This month’s chat is convened by: Marcia Thomas, Director of Collections & Technical Services, Illinois Wesleyan University and Meg Miner, University Archivist & Special Collections Librarian, Illinois Wesleyan University.

Visit the ACRL OnPoint Web site at http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/events/onpoint/index.cfm for complete details and login information.

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ACRL (Association of College and Research Libraries)

Event Next Generation Information Commons: Retooling and Refining the Vision (ACRL e-Learning Webcast)

by David Free (staff) on Fri, Sep 18, 2009 at 04:39 pm

Some information commons are now more than ten years old and are in need of refreshing in terms of conception, configuration, technologies, and services. Others are so popular that additions are planned, either adjacent to the existing commons, on other floors, or in other buildings on campus. Through the use of principles and practical examples, participants will learn about trends in information and learning commons. A wide variety of photos will be used to illustrate the presentation.

Some information commons are now more than ten years old and are in need of refreshing in terms of conception, configuration, technologies, and services. Others are so popular that additions are planned, either adjacent to the existing commons, on other floors, or in other buildings on campus. Through the use of principles and practical examples, participants will learn about trends in information and learning commons. A wide variety of photos will be used to illustrate the presentation.

Visit http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/events/elearning/courses/nextgeninfocommons.cfm for more information and to register.

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ACRL (Association of College and Research Libraries)

Event Instructional Design for Online Teaching and Learning (ACRL Online Seminar begins)

by David Free (staff) on Fri, Sep 18, 2009 at 04:37 pm

In this four week hands-on course the intellectual focus will be on using good instructional design and Web page design principles. Participants will also be introduced to Web-based Teaching techniques and materials using standard Web pages and the Moodle LMS. This course requires a significant amount of hands-on learning-activities , project work, and readings. This work will result in a completed instructional design plan for an instructional unit - course/workshop/tutorial - of the participants choice for a learner group of their choice with teacher guidance and approval.

In this four week hands-on course the intellectual focus will be on using good instructional design and Web page design principles. Participants will also be introduced to Web-based Teaching techniques and materials using standard Web pages and the Moodle LMS. This course requires a significant amount of hands-on learning-activities , project work, and readings. This work will result in a completed instructional design plan for an instructional unit - course/workshop/tutorial - of the participants choice for a learner group of their choice with teacher guidance and approval.

Visit http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/events/elearning/courses/instdesign.cfm for more information and to register.

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ACRL (Association of College and Research Libraries)

Event Copyright and the Library Part 1: The Basics Including the DMCA (ACRL Online Seminar begins)

by David Free (staff) on Fri, Sep 18, 2009 at 04:33 pm

In this course, students will learn to think in terms of U.S. copyright law. Students will focus on building understanding of current copyright law, creating a “copyright palette” for their libraries, and assessing a library’s legal risk with regard to current U.S. copyright law. Additionally, students will build an understanding of the Fair Use clause, as well as how to legally apply fair use in the library, classroom, and broader campus environments.

In this course, students will learn to think in terms of U.S. copyright law. Students will focus on building understanding of current copyright law, creating a “copyright palette” for their libraries, and assessing a library’s legal risk with regard to current U.S. copyright law. Additionally, students will build an understanding of the Fair Use clause, as well as how to legally apply fair use in the library, classroom, and broader campus environments.

Visit http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/events/elearning/courses/copyright1.cfm for complete details and to register.

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ACRL (Association of College and Research Libraries)

Event Information Commons 101 (ACRL e-Learning Webcast)

by David Free (staff) on Fri, Sep 18, 2009 at 04:28 pm

Is your institution in the planning phase for a library renovation or addition that includes a space that will serve as an information or learning commons? If so, this webcast will provide an overview of some of the key planning components you should take into consideration as you develop a program for the facility. Today’s information or learning commons combine access to digital and print content, access to technology, access to expert assistance, and often access to other campus services.

Is your institution in the planning phase for a library renovation or addition that includes a space that will serve as an information or learning commons? If so, this webcast will provide an overview of some of the key planning components you should take into consideration as you develop a program for the facility. Today’s information or learning commons combine access to digital and print content, access to technology, access to expert assistance, and often access to other campus services. Many institutions focus on selecting furniture and choosing equipment as they plan their commons, and they postpone discussion of some of the elements that can actually be key to the success of their facility – namely, the kinds of services that will be offered and the kinds of staff expertise that will be available.

Visit http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/events/elearning/courses/infocommons101.cfm for more information and to register.

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ACRL (Association of College and Research Libraries)

Event Podcasting for Libraries (ACRL e-Learning Webcast)

by David Free (staff) on Fri, Sep 18, 2009 at 04:26 pm

Podcasting is like an Internet radio show, or a blog with audio. It uses the power of RSS syndication to automatically deliver new episodes to listeners. There are millions of podcasts available, covering nearly any topic imaginable. Any library can produce a podcast using free software and inexpensive hardware. If you can post to a blog and talk into a microphone, you can create a podcast. How can your library use podcasting as a tool for teaching, promotion, outreach and programming?

Podcasting is like an Internet radio show, or a blog with audio. It uses the power of RSS syndication to automatically deliver new episodes to listeners. There are millions of podcasts available, covering nearly any topic imaginable. Any library can produce a podcast using free software and inexpensive hardware. If you can post to a blog and talk into a microphone, you can create a podcast. How can your library use podcasting as a tool for teaching, promotion, outreach and programming?

Visit http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/events/elearning/courses/podcasting.cfm for more information and to register.

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Drupal4Lib Interest Group (LITA)

Discussion Looking Good: 26 Sign-ups for our Chicagoland Drupal4Lib BoF on Friday (9/25, 2pm)!

by Leo Klein on Fri, Sep 18, 2009 at 01:46 pm

Drupalicon Just got word that 26 people have already signed up for the Chicagoland Drupal4Lib BoF that we're having next Friday (9/25, 2p-4p) at the offices of the Metropolitan Library System (i.e. across the street from the Art Institute).

This is great news. I'll be doing something on publication workflows based (loosely) on 'Using Drupal' (chap. 6). If we have time, I can also talk about my adventures with data migration and import.

We're kind of reaching our limit but people can still register (for free) at:
http://www.librarylearning.info/events/?eventID=5356

See you next Friday!

Drupalicon Just got word that 26 people have already signed up for the Chicagoland Drupal4Lib BoF that we're having next Friday (9/25, 2p-4p) at the offices of the Metropolitan Library System (i.e. across the street from the Art Institute).

This is great news. I'll be doing something on publication workflows based (loosely) on 'Using Drupal' (chap. 6). If we have time, I can also talk about my adventures with data migration and import.

We're kind of reaching our limit but people can still register (for free) at:
http://www.librarylearning.info/events/?eventID=5356

See you next Friday!

More...
ALA Committee on Literacy

Discussion Carnegie Report: A time to Act, an agenda for advancing adolescent literacy.

by Dale Lipschultz (staff) on Fri, Sep 18, 2009 at 12:55 pm

The first thing that I find striking about this report is the way that it's being released and promoted. In recent years, the meaning of literacy has been seriously diluted -- by the media, by popular culture, and in part, by all of us. The brief release that went out to the philanthropic community includes a quote about the importance and essential value of creating a 'culture of literacy'. The authors and the Carnegie Foundation are not talking about 21st Century literacy and all its many iterations -- media, digital, cultural.

The first thing that I find striking about this report is the way that it's being released and promoted. In recent years, the meaning of literacy has been seriously diluted -- by the media, by popular culture, and in part, by all of us. The brief release that went out to the philanthropic community includes a quote about the importance and essential value of creating a 'culture of literacy'. The authors and the Carnegie Foundation are not talking about 21st Century literacy and all its many iterations -- media, digital, cultural. They're talking about basic literacy -- learning to read and write and mastering these essential skills. It's a refreshing and necessary cultural shift.

I went on to read the executive summary and noted with pleasure and a bit of relief that the authors hit all the right notes. They noted and applauded the progress we've made in early and emergent literacy before addressing the real issue -- adolescent literacy. It's a complex issue that demands and deserves attention at the highest level. The authors address the impact and implications of not addressing this issue now -- undereducated adults who can't compete or even participate in the 21st century workforce and contribute to the economy.

I smiled broadly when I read their vision statement. Their vision is Literacy for All!

We've know this for a very long time and it's nice to see this recognized. I will read the report over the next week with the knowledge that libraries have an essential role to play.

I hope that you'll do the same and join the discussion. In the meantime, I'm going to spread this far and wide. Please forgive the duplication.

Sincerely,

Dale 

http://carnegie.org/literacy/tta/pdf/tta_Main.pdf

More...
Literacy for All

Discussion Carnegie Report: A time to Act, an agenda for advancing adolescent literacy.

by Dale Lipschultz (staff) on Fri, Sep 18, 2009 at 12:54 pm

The first thing that I find striking about this report is the way that it's being released and promoted. In recent years, the meaning of literacy has been seriously diluted -- by the media, by popular culture, and in part, by all of us. The brief release that went out to the philanthropic community includes a quote about the importance and essential value of creating a 'culture of literacy'. The authors and the Carnegie Foundation are not talking about 21st Century literacy and all its many iterations -- media, digital, cultural.

The first thing that I find striking about this report is the way that it's being released and promoted. In recent years, the meaning of literacy has been seriously diluted -- by the media, by popular culture, and in part, by all of us. The brief release that went out to the philanthropic community includes a quote about the importance and essential value of creating a 'culture of literacy'. The authors and the Carnegie Foundation are not talking about 21st Century literacy and all its many iterations -- media, digital, cultural. They're talking about basic literacy -- learning to read and write and mastering these essential skills. It's a refreshing and necessary cultural shift.

I went on to read the executive summary and noted with pleasure and a bit of relief that the authors hit all the right notes. They noted and applauded the progress we've made in early and emergent literacy before addressing the real issue -- adolescent literacy. It's a complex issue that demands and deserves attention at the highest level. The authors address the impact and implications of not addressing this issue now -- undereducated adults who can't compete or even participate in the 21st century workforce and contribute to the economy.

I smiled broadly when I read their vision statement. Their vision is Literacy for All!

We've known this for a very long time and it's nice to see this recognized. I will read the report over the next week with the knowledge that libraries have an essential role to play.

I hope that you'll do the same and join the discussion. In the meantime, I'm going to spread this far and wide. Please forgive the duplication.

Sincerely,

Dale 

http://carnegie.org/literacy/tta/pdf/tta_Main.pdf

More...

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