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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Ignite sessions

Suggestion Moving Beyond Sticky Notes: Making Design Thinking Work in the Real World

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:52 am

Moving Beyond Sticky Notes: Making Design Thinking Work in the Real World

Speaker:

Erin Berman, Innovations Manager, San Jose Public Library

Moving Beyond Sticky Notes: Making Design Thinking Work in the Real World

Speaker:

Erin Berman, Innovations Manager, San Jose Public Library

Description:
Design Thinking is often used at conferences or workshops to get people excited and show cool new tools that library staff can use to innovate. Yet while we feel energized at the workshop, many of us are unsure of how to turn those exercises into a practical application back at the library. During this Ignite Session, you'll learn a set of Design Thinking exercises, which build upon one another, providing a complete roadmap from problem to solution through to implementation. Walk away ready to dive into innovating and solving real world problems with confidence.

Library Types:
Public

Subject Headings:
Continuing Education, Training, Transforming Libraries

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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Ignite sessions

Suggestion Mission Impossible? Acquiring a New Logo for your Library

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:52 am

Mission Impossible? Acquiring a New Logo for your Library

Speaker:
Lesley Zavediuk, MLS, SHARE Resources Sharing and Circulation Specialist, Illinois Heartland Library System

Mission Impossible? Acquiring a New Logo for your Library

Speaker:
Lesley Zavediuk, MLS, SHARE Resources Sharing and Circulation Specialist, Illinois Heartland Library System

Description:
Your library's logo can leave a lasting impression on patrons and other community stakeholders, but does it really represent who you are? The Illinois Heartland Library System (IHLS) asked ourselves that very question as we embarked on a rebranding journey in 2016. Learn how we chose a new logo that better represents our mission and goals without breaking the bank. During the process we had a lot of fun, a little frustration, and learned what we want the future of IHLS to look like.

Library Types:
Consortium, Public, Regional System, Special

Subject Headings:
Marketing, Public Relations

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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Ignite sessions

Suggestion Millennial Librarians Have This To Say,,,

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:52 am

Millennial Librarians Have This To Say,,,

Speaker:

Stewart Brower, MLIS, AHIP, Director, Schusterman Library, University of Oklahoma-Tulsa

Millennial Librarians Have This To Say,,,

Speaker:

Stewart Brower, MLIS, AHIP, Director, Schusterman Library, University of Oklahoma-Tulsa

Description:
A recent survey of 541 Millennial librarians (born after 1982) revealed a great deal about their mentoring preferences. The results also included 131 candid remarks, discussing how they view themselves as Millennials. Here, we will let their comments speak for themselves and gain a fuller appreciation for the latest generation of librarians, their thoughts about being labelled "Millennials," and their hopes for the future of the profession. Or, to use the words of one respondent: "Please do not let the results of this survey, however conclusive they may be, allow readers to color an entire generation with broad strokes."

Library Types:
Academic, Community College, Corporate, Government, Public

Subject Headings:
Administration and Management, Leadership, Mentoring, Personnel and Staffing, Professional Development

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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Ignite sessions

Suggestion Memories of Migration

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:50 am

Memories of Migration

Speakers:

CHERYL EBERLY, Principal Librarian - Young Adult/Volunteers; Project Director - Memories of Migration, SANTA ANA PUBLIC LIBRARY

Jon Voss, Strategic Partnerships Director, Historypin

Memories of Migration

Speakers:

CHERYL EBERLY, Principal Librarian - Young Adult/Volunteers; Project Director - Memories of Migration, SANTA ANA PUBLIC LIBRARY

Jon Voss, Strategic Partnerships Director, Historypin

Description:
Memories of Migration is a three year, multi-partner project focused on creating a curriculum that will engage community members of all ages, and provide them with the skills to document their migration stories. Project material has been translated to Spanish and Mandarin to facilitate and encourage participation by community members.
The Santa Ana Public Library, in partnership with Historypin.org, Queens Borough Public Library, West Hartford Public Library, New Mexico Highlands University, developed a digital toolkit that will serve as a guide for other institutions to preserve their local narrative. This free resource will be available online by the end of the grant period in October 2017. In addition to the toolkit, an online archive has been created on Historypin.org to house materials collected for the project. As a publicly accessible collection, anyone with access to the internet can view curated stories or contribute their own; the hope is to not only preserve the stories, but also have them shared.
Our ignite session will consists of 2 presenters discussing several key aspects of the project. The following topics will be discussed: a brief overview of the Memories of Migration project, digital preservation utilizing Histroypin.org, the importance of incorporating STEM training in to the project curriculum, successful methods of community outreach and engagement, findings identified during the course of the project, such as the positive impact on the community – specifically on youth participants, and sustainability of the project after the grant period.

Library Types:
Academic, Community College, Elementary School, Federal, Government, High School, Middle School, Museum, Native, Nonprofit, Other, Public, Regional System, Rural, State Library, Student, Tribal

Subject Headings:
Community Engagement, Digitization, Diversity, Genealogy, International Issues, Multicultural Services, Preservation, Public Programs, Rural and Small Libraries, Urban Libraries, Virtual Communities and Libraries, Young Adult Services

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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Ignite sessions

Suggestion Media Binds or Blinds? Developing Global Competencies through Media and Information Literacy Toolbox

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:50 am

Media Binds or Blinds? Developing Global Competencies through Media and Information Literacy Toolbox

Speaker:

Melda N. Yildiz, Faculty, NYIT

Media Binds or Blinds? Developing Global Competencies through Media and Information Literacy Toolbox

Speaker:

Melda N. Yildiz, Faculty, NYIT

Description:
Situated within the context of global media education, this presentation aims to advance scientific knowledge of media and information literacy as a means to promote global education skills among information literacy specialists (ILS) and librarians and attempts to address deep-rooted ideologies to social inequities and misconceptions by creating a space to re-examine current curricula as opposed to transformative, collaborative, and inclusive curriculum.

As Ernest L. Boyer said: "It is no longer enough to simply read and write. Students must also become literate in the understanding of visual images. Our children must learn how to spot a stereotype, isolate a social cliche, and distinguish facts from propaganda, analysis from banter and important news from coverage."

To develop culturally and linguistically responsive pedagogy, educators investigated the transformative teaching models through the lens of multicultural education, semiotics, and media literacy in the global education context. For their lesson plans, the teacher candidates deconstructed and assessed the national curriculum, frameworks, and standards; interviewed students and educators, and documented their stories to articulate the realities of conditions in schools through their research, analysis, and dialogue. Through the rediscovery process, we explored and designed strategies, curricula, and programs for improving student outcomes, and integrated multiple literacies as a means of further developing P20 students’ global competencies and 21st-century skills while re-thinking and re-designing innovative learning activities.

This session promotes media education in deconstructing the myths and misconceptions in P20 classrooms, integrates community mapping and digital storytelling into the curriculum, offers creative suggestions for producing media in the classroom with minimal resources and equipment, and showcases innovative and inclusive projects and best practices for developing critical autonomy, global competency, and 21st century skills in MIL programs. We explored three key topics in order to understand the global educational experiences of the students: the wide range of meanings they associated with myth and misconceptions in P20 classrooms; the impact of developing transdisciplinary and innovative multimedia learning objects (modules) to promote MIL and assessment strategies on students’ reaction, and understanding of global issues; and the ways in which P20 students respond to Multicultural, Multilingual, Multimedia activities.

Resources will be shared at https://galeri.wikispaces.com/UNESCO

Library Types:
Academic, High School, Middle School, Museum, Nonprofit, Public, Research Library, School/Media Center, Undergraduate

Subject Headings:
Assessment and Evaluation, Electronic Resources, Equity of Access, Information Literacy, Library School Education, Literacy, Multicultural Services, Virtual Communities and Libraries

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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Ignite sessions

Suggestion Librarians As Civic Infiltrators

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:49 am

Librarians As Civic Infiltrators

Speakers:

Tara D'Amato, M.A., M.L.I.S., Assistant Director for Public Services, Mastics-Moriches-Shirley Library

Kerri Rosalia

Librarians As Civic Infiltrators

Speakers:

Tara D'Amato, M.A., M.L.I.S., Assistant Director for Public Services, Mastics-Moriches-Shirley Library

Kerri Rosalia

Description:
Stop begging people to use the library and learn how one simple phrase can make you indispensable to the community. At the MMS Library, we radically changed our outreach efforts over the course of 5 years by saying "yes we can help!" Instead of giving the same old presentations about library services, we started accepting almost every invitation to anything the community wanted us to be involved in. From food drives, to marching in parades, to inviting teachers to do summer storytimes, to helping coordinate National Night Out, our open ended question of "what could we do to help?" our community groups got answered in ways we never even dreamed of. Now, librarians and administrators hold officer positions in the local Chamber of Commerce, Rotary Club and Kiwanis Club and the library is considered an indispensable resource that gets asked to the table time and again to weigh in on important community issues, ranging from homelessness to infrastructure planning. Delivering on the answers to this question makes staff rethink their role in community engagement, and re-evaluate how communities actually see their library fitting into the fabric of everyday life. Learn what it takes to be a flip your library outreach and forge deep and meaningful connections with your community.

Library Types:
Nonprofit, Public

Subject Headings:
Community Engagement, Leadership, Networking, Organizational Change, Outreach Services, Public Relations, Social Change, Transforming Libraries

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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Ignite sessions

Suggestion Let's Give Them Something to Talk About, Teen Space Conversations

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:48 am

Let's Give Them Something to Talk About, Teen Space Conversations

Speaker:

Brigeen Houghton

Let's Give Them Something to Talk About, Teen Space Conversations

Speaker:

Brigeen Houghton

Description:
Well versed in the ways of social media and technology, many of today’s teens have lost the art of conversation. Is conversation really necessary? As it turns out, while texting and social media are more efficient in our rush-rush society it can’t always replace for face to face conversation. Sherry Turkle, author of Reclaiming Conversations the Power of Talk in a Digital Age, describes this as the difference between unitasking and hyper attention. Apparently, unitasking, devoting your attention to one medium like a book or face to face conversation increases the depth of your concentration, while hyper attention splits your attention between multiple mediums of learning. Turkle states, “What is most enriching is having fluency in both deep and hyper attention. This is attentional pluralism and it should be our educational goal.”
Face to face conversations build unitasking skills, personal connection, and creativity. Talking with a sympathetic listener encourages self-discovery and gives teens practice at developing vocabulary to express and support their ideas and perspectives. Teens solve problems and organize their thoughts by talking about important issues. Language promotes thinking which develops reasoning. When libraries organize opportunities for teens to have conversations about what they read, their interests, and their community they foster complex thinking, empathy, and good citizenship.
How can we get the conversation started? Book clubs, poetry slams, makerspaces, peer to peer homework help, and teen scenes all give teens a chance to inquire, reflect and learn through conversation. Libraries can promote literacy and a sense of community with their teens through these conversations. So unplug your device and power up your smile, the teen section of your library is interested in listening.

Library Types:
Community College, Elementary School, High School, Joint Use, Middle School, Public, Rural, School/Media Center, Student, Undergraduate

Subject Headings:
Advocacy, Children’s Services, Diversity, Information Commons, Intellectual Freedom, Literacy, Outreach Services, Popular Culture, Rural and Small Libraries, Social Change, Transforming Libraries, Urban Libraries, Young Adult Services, Youth Services

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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Ignite sessions

Suggestion I Missed the Event Planning Class in Library School: How to Plan Programs with a Library Degree

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:48 am

I Missed the Event Planning Class in Library School: How to Plan Programs with a Library Degree

Speakers:

Caitlin Rietzen, Librarian II, Business Resource & Innovation Center at the Free Library of Philadelphia

Gillian Robbins

Caitlin Seifritz

I Missed the Event Planning Class in Library School: How to Plan Programs with a Library Degree

Speakers:

Caitlin Rietzen, Librarian II, Business Resource & Innovation Center at the Free Library of Philadelphia

Gillian Robbins

Caitlin Seifritz

Description:
Let’s set the scene: it’s an hour before your program is set to start, the program space isn’t set up, the copy machine is on the fritz again and you can’t print handouts, and your speaker is running late. Amidst the chaos you wonder to yourself why you didn’t have an event planning class in library school. But then you remember you are a librarian and this is just another fire and you’re a pro at putting them out.

Having offered over 140 public programs in 2016 the librarians in the Business Resource & Innovation Center (BRIC) at the Free Library of Philadelphia (FLP) are all too familiar with this scenario. While there will always be unknowns when it comes to planning and executing programs, the BRIC librarians have tapped into their skills as educators, researchers, customer service mavens, and organizational wizards to embrace and excel at executing programs.

During this session we will discuss outreach efforts to local businesses, organizations, and individuals who provide partnerships and support for programs. We will also discuss how we identify what programs our community needs, how to make these programs relevant to a diverse audience, how we develop classes, or court appropriate partners when there is a need.

You will walk away from this session feeling more confident in your ability to provide high-quality and relevant programs to your library’s community, whether or not you took an event planning class in library school.

Library Types:
Library School, Nonprofit, Other, Public, Special, Student

Subject Headings:
Adult Services, Advocacy, Community Engagement, Instruction, Librarianship, Marketing, Networking, New ALA Members, Outreach Services, Partnerships, Public Programs, Public Services, Social Media & Networks, Urban Libraries

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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Ignite sessions

Suggestion I got the job! Now what?

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:38 am

I got the job! Now what?

Speaker:

Marissa Richardson, Librarian, Queens Library 

I got the job! Now what?

Speaker:

Marissa Richardson, Librarian, Queens Library 

Description:
You've been looking for a job for a long time. Good news is that you got the job of your dreams! Bad news? It's in the next city, next state, or next country to where you live? Do you and your family want to move? How do you move for a job and what does it take? And when you do get to the place where you fit in this new place. Learn how to make those decisions and learn how to be the new kid in town.

Library Types:
Public

Subject Headings:
New ALA Members, Personnel and Staffing

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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Ignite sessions

Suggestion How could they do that? Using a DataRescue event to inform the public about evaporating government web sites and how to protect public data. This panel will discuss their experiences in hosting DataRescue events.

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:38 am

How could they do that? Using a DataRescue event to inform the public about evaporating government web sites and how to protect public data. This panel will discuss their experiences in hosting DataRescue events.

Speakers:

Maya Anjur-Dietrich, Ph.D. Applied Physics (expected), B.S. Bioengineering, Graduate student at Harvard University, EDGI (Environmental Data and Governance Initiative)

How could they do that? Using a DataRescue event to inform the public about evaporating government web sites and how to protect public data. This panel will discuss their experiences in hosting DataRescue events.

Speakers:

Maya Anjur-Dietrich, Ph.D. Applied Physics (expected), B.S. Bioengineering, Graduate student at Harvard University, EDGI (Environmental Data and Governance Initiative)

Heather Coates, MLIS, Digital Scholarship & Data Management Librarian and Liaison to the Fairbanks School of Public Health, IUPUI

Eric O. Johnson, MLIS, BS mechanical engineering, BS Agricultural Industries, MDiv, Data Librarian, Miami University

Alicia Kubas, MLIS, Government Publications and Regional Depository Librarian at University of Minnesota, U. of Minnesota

Description:
This panel will discuss the process, experience, and results of holding "DataRescue" events.

With every new presidential administration, government websites will change. Changes can be as minor as website header updates or as large as the removal of access to entire datasets, such as the case with the APHIS databases earlier this year. These data are critical for research, policy decisions, and an informed citizenry, but their availability is particularly vulnerable to changes in government funding and administrative policy. In addition, this data can become unavailable during government shutdowns and historic data can be lost if archival practices change over time.

The DataRescue movement attempts to protect at-risk federal data. This includes data related to climate change, racial or housing inequities, and other issues that the current administration doesn't support.

A DataRescue event is a scheduled gathering during which people identify data and websites in need of protection, download the data, add metadata, and send it to the Internet Archive or other repositories for storage and dissemination.

Keywords:

DataRefuge, DataRescue, at-risk-data, End of term web archive, data preservation, government information

Panelists:

Maya Anjur-Dietrich is part of the Environmental Data and Governance Initiative (EDGI), which co-organizes DataRescue events with DataRefuge at PPEH (Penn Program in the Environmental Humanities). She and her colleagues in EDGI and fellow event coordinators, Toly Rinberg and Andrew Bergman, have been involved in planning at least 4 DataRescue events, in addition to coordinating events nationally and providing support and training to local organizers for almost every one of the more than 25 events so far. She will speak about both DataRescue events and the next steps of local and community-based activities.

Heather Coates has been a co-coordinator for both of the DataRescueIndy events held at IUPUI (Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis) in Indianapolis. She will talk about their involvement and how IUPUI faculty are using #datarefuge to raise awareness of other data archiving, preservation, and sharing issues, to educate students about research policy, as well as to connect with community groups like the Indianapolis Code for America chapter (OpenIndyBrigade).

Alicia Kubas was the main organizer for the DataRescue-Twin Cities event in Minneapolis, MN. As a regional depository in the Federal Depository Library Program, the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities is committed to providing comprehensive access to government information and data. As the depository librarian, she sees DataRescue events as supporting this larger role in the government information landscape. She will also speak to the role of the university in supporting research needs through this initiative.

Eric Johnson was one of the organizers of the DataRescue event at Miami University and helped catalyze the university’s response to evaporating data.

Library Types:
Academic, Association, Community College, Consortium, Federal, Government, High School, Information-related Organization, Joint Use, Library School, Museum, Native, Nonprofit, Other, Public, Research Library, Rural, School/Media Center, Special, State Library, Student, Tribal, Undergraduate

Subject Headings:
Adult Services, Advocacy, Archives, Community Engagement, Continuing Education, Digitial Libraries, Disaster Planning, Diversity, Electronic Resources, Equity of Access, Ethics, Facilitation, Government Documents & Information, Institutional Repositories, Intellectual Freedom, Legislation, Marketing, Networking, Outreach Services, Popular Culture, Preservation, Public Relations, Public Services, Reference Services, Scholarly Communication, Social Change, Social Media & Networks, Strategic Planning, Transforming Libraries, Trends and Forecasting, Virtual Communities and Libraries

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