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ALA Governmental Information Subcommittee

Discussion ALA welcomes Open Government Plans

by Jessica McGilvray (staff) on Wed, Apr 7, 2010 at 01:34 pm

ALA welcomes Open Government Plans

U.S. departments and agencies today released their Open Government Plans in accordance to President Obama’s Open Government Directive issued on December 8, 2009. 

ALA welcomes Open Government Plans

U.S. departments and agencies today released their Open Government Plans in accordance to President Obama’s Open Government Directive issued on December 8, 2009. 

In his directive, the President stated that “Each agency shall develop and publish on its Open Government Webpage an Open Government Plan that will describe how it will improve transparency and integrate public participation and collaboration into its activities.”  

The ALA is excited the open government plans have been released, and we look forward to seeing how they are implemented in the agencies.  The ALA will be participating with www.openthegovernment.org in evaluating each open government plan, so look for more information about that soon. Click here to read more about this initiative on the White House.

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ALA E-Government Services Subcommittee

Discussion ALA welcomes Open Government Plans

by Jessica McGilvray (staff) on Wed, Apr 7, 2010 at 01:33 pm

ALA welcomes Open Government Plans

U.S. departments and agencies today released their Open Government Plans in accordance to President Obama’s Open Government Directive issued on December 8, 2009. 

ALA welcomes Open Government Plans

U.S. departments and agencies today released their Open Government Plans in accordance to President Obama’s Open Government Directive issued on December 8, 2009. 

In his directive, the President stated that “Each agency shall develop and publish on its Open Government Webpage an Open Government Plan that will describe how it will improve transparency and integrate public participation and collaboration into its activities.”  

The ALA is excited the open government plans have been released, and we look forward to seeing how they are implemented in the agencies.  The ALA will be participating with www.openthegovernment.org in evaluating each open government plan, so look for more information about that soon. Click here to read more about this initiative on the White House.

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YALSA Technology for Young Adults

Online Doc Conference Planning Form ALA Annual 2011

by Karen Keys on Wed, Apr 7, 2010 at 10:48 am

Pecha Kucha: Teens and Technology: 

Pecha Kucha 20x20 is a simple presentation format where you show 20 images, each for 20 seconds. The images forward automatically and you talk along to the image. Each speaker takes 6-7 minutes.

This will allow for 10-12 people to speak about a variety of technology topics, with an opportunity for a Q&A or networking at the conclusion of the program.

This proposal was approved on 3/26/2010.

 

YALSA Technology for Young Adults

Online Doc Core Competencies in Technology for Librarians Serving Young Adults-draft

by Karen Keys on Wed, Apr 7, 2010 at 10:43 am

This is a draft in progress from the Technology for Young Adults Committee.

YALSA Technology for Young Adults

Online Doc ALA Annual 2010: Lights! Camera! Booktrailers!

by Karen Keys on Wed, Apr 7, 2010 at 10:19 am

Lights! Camera! Booktrailers!
This session, coordinated by the Technology for Young Adults
committee, will reveal best practices for creating and promoting
booktrailers and video to highlight collections,  programs, and
services for teens.

Saturday, June 26, from 4pm-5:30pm.
Location TBA

Speakers: Simone Elkeles, Buffy Hamilton, Joy Millam, Sonia A. Nash, Staci L. Terrell, Jennifer Wooten. Moderated by: Sarah Ludwig

Maine Library Association

Discussion Maine Library Association Conference 2010 Hard Times & Great Expectations

by Sonja Eyler on Wed, Apr 7, 2010 at 06:28 am

Have an idea for a great program at the Maine Library Association Conference, “Hard Times and Great Expectations” held at the Samoset Resort in Rockland, October 7-8, 2010?  Use the attached Program Proposal form to submit your idea!

Please fill out both sides and return by June 1, 2010 to Nissa Flanagan, Merrill Memorial Library, 215 Main Street, Yarmouth, ME 04096 or email her at nflanagan@maine.rr.com

Have an idea for a great program at the Maine Library Association Conference, “Hard Times and Great Expectations” held at the Samoset Resort in Rockland, October 7-8, 2010?  Use the attached Program Proposal form to submit your idea!

Please fill out both sides and return by June 1, 2010 to Nissa Flanagan, Merrill Memorial Library, 215 Main Street, Yarmouth, ME 04096 or email her at nflanagan@maine.rr.com

For the program proposal form, please go to:

http://mainelibraries.org/news/article.php?id=7

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Association for Rural and Small Libraries (ARSL)

Discussion ARSL Scholarship Information

by Sonja Eyler on Wed, Apr 7, 2010 at 06:26 am

ARSL Conference Scholarships

ARSL Conference Scholarships

The Association for Rural and Small Libraries currently offers three annual conference scholarships to promote the organization and the conference. They are the Dr. Bernard Vavrek Scholarship, the Founders Scholarship and the Ken Davenport Scholarship.

For conference scholarship information and an application, please see:

http://www.arsl.info/annual-conference-awards-calendar/award-scholarship-info/

 

 

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ACRL (Association of College and Research Libraries)

Online Doc Slides and Audio from "Pay-Per-View Options: Is Transactional Access Right For My Institution?" (ALCTS Electronic Resources Interest Group)

by Adam Burling (staff) on Tue, Jan 19, 2010 at 03:33 pm

(links to the audio file and PDF versions of the slides are at the end of this post)

The ALCTS CCS Electronic Resources Interest Group presented a panel discussion "Pay-Per-View Options: Is Transactional Access Right For My Institution?" on Saturday, July 11, 2009, from 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Presenters and participants shared their experiences and questions related to providing access to journal content without submitting their bottom lines to costly and sometimes little-used journal subscriptions.

The panel included:

(links to the audio file and PDF versions of the slides are at the end of this post)

The ALCTS CCS Electronic Resources Interest Group presented a panel discussion "Pay-Per-View Options: Is Transactional Access Right For My Institution?" on Saturday, July 11, 2009, from 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Presenters and participants shared their experiences and questions related to providing access to journal content without submitting their bottom lines to costly and sometimes little-used journal subscriptions.

The panel included:

Pay Per View – Where We Were, Where We Are and Where Are We Going Next?

Beth R. Bernhardt, Presenter
Jackson Library
University of North Carolina at Greensboro

ABSTRACT:

Between 2002 and 2003, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) set up several different types of pay-per-view options that provided users with over 3,500 unsubscribed titles.  A few years later the library set up access to many of these titles through Consortium Big Deals. This presentation will talk about what options the library experimented with, what is still there, compare its pay-per-view statistics with its big deals and discuss how libraries might use pay-per-view options in the coming years.

Developing a Pay-Per-View Model in a Financially Challenging Budget Year

Nicole Mitchell and Elizabeth Lorbeer, Presenters
Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences
University of Alabama at Birmingham

ABSTRACT:

Anticipated reductions at the University of Alabama, Birmingham, for fiscal year 2009/2010 will result in a content budget of roughly half what it was four years ago. The library went from having packages with almost every commercial and society publisher to just a few packages in 2009. Over 4,500 titles were cancelled for 2009, with only 52 journals being reinstated by user request. In exploring a solution for next fiscal year, the library began to investigate investing twenty percent of its journal budget to subsidized pay-per-view by setting up deposit accounts with the publishers, with a goal to significantly lower user fees for article access.  

Fast Food Nation/Google Generation/Financial Down Turn ... Meet the Library

Ryan Weir and Ashley Ireland, Presenters
Murray State University
Murray, Kentucky

ABSTRACT:

Murray State University recently initiated a project that will be the inaugural step in its transition to both providing optimized digital access and changing the landscape of its journal acquisitions from a model that has been traditionally print to one that is primarily electronic.  Alongside this transition, the library recently added a just-in-time element to its previous just-in-case-only model. The presentation also addressed the driving forces behind the library's decisions, its selection of Science Direct as a vendor, the implementation process, the outcomes, and where the library sees itself headed in the future.

Transactional Access: A Publisher's Take

Mark Rothenbuhler
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

ABSTRACT:

The final presentation offered the perspective of a major publisher about its experiences offering streamlined article access via prepaid tokens, including the realities and potential benefits of transactional access to journal articles to libraries and publishers, plus suggestions as to what libraries should be thinking about.   

Following the presentations, several participants asked questions and shared their own experiences.

Click here to listen to the entire panel presentation (1 hour, 12 minutes).

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ALCTS Electronic Resources Interest Group

Online Doc Slides and Audio from "Pay-Per-View Options: Is Transactional Access Right For My Institution?" (ALCTS Electronic Resources Interest Group)

by Adam Burling (staff) on Tue, Jan 19, 2010 at 03:33 pm

(links to the audio file and PDF versions of the slides are at the end of this post)

The ALCTS CCS Electronic Resources Interest Group presented a panel discussion "Pay-Per-View Options: Is Transactional Access Right For My Institution?" on Saturday, July 11, 2009, from 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Presenters and participants shared their experiences and questions related to providing access to journal content without submitting their bottom lines to costly and sometimes little-used journal subscriptions.

The panel included:

(links to the audio file and PDF versions of the slides are at the end of this post)

The ALCTS CCS Electronic Resources Interest Group presented a panel discussion "Pay-Per-View Options: Is Transactional Access Right For My Institution?" on Saturday, July 11, 2009, from 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Presenters and participants shared their experiences and questions related to providing access to journal content without submitting their bottom lines to costly and sometimes little-used journal subscriptions.

The panel included:

Pay Per View – Where We Were, Where We Are and Where Are We Going Next?

Beth R. Bernhardt, Presenter
Jackson Library
University of North Carolina at Greensboro

ABSTRACT:

Between 2002 and 2003, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) set up several different types of pay-per-view options that provided users with over 3,500 unsubscribed titles.  A few years later the library set up access to many of these titles through Consortium Big Deals. This presentation will talk about what options the library experimented with, what is still there, compare its pay-per-view statistics with its big deals and discuss how libraries might use pay-per-view options in the coming years.

Developing a Pay-Per-View Model in a Financially Challenging Budget Year

Nicole Mitchell and Elizabeth Lorbeer, Presenters
Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences
University of Alabama at Birmingham

ABSTRACT:

Anticipated reductions at the University of Alabama, Birmingham, for fiscal year 2009/2010 will result in a content budget of roughly half what it was four years ago. The library went from having packages with almost every commercial and society publisher to just a few packages in 2009. Over 4,500 titles were cancelled for 2009, with only 52 journals being reinstated by user request. In exploring a solution for next fiscal year, the library began to investigate investing twenty percent of its journal budget to subsidized pay-per-view by setting up deposit accounts with the publishers, with a goal to significantly lower user fees for article access.  

Fast Food Nation/Google Generation/Financial Down Turn ... Meet the Library

Ryan Weir and Ashley Ireland, Presenters
Murray State University
Murray, Kentucky

ABSTRACT:

Murray State University recently initiated a project that will be the inaugural step in its transition to both providing optimized digital access and changing the landscape of its journal acquisitions from a model that has been traditionally print to one that is primarily electronic.  Alongside this transition, the library recently added a just-in-time element to its previous just-in-case-only model. The presentation also addressed the driving forces behind the library's decisions, its selection of Science Direct as a vendor, the implementation process, the outcomes, and where the library sees itself headed in the future.

Transactional Access: A Publisher's Take

Mark Rothenbuhler
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

ABSTRACT:

The final presentation offered the perspective of a major publisher about its experiences offering streamlined article access via prepaid tokens, including the realities and potential benefits of transactional access to journal articles to libraries and publishers, plus suggestions as to what libraries should be thinking about.   

Following the presentations, several participants asked questions and shared their own experiences.

Click here to listen to the entire panel presentation (1 hour, 12 minutes).

More...

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