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ALA Council

Discussion ALA-APA 2010 Midwinter Meeting documents

by Jenifer Grady (non-member) on Fri, Jan 29, 2010 at 09:06 am

The ALA-APA documents from Midwinter are posted, including the new Salary- and Status-Related Policies.  Thank you.

http://www.ala-apa.org/about/documents.html.

snopesALA

Discussion ALA's Content Management System (CMS)

by David Vess on Wed, Jan 27, 2010 at 07:43 pm

A Content Management System is a system for managing content and providing it in various formats.  There are several types of content management systems but I'm focusing on ALA's Web Content Management System.

A Content Management System is a system for managing content and providing it in various formats.  There are several types of content management systems but I'm focusing on ALA's Web Content Management System.

Currently ALA is using the Serena Collage web content managment system (CMS).  Collage is no longer being developed by Serena.  ALA is shopping for a new CMS.  The ALA Content Management Taskforce of Website Advisory Committee (WAC) is hard at work dealing with ALA's future CMS.

In December the WAC CMS Selection Taskforce publicly released a Request For Proposals (RFP) for the migration of ALA's web site into a new content management system.  Responses to the RFP are requested by February 15, 2010.

Project Deadlines from the RFP: (NB: ALA’s fiscal year begins September 1st.)

  • Ballpark pricing (optional, and no legal hold-to, just very useful for assistance with our fiscal 2011 budget cycle): January 5, 2010
  • Proposals due February 15, 2010; early proposals welcome
  • Optional: Site visits by prospective vendors who wish to make presentations to staff: February – April, 2010
  • Project awarded: May 2010
  • Requirements document: August 1, 2010
  • Work to begin: September 1, 2010
  • Completion: No later than May, 2011

Currently, Drupal is being used as a content managment system for:

"Drupal is being strongly considered for the next ala.org CMS (we will continue to use Serena Collage for most of this year), a decision hasn't been made and we are open to all options, commercial or open-source."  -Sean Bires, ITTS (Information Technology and Telecommunication Services)

 

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LearnRT (Learning Round Table)

Discussion Call for Articles - LearningExchange

by Kimberly Chapman on Thu, Jan 28, 2010 at 10:17 pm

Learning Round Table Members:

We're gearing up to produce the next issue of the LearningExchange.

Do you have training ideas, suggestions or experiences to share? We'd love to hear from you!

Send your submission to editor@alalearning.org -

Deadline: February 8th, 2010, 5 pm PT

Kimberly Chapman and Dawn Lowe-Wincentsen
LearningExchange Editors

ALSC Managing Children's Services Committee

Discussion 2010 Midwinter Follow-Up--Autism Book List

by Sarah English (non-member) on Thu, Jan 28, 2010 at 08:19 pm

Thanks to Anitra for sharing this great autism book list with us!

Librarians who Love Cats (& dogs & other pets)

Discussion Should libraries keep pets?

by Diane Chen on Sun, Nov 15, 2009 at 08:33 pm

My Library Club recently decided they want to petition the principal to allow them to have a "library pet." They are gathering information about the types of pets, number of libraries that have them, safety and health concerns, and other issues they will face. They have asked me to ask you about this since they want to be able to refute any arguments knowledgeably. 

ALCTS Program Committee (Association for Library Collections and Technical Services)

Discussion ALCTS Programs & Pre-Conferences 2010

by Joyce McDonough on Thu, Jan 28, 2010 at 04:34 pm

The attached Excel workbook provides information about the programs and pre-conferences scheduled for the ALA Annual Conference in Washington, DC from June 25-June 29, 2010.  The program sessions are scheduled for Saturday, Sunday, & Monday of that period.

ACRL ULS (University Libraries Section)

Discussion A suggested protocol for conducting online chat meetings

by Kim Leeder Reed on Thu, Jan 28, 2010 at 03:53 pm
Note: Patricia Smith, Executive Director of the Texas Library Association, shared the following with me (which she received from someone else) and I thought I would pass it on. -Kim Leeder

The following is how we conducted the online chats.

Note: Patricia Smith, Executive Director of the Texas Library Association, shared the following with me (which she received from someone else) and I thought I would pass it on. -Kim Leeder

The following is how we conducted the online chats.

  1. Prior to chat, the agenda, moderator and protocol for responding is established and delivered via email.
  2. Upon logging into most chat rooms, you can see who has logged in first and so on.  This is how the moderator knows who gets the first opportunity to respond.
  3. The moderator begins his discussion and allows the first person who logged in to respond first.
  4. The next in line can respond accordingly or type "still thinking, pass" (or something similar). It then goes to the next person for a response (round robin style).  The moderator can also give the next in line ten seconds to respond and if nothing comes through, then the next person can jump in.

It may appear that it would go slowly, but it doesn't.  You can see when your turn comes up next, and very often someone has already asked the same question or made a similar statement so there is no need to repeat yourself and moves the chat along.  When we "chatted" in our UNT classes, there would be twenty of us in an online chat and it flowed very well because we all honored the process.

These rules are not set in stone, it can be modified and other formats may work better.  However, having been involved in several chats w/ many people, this process has worked best.

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Virtual Participation Resources

Online Doc Suggested protocol for online chat meetings

by Kim Leeder Reed on Thu, Jan 28, 2010 at 03:52 pm
Note: Patricia Smith, Executive Director of the Texas Library Association, shared the following with me (which she received from someone else) and I thought I would pass it on. -Kim Leeder

The following is how we conducted the online chats.

Note: Patricia Smith, Executive Director of the Texas Library Association, shared the following with me (which she received from someone else) and I thought I would pass it on. -Kim Leeder

The following is how we conducted the online chats.

  1. Prior to chat, the agenda, moderator and protocol for responding is established and delivered via email.
  2. Upon logging into most chat rooms, you can see who has logged in first and so on.  This is how the moderator knows who gets the first opportunity to respond.
  3. The moderator begins his discussion and allows the first person who logged in to respond first.
  4. The next in line can respond accordingly or type "still thinking, pass" (or something similar). It then goes to the next person for a response (round robin style).  The moderator can also give the next in line ten seconds to respond and if nothing comes through, then the next person can jump in.

It may appear that it would go slowly, but it doesn't.  You can see when your turn comes up next, and very often someone has already asked the same question or made a similar statement so there is no need to repeat yourself and moves the chat along.  When we "chatted" in our UNT classes, there would be twenty of us in an online chat and it flowed very well because we all honored the process.

These rules are not set in stone, it can be modified and other formats may work better.  However, having been involved in several chats w/ many people, this process has worked best.

More...
ALCTS

Discussion ALCTS Midwinter Forum: Mix and Match: Mashups of Bibliographic Data

by David Miller on Thu, Jan 7, 2010 at 09:11 am

Monday, January 18, 10:30 a.m - 12:00 p.m., in the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center, room 104A/B.

Monday, January 18, 10:30 a.m - 12:00 p.m., in the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center, room 104A/B.

This ALCTS Midwinter Forum on sharing and re-use of metadata will highlight the many ways in which metadata is now created and circulated among multiple types of participants in the resource chain. Not only are library databases making use of ONIX-derived metadata, but library-sourced metadata is also moving back out into the larger discovery environment represented by entities such as Google and Amazon. Panel speakers will describe the state of the art of metadata matchups from their points of view, describe the challenges and obstacles to greater sharing, and outline desirable next steps.

The panel will include Renee Register (Global Product Manager, OCLC Cataloging and Metadata Services), Karen Coyle (Open Library), and Kurt Groetsch (Google).

Renee Register:

Beginning with a "Next Generation Cataloging" project started in 2007 and leading into "Metadata Services for Publishers" launched in 2009, OCLC has committed to development that encourages greater interoperability and mash-up of publisher supply chain and library metadata. The current program adds publisher metadata to WorldCat through crosswalks from ONIX to MARC. Publisher data either enriches existing WorldCat records through the addition of content descriptions, contributor information, etc. or is used to build a new record in WorldCat when a match does not exist. Mining of FRBR work sets during the process adds further enrichment to WorldCat and publisher data. Publisher data enriched with authority controlled authors, classification, subject headings, etc. is crosswalked back out to ONIX for use in the publisher supply chain creating more robust data for libraries and other end-users in the web discovery environment.

Karen Coyle:

The Open Library has as its goal the creation of one web page for every book ever published. It does not, however, intend to look like a standard library catalog. While some library data has been used to seed the database, other data comes from online bookselling sites, publishers, and individual members of the Web public. To bring in users, the OL is remaking bibliographic data into an interactive site with an emphasis on Works, not Manifestations, and on navigation not searching.

Kurt Groetsch will discuss topics including the challenges of metadata reuse, metadata matching, and the challenges of working with multivolume works.

We look forward to seeing you there!

For more information, please contact David Miller (Curry College) at dmiller curry edu.

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