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ASCLA ICAN (Interlibrary Cooperation and Networking Section)

Online Doc ICAN Physical Delivery Discussion Group

by Valerie Horton on Tue, Aug 4, 2009 at 05:38 pm


ASCLA ICAN

Physical Delivery Discussion Group


ASCLA ICAN

Physical Delivery Discussion Group

ALA Midwinter MINUTES

 

Location: Sunday, January 25, 2009, 8-10am, Denver Marriot City Center, Room: Denver BR III

 

1.     Meeting called to order by Valerie Horton. 

·       Next meeting: ALA Annual, Chicago, Sunday morning 8-10am. 

·       Next Moving Mountains conference: Atlanta 2010

 

2.     Christa Starck reported that OCLC is working with Better World Books (BWB) to offer home delivery starting sometime in 2009.  In the pilot 60% are currently shipping for $15 or less, and items can be purchased by patron or library or returned to BWB.

 

3.     Rethinking Resource Sharing Physical Delivery Task Force.  Melissa Stockton reported that the group is focusing on home delivery and how digitization impacts delivery.  The group is mainly made up of consortial delivery people.  RSS is a user-focused group, and has international connections.

 

4.     NISO Standards for Physical Delivery.  Karen Wetzel, NISO, discussed the creation of a recommended practices document for library delivery.  It would be for librarians, vendors and consortia.  There was a discussion of definitions of terms like resource sharing, interlibrary loan, direct consortial borrowing, and reciprocal borrowing.  It was pretty clear that we do not all agree on the terminology commonly in use.

 

5.     Greg Pronevitz reported on a 2008 survey with 90 respondents on delivery.  Library delivery systems are moving between 100,000 to 10 million items.  He sought input on what should be included in a follow up 2010 survey.

 

6.     Valerie Horton led a discussion on how much we are paying for USPS nationwide.  The point was to identify number for Return on Investment consideration.  After much discussion, the magic number of $4.00 per one way USPS likely included all costs of delivery by mail (packaging, labor, transport, storage, mailing costs).  Given that OCLC does 10 million ILL transactions a year, 90% of them in the US, and roughly half are returnables – libraries could be paying $20,000,000 or more to the post office a year to ship ILL via USPS.

 

7.     Valerie asked what topics would the group like to see for nationwide webinars. The following topics were identified:

·       High volume – improving efficiency

·       Contracting, choosing a courier vendor

·       Evaluation your costs/lower costs/ ROI

·       Statistics

·       Book reselling

·       In-house or outsources options

·       Automated sorting

 

8.     We discussed how to sort.  Suggestions were to limit to groups of 20 bins to reducing steps.  Use a short code 3 to 4 characters – based on brain studies on ‘chunking’. 

 

9.      “Moving Materials: Physical Delivery in Libraries” by Valerie Horton and Bruce Smith, with 9 contributors, will be released by ALA in fall of 2009.

 

 

 

 

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ASCLA ICAN (Interlibrary Cooperation and Networking Section)

Discussion ICAN Physical Delivery Discussion Group

by Valerie Horton on Tue, Aug 4, 2009 at 05:34 pm

ASCLA ICAN Physical Delivery Discussion Group Minutes

ASCLA ICAN Physical Delivery Discussion Group Minutes

July 12, 2009

 

ASCLA ICAN Physical Delivery Discussion Group met at ALA in Chicago on July 12th.  The group elected a new co-convener, Greg Pronevitz.  Valerie Horton will stay on for one more year as co-convener. 

 

  1. Valerie Horton (CLiC) spoke about improvements to the Moving Mountains webpage.  We know have nine delivery RFP’s available and three library delivery consultants listed.  If your library delivery service is not listed or if you have a RFP, user guides, PR, etc, send them to Valerie at vhorton@clicweb.org and she’ll get them up on the website.

 

  1. Melissa Stockton (Quipu Group) reported on the Rethinking Resource Sharing Delivery Task Force which has members from across the country and Europe.  The group meets monthly by phone.  The Task Force spend much of last year getting organized and selecting home delivery (including creating an international brand), links between delivery and digitization, and international delivery as its focus. 

 

  1. Karen Wetzel (NISO) reported on progress towards getting a ‘standard practices’ document created for library delivery.  While the project has been positively received by the NISO community of library practitioners, vendors and others; problems in committee membership delayed a vote on accepting Valerie Horton’s proposal.  A re-vote will be taking place shortly and hopefully, standard practices will be developed in the next 18 months.  There will be a call for volunteers to be on the committee after approval, a substantial time commitment is required. 

 

  1. Greg Pronevitz (NMRLS) reported on Massachusetts’ huge project to consolidate sorting and delivery in the state, all with the goal of saving participating libraries time and money.  MA is moving and sorting over 13 million items.  A statewide study of 537 libraries in six delivery systems using nine ILS was conducted by Lori Ayres and Melissa Stockton.  The results of the study are available at www.nmrls.org/msdc.  Massachusetts has three ongoing working groups: 1) Sorting/automation, 2) Ergonomics, and 3) packing labeling.  And RFP is currently out to vendors.

 

Greg also mentioned a sorting error study that found that an all numeric code had a .6 error rate, and a short text based code had a .7 error rate. Not a huge difference until one considers that 13,000,000 items are moving.  The region that had the fore-mentioned .1% higher error rate processes about 3.3 million items per year. Massachusetts estimates about $2.50 if total costs for delivery and library labor per item for a round trip. This additional error rate adds $4,125 to costs per year in that region.  The question was raised did MA check error rates on sorting long alpha numeric strings such as the post office address,  but they had not.

 

The state hopes to require minimal packaging and the elimination of hand printed labels which was found to significantly increase error rates. Finally, MA is coming out with a two hour humorous training video on delivery issues that might be applicable to others.

5.     Michael Piper (PALS) spoke briefly about a New Jersey project based loosely on the Netflix model.  It generated a discussion about the impact of charging for delivery.  The project is still quite new and Michael agreed to watch it for the group and report more in the future.  (After the meeting Valerie checked and found that Boise Public Library is charging $2 per home delivery to patrons.)

 

6.     Valerie reported on the success of the new COKAMO project which offers a new delivery service to member libraries in Missouri, Colorado and parts of Kansas.  As anticipated, arranging the physical delivery was not the hard part, rather agreements on packaging, labeling and arranging for a reciprocal borrowing network through OCLC were the time consuming parts. With two months, COKAMO libraries were shipping 1,000 items a week and the numbers are still growing rapidly.  A number of libraries that originally choose not to participate are asking to join the reciprocal borrowing group.

 

 The libraries involved love the project, the courier managers (Valerie from Colorado and Susan Burton from KCLMIN, worry about keeping it cost and labor effective).  They are also talking to the Amigos delivery system to explore the possibility of expanding into Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico and Arkansas next year.

 

7.     Valerie also reported on a Colorado project called No Store which is picking up library and friends group discard from twenty-five libraries in Colorado.   The project is called No Store to reinforce one of the advantages, namely that libraries can get rid of discards immediately rather than having to store them.  The items are sorted at the contract vendor, American Courier, and

·       To BCR’s Shelf-2-Life program: a pre-1923 copyright digitization service

·       To either book resellers BLogistics or Better World Books.  From there some items are donated to charities for reuse, some are sold, and many are recycled.

·       Directly to a recycler who guarantees the books are pulped and resold.

With four months, the project grew rapidly from the first five pilots to over 25, and continues to grow.  However, revenue has not been adequate to cover costs so far.  Colorado is going to give the project a year to see if the revenue increases enough to sustain the project. 

 

8.     Diana Silveira (TBLC) recently completed an RFP which received nine vendors bid including UPS and FedEx.  Florida selected their current vendor but at a substantial price decrease.  The lowered price allowed Florida to drop 2 day delivery and now has a 3 day week minimum.  They also gave up paying for lost books and cut prices to rural libraries.  Diana has been using a GPS Tracker to test delivery times.  They hollowed out a book, place the tracker, and they can track the books physical movement on the Internet.  Everyone wanted the information on which tracker they selected, and Diana promised to post the information on the device she selected from the Spy Store on the Moving Mountains Listserv. 

 

9.     Kathy Drozd (Minitex) spoke about using ½ hour webinars to small, targeted groups of libraries across her large geographic delivery range.  These small groups have facilitated group participations and been a huge success for Minitex in identifying the hidden problems.

 

Next meeting, 2010 ALA Midwinter, Boston, Sunday, 8-10am, January 17, 2010.  Greg Pronevitz will convene the group.

 

 

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Second Life Users Group

Discussion Hear excerpt from The Time Traveler's Wife: Unabridged Edition Audiobook on ALA Island in Second Life®

by Valerie Hawkins (staff) on Tue, Aug 4, 2009 at 05:16 pm

CHICAGO – ALA Island, the Second Life® (SL) virtual world presence of the American Library Association (ALA), has been granted permission by the HighBridge Company to make a six-minute excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Wife: Unabridged Edition audiobook available to its avatar visitors.

CHICAGO – ALA Island, the Second Life® (SL) virtual world presence of the American Library Association (ALA), has been granted permission by the HighBridge Company to make a six-minute excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Wife: Unabridged Edition audiobook available to its avatar visitors.

ALALibraryVal Miles at Story Hour Garden, beside The Time Traveler's Wife Sign

ALALibraryVal Miles at Story Hour Garden, beside The Time Traveler's Wife Sign

 

SL residents can teleport to Story Hour Garden on ALA Island (25, 101, 21) at http://slurl.com/secondlife/ALA%20Island/25/101/21> to hear the excerpt from this audio version of Audrey Niffenegger’s 2003 bestselling novel, The Time Traveler’s Wife, a 2004 Alex Award winner, whose eponymous film version starring Eric Bana and Rachel McAdams opens in the USA, the UK and Canada, on Aug. 14, 2009.

Actress Rachel McAdams holds The Time Traveler’s Wife novel in one of ALA’s newest celebrity READ posters, now available from the ALA Online Store.

Winner of a 2006 AudioFile Earphones Award, The Time Traveler’s Wife: Unabridged Edition is read by William Hope, whose previous audiobook work includes Henry David Thoreau’s Walden, and by Laurel Lefkow, whose previous audiobook work includes Lauren Weisberger’s The Devil Wears Prada.

To make sure the excerpt can be heard properly, Second Life® avatars should click their Viewer’s Edit menu and select Preferences, and then click the Audio & Video tab to see that the box next to Play Streaming Media When Available is checked in. On the bottom right of the Viewer is the in-world media player; click the arrow beside the illuminated audio icon to begin playing the audio stream.

ALA Island was recently featured in the Library Showcase of ALA’s I Love Libraries, at ALA Island: A Community Information Center for Second Life from the American Library Association. And Story Hour Garden on ALA Island is an extensive fantasy garden area created by Second Life® avatar Jedda Zenovka and named by Second Life® avatar contest winner Bookie Balogh.

HighBridge Company is an audio publisher of unabridged audiobooks (CD and digital download), including public radio favorites Garrison Keillor’s A Prairie Home Companion, Car Talk and Fresh Air with Terry Gross.

ALA Store purchases fund advocacy, awareness, and accreditation programs for library professionals worldwide.

 

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Virtual Communities and Libraries

Discussion Hear excerpt from The Time Traveler's Wife: Unabridged Edition Audiobook on ALA Island in Second Life®

by Valerie Hawkins (staff) on Tue, Aug 4, 2009 at 05:15 pm

CHICAGO – ALA Island, the Second Life® (SL) virtual world presence of the American Library Association (ALA), has been granted permission by the HighBridge Company to make a six-minute excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Wife: Unabridged Edition audiobook available to its avatar visitors.

CHICAGO – ALA Island, the Second Life® (SL) virtual world presence of the American Library Association (ALA), has been granted permission by the HighBridge Company to make a six-minute excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Wife: Unabridged Edition audiobook available to its avatar visitors.

ALALibraryVal Miles at Story Hour Garden, beside The Time Traveler's Wife Sign

ALALibraryVal Miles at Story Hour Garden, beside The Time Traveler's Wife Sign

 

SL residents can teleport to Story Hour Garden on ALA Island (25, 101, 21) at http://slurl.com/secondlife/ALA%20Island/25/101/21> to hear the excerpt from this audio version of Audrey Niffenegger’s 2003 bestselling novel, The Time Traveler’s Wife, a 2004 Alex Award winner, whose eponymous film version starring Eric Bana and Rachel McAdams opens in the USA, the UK and Canada, on Aug. 14, 2009.

Actress Rachel McAdams holds The Time Traveler’s Wife novel in one of ALA’s newest celebrity READ posters, now available from the ALA Online Store.

Winner of a 2006 AudioFile Earphones Award, The Time Traveler’s Wife: Unabridged Edition is read by William Hope, whose previous audiobook work includes Henry David Thoreau’s Walden, and by Laurel Lefkow, whose previous audiobook work includes Lauren Weisberger’s The Devil Wears Prada.

To make sure the excerpt can be heard properly, Second Life® avatars should click their Viewer’s Edit menu and select Preferences, and then click the Audio & Video tab to see that the box next to Play Streaming Media When Available is checked in. On the bottom right of the Viewer is the in-world media player; click the arrow beside the illuminated audio icon to begin playing the audio stream.

ALA Island was recently featured in the Library Showcase of ALA’s I Love Libraries, at ALA Island: A Community Information Center for Second Life from the American Library Association. And Story Hour Garden on ALA Island is an extensive fantasy garden area created by Second Life® avatar Jedda Zenovka and named by Second Life® avatar contest winner Bookie Balogh.

HighBridge Company is an audio publisher of unabridged audiobooks (CD and digital download), including public radio favorites Garrison Keillor’s A Prairie Home Companion, Car Talk and Fresh Air with Terry Gross.

ALA Store purchases fund advocacy, awareness, and accreditation programs for library professionals worldwide.

 

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Dog-Loving Librarians who Knit and watch Lost

Discussion Still chuckling over the video

by Kim Leeder Reed on Wed, Jul 29, 2009 at 01:59 pm

This is the most hilarious ALA community of all! How fun. Sounds like a very elite group...

YALSA (Young Adult Library Services Association)

Event YALSA Online Chat: Taking Risks

by Stephanie Kuenn (staff) on Tue, Aug 4, 2009 at 09:22 am

This chat, held Aug. 5 from 8 to 9 p.m. Eastern, will give YALSA members a chance to talk about risk in libraries and how they make risk work for them in their careers and work with teens. It will also be a time for participants to ask questions about risk-taking and libraries. Connie Urquhart, Fresno County Public Library, and Linda Braun, YALSA President will facilitate the discussion.

Connie and Linda hope you'll think about these topics:

This chat, held Aug. 5 from 8 to 9 p.m. Eastern, will give YALSA members a chance to talk about risk in libraries and how they make risk work for them in their careers and work with teens. It will also be a time for participants to ask questions about risk-taking and libraries. Connie Urquhart, Fresno County Public Library, and Linda Braun, YALSA President will facilitate the discussion.

Connie and Linda hope you'll think about these topics:

  • What is risk and how does it play a role in teen librarianship?
  • How to be a smart risk-taker in the library and in a career?
  • What happens when a risk-taken doesn’t have the expected results?
  • How library programs and services can help teens be smart in their own risk-taking?
  • What stories do echat participants have about their own risk taking?
  • How can YALSA help members be smart about risk-taking in their careers?

Can't make the chat? The transcript will be posted on Thursday on the YALSA blog. YALSA will host e-chats on the first Wednesday of each month in its space in ALA Connect, which you can access by being a YALSA member.

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YALSA (Young Adult Library Services Association)

Event YALSA Online Chat: Teen Read Week

by Stephanie Kuenn (staff) on Tue, Aug 4, 2009 at 09:21 am

YALSA's September e-chat will focus on Teen Read Week. Join us from 8-9 p.m. Eastern on September 2 to talk about how you're celebrating Teen Read Week 2009.

YALSA holds e-chats on the first Wednesday of each month from 8 to 9 p.m. Eastern in its space in ALA Connect. Can't make the e-chat? The transcript will be posted online the next day at the YALSA Blog.

ALA Connect Help

Discussion ALA Connect Promotional Video

by Jenny Levine (staff) on Mon, Aug 3, 2009 at 09:32 pm

ALA was lucky enough to have a team of 2008-2009 Emerging Leaders participants create some promotional videos about ALA Connect. We'll be posting them all here in the video tutorials section, but here's the first one,which describes what we hope Connect's first phase provides for librarians.

SALALM: Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials

Discussion News & Events: New Benson Collection Web Exhibit

by Roberto Delgadillo on Mon, Aug 3, 2009 at 09:23 pm

Check out a new web exhibit of the Abel Briquet Photograph Collection held at the Benson Latin American Collection. The website features a selection of 64 photographs taken by Mr. Briquet in Mexico during the late 19th and early 20th century and includes brief biographical and historical information. Photograph subjects include railways, landscapes, architecture, street scenes and portraiture. UT School of Information student Rachel Little completed this exhibit as part of her summer internship at the Benson Collection.
 

Check out a new web exhibit of the Abel Briquet Photograph Collection held at the Benson Latin American Collection. The website features a selection of 64 photographs taken by Mr. Briquet in Mexico during the late 19th and early 20th century and includes brief biographical and historical information. Photograph subjects include railways, landscapes, architecture, street scenes and portraiture. UT School of Information student Rachel Little completed this exhibit as part of her summer internship at the Benson Collection.
 
I hope you have an opportunity to browse the exhibit as it provides a fascinating glimpse of Mexico at the turn of the 20th century.
http://www.lib.utexas.edu/benson/briquet/
 

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SALALM: Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials

Online Doc Journal Article of Interest: Librarian for Latin American and Caribbean Studies in U.S. Academic and Research Libraries: A Content Analysis of Position Announcements, 1970-2007

by Roberto Delgadillo on Mon, Aug 3, 2009 at 09:11 pm

Abstract:

The present research investigates the evolving requirements, roles, and responsibilities of the Latin American and Caribbean studies librarian. Content analysis was used to study 94 position announcements published from 1970 to 2007. Variables were examined from the following categories: position description, educational background, work experience, technology skills, languages, personal traits, duties, and subject responsibilities. Cross tabulations and chi-square tests were executed to determine the statistical significance of relationships between variables. An advanced degree in a related subject field is expected by employers. Strong Spanish language abilities are required, and a working knowledge of Portuguese is highly desirable. The average number of duties per announcement has increased over time, reflecting the evolution of the position from being narrowly specialized to being more diversified. The Latin American and Caribbean studies librarian may also be responsible for additional subjects, in particular Iberian studies.

Access: http://eprints.rclis.org/16516/

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