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YALSA Partnerships Advocating for Teens (Young Adult Library Services Association)

Online Doc Vikki Terrile - PAT Literature Review

by Amy Pelman on Fri, Apr 9, 2010 at 12:46 pm

Partnerships Advocating for Teens:  A Brief Literature Review

By Vikki Terrile

Partnerships Advocating for Teens:  A Brief Literature Review

By Vikki Terrile

A literature review looking on partnerships advocating for teens reveals that most of the documented research relates to social service agencies, schools and other community-based organizations working together to benefit young people.  Examples include colleges and universities collaborating with local public schools to provide everything from math and science programs[1] to mental health and social services to teens,[2] while at the same time developing valuable research.  Other research demonstrates how different types of service provider agencies (for example, substance abuse treatment agencies and mental health treatment agencies) working together often provide better services than when working alone, particularly with special populations, such as teens in detention,[3] or teens in foster care.[4]

Another subset of the literature on collaborations and partnerships focuses on involving youth in policy, research and practice that affects them.[5]  Relating young people’s status within the social structure to concepts of social exclusion and inclusion, this research looks at how children and teens can be included as stakeholders in collaborative efforts that relate to them.

From a practical standpoint, all of the academic research looks at partnerships in action, offering examples of what works and what does not when separate agencies come together on behalf of teens.  This focus on best practices provides young adult librarians and others working with teens a place to start, by facilitating creative thinking about with whom and where a library can partner to best serve its teens. 

Committees like YALSA’s Partnerships Advocating for Teens, TAGS (Teen Advisory Groups), Youth Participation, Outreach to Young Adults with Special Needs, and Joint School/Public Library Cooperation should consider working together to collect and disseminate research and best practices on collaborations from within young adult librarianship to add to the literature in a meaningful way.

 

References

Brown, E., Hawkins, J., Arthur, M., Briney, J., &  Abbott, R. (2007). Effects of communities that care on prevention services systems: Findings from the community youth development study at 1.5 Years. Prevention Science, 8(3), 180-191.

Fitzgerald, H. E., Abrams, A., Church, R. L., Votruba, J. C., & Imig, G. L. (1996). Applied developmental science at Michigan State University: Connecting university and community via programs for children, youth, and families. Journal of Research on Adolescence (Lawrence Erlbaum), 6(1), 55-69.

Happy birthday! ready to vote? (1998). Christian Science Monitor, 90(229), 7.

Harper, G. W., Bangi, A. K., Contreras, R., Pedraza, A., Tolliver, M., & Vess, L. (2004). Diverse phases of collaboration: Working together to improve community-based HIV interventions for adolescents. American Journal of Community Psychology, 33(3), 193-204.

Hill, M., Davis, J., Prout, A., & Tisdall, K. (2004). Moving the participation agenda forward. Children & Society, 18(2), 77-96. doi:10.1002/CHI.819

Jenson, J. M., & Potter, C. C. (2003). The effects of cross-system collaboration on mental health and substance abuse problems of detained youth. Research on Social Work Practice, 13(5), 588-607. doi:10.1177/1049731503253405

Kissinger, J. (2004). Teens and technology: Connecting the dots. Solid State Technology, 47(9), 78-77.

Knight, M. (2008). Making partnerships work for the benefit of youths. Corrections Today, 70(2), 58-63.

McHale, S. M., Crouter, A. C., Fennelly, K., Tomascik, C. A., Updegraff, K. A., Graham, J. E., Baker, A. E., Dreisbach, L., Ferry, N., Manlove, E. E., McGroder, S. M., Mulkeen, P., & Obeidallah, D. A. (1996). Community-based interventions for young adolescents: The Penn State PRIDE project. Journal of Research on Adolescence (Lawrence Erlbaum), 6(1), 23-36.

McHale, S. M., & Lerner, R. M. (1996). University-community collaborations on behalf of youth. Journal of Research on Adolescence (Lawrence Erlbaum), 6(1), 1-7.

Moore, A. O., & Keith Jr., A. R. (2004). National conversations spark municipal interest in youth transition to adulthood. Nation's Cities Weekly, 27(43), 4-4.

Ohio credits prevention efforts for reduction in youth drug use. (cover story). (2002). Alcoholism & Drug Abuse Weekly, 14(16), 1.

Rosenberg, L. (2008). Building a meaningful future for young people with mental illness. Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research, 35(4), 362-364. doi:10.1007/s11414-008-9143-1

Roth, J., & Hendrickson, J. M. (1991). Schools and youth organizations. Phi Delta Kappan, 72(8), 619.

Scannapieco, M., Connell-Carrick, K., & Painter, K. (2007). In their own words: Challenges facing youth aging out of foster care. Child & Adolescent Social Work Journal, 24(5), 423-435. doi:10.1007/s10560-007-0093-x

Singh, N. N., Williams, E., & Spears, N. (2002). To value and address diversity: From policy to practice. Journal of Child & Family Studies, 11(1), 35-45.

Stevens, J. W. (1999). Creating collaborative partnerships: Clinical intervention research in an inner-city middle school. Social Work in Education, 21(3), 151-162.

Weinberg, R. A., & Erickson, M. F. (1996). Minnesota's children, youth, and family consortium: A university-community collaboration. Journal of Research on Adolescence (Lawrence Erlbaum), 6(1), 37-53.

YALSA and FOLUSA announce collaboration. (1996). American Libraries,27(10), 6.

 

 


[1] Kissinger, 2004.

[2] Fitzgerald, et al., 1996; McHale, et al. 1996; McHale, at al. 1996(2).

[3] Jenson & Potter, 2003; Knight, 2008.

[4] Scannapieco, et al, 2007.

[5] Hill, et al, 2004.

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ALCTS CRS Access to Continuing Resources Interest Group

Discussion ALA 2010 Annual Panel Topic: Re-thinking library business model for licensed digital contents under mobile and cloud computing

by Lai-Ying Hsiung (non-member) on Thu, Apr 8, 2010 at 08:05 pm
The ALCTS CRS Access to Continuing Resources Interest Group invites you to attend:

Re-thinking library business model for licensed digital contents under mobile and cloud computing
Sunday, June 27, 2010, 4:00-5:30 p.m.
Washington, DC (TBA)

Exponential growth of mobile devices require libraries, vendors and
publishers to re-think how to enhance user experience with library
The ALCTS CRS Access to Continuing Resources Interest Group invites you to attend:

Re-thinking library business model for licensed digital contents under mobile and cloud computing
Sunday, June 27, 2010, 4:00-5:30 p.m.
Washington, DC (TBA)

Exponential growth of mobile devices require libraries, vendors and
publishers to re-think how to enhance user experience with library
licensed digital collections on the go. As Google Editions allows the
physical download of the digital into something tangible, challenging
our notion of "ownership", how are we going to rewrite business rules?
Come and hear our panelists' perspectives on this issue and possible
future trends.

Jonathan Morgan, Assistant Director of Web Strategy & Innovation, American Chemical Society.
Chris Palma, Strategic Partner Development Manager. Google.
Michael Porter, Communications Manager, WebJunction.

Please join us for a lively discussion!

For more information, please contact Lai-Ying Hsiung (chair,
lhsiung@ucsc.edu) or Heather Staines (vice-chair,
Heather.Staines@springer.com) of Access to Continuing Resources Interest Group.
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Librarians who Love Cats (& dogs & other pets)

Discussion Halla the Norwegian Forets cat

by James Rettig on Thu, Apr 8, 2010 at 02:32 pm

Cats rule--dogs drool!

If we put a cape on Halle the Norwegian Forest cat, she would be supercat and fly!

ALA Dance Party

cat dance party

by JP Porcaro on Thu, Apr 8, 2010 at 12:14 pm
ALCTS

Event ALCTS Web Course: Fundamentals of Electronic Resources Acquisitions

by Debra Spidal on Thu, Apr 8, 2010 at 11:03 am

FERA Session: April 19 - May 14, 2010

FERA Session: April 19 - May 14, 2010

The Fundamentals of Electronic Resources Acquisitions Web course will provide an overview of acquiring, providing access to, administering, supporting, and monitoring access to electronic resources. It will provide a basic background in electronic resource acquisitions including product trials, licensing, purchasing methods, and pricing models and will provide an overview of the sometimes complex relationships between vendors, publishers, platform providers, and libraries. The course was developed by Dalene Hawthorne, Head of Systems and Technical Services, Emporia State University.

Instructors: Elizabeth Winter and Susan Davis

Length of web course: 4 weeks

For additional details and registration information see:

http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/alcts/confevents/upcoming/webcourse/fera/index.cfm

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ALCTS New Members Interest Group

Event ANMIG Chat - Small ways to become involved

by Erica Findley on Thu, Apr 8, 2010 at 10:45 am

There are ways you can be more active without dedicating to an entire year of service and conference travel. ALCTS needs your help in other ways and  the ANMIG wants to tell you all about it.

Please join us for an informal 1 hour chat on Wednesday April 21st at 3 pm Pacific time. ANMIG team member Erica Findley will be your host. If you cannot make the chat don't worry. The transcript will be archived and available in Connect.

There are ways you can be more active without dedicating to an entire year of service and conference travel. ALCTS needs your help in other ways and  the ANMIG wants to tell you all about it.

Please join us for an informal 1 hour chat on Wednesday April 21st at 3 pm Pacific time. ANMIG team member Erica Findley will be your host. If you cannot make the chat don't worry. The transcript will be archived and available in Connect.

To join the chat:
On April 21st log in to Connect and navigate the the ANMIG page. Look in the right hand column for "Chats" click and then look for the Chat Room called "April 21st Involvement" and click to join.

See the Chat FAQ for detailed instructions http://connect.ala.org/node/85036

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Image Resources Interest Group (ACRL)

Discussion IRIG Member Survey, Dec 2009

by Joanna Burgess (non-member) on Wed, Apr 7, 2010 at 07:36 pm

In December, we surveyed IRIG members to learn more about our new community of practice. Twenty-eight people answered the survey, and the feedback is now informing our current planning, thanks!

ALA COL Copyright (Ad hoc Subcommittee)

Discussion Visual Artists suing Google

by Eric Harbeson (non-member) on Wed, Apr 7, 2010 at 05:46 pm

Just in case there are folks who haven't seen this yet:

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/07/technology/07google.html

"...On Wednesday, the American Society of Media Photographers and other groups representing visual artists plan to file a class-action lawsuit against Google, asserting that the company’s efforts to digitize millions of books from libraries amount to large-scale infringement of their copyrights...."

ALCTS

Event ALCTS Web Course: Fundamentals of Preservation

by Debra Spidal on Wed, Apr 7, 2010 at 03:51 pm

FOP Session: May 10–June 4, 2010

The Fundamentals of Preservation (FOP) web course is an introduction to the principles, policies and practices of preservation in libraries and archives. It is designed to inform all staff, across divisions and departments and at all levels of responsibility. Provides tools to begin extending the useful life of library collections.

Course components:

FOP Session: May 10–June 4, 2010

The Fundamentals of Preservation (FOP) web course is an introduction to the principles, policies and practices of preservation in libraries and archives. It is designed to inform all staff, across divisions and departments and at all levels of responsibility. Provides tools to begin extending the useful life of library collections.

Course components:

  • Preservation as a formal library function, and how it reflects and supports the institutional mission
  • The primary role of preventive care, including good storage conditions, emergency planning, and careful handling of collections
  • The history and manufacture of physical formats and how this impacts on preservation options
  • Standard methods of care and repair, as well as reformatting options
  • Challenges in preserving digital content and what the implications are for the future of scholarship

Format:

A Moodle-developed site is composed of self-paced modules with facilitated interaction led by the instructors. There are predetermined start and end dates and a suggested pace which includes interaction with the instructors and your classmates. Students regularly use the forum and chat room functions to facilitate their class participation. Section quizzes are offered and feedback given, however, there is no final class grade.

Contact Hours: 8 hours

This four-week course will be offered from 2 to 3 times this year.  Each session is limited to 20 people.

Course Developers and Instructors

  • Karen E. K. Brown, Preservation Librarian, State University of New York - Albany
  • Jacob Nadal, Preservation Officer, UCLA Library

Registration

To register, complete the online registration form for the session you would like to attend.

For questions about registration, contact Tom Ferren, ALA Senior Registration Coordinator at (312) 280-4293 or 1-800-545-2433, ext. 4293; or email at tferren@ala.org.

Fees

$109 ALCTS Members; $129 Non-Members

LSSC:

This course is part of a three-part Collection Management elective course approved by the Library Support Staff Certification program.

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ALCTS Continuing Education Committee (Association for Library Collections and Technical Services)

Event ALCTS Web Course: Fundamentals of Preservation

by Debra Spidal on Wed, Apr 7, 2010 at 03:49 pm

FOP Session: May 10–June 4, 2010

The Fundamentals of Preservation (FOP) web course is an introduction to the principles, policies and practices of preservation in libraries and archives. It is designed to inform all staff, across divisions and departments and at all levels of responsibility. Provides tools to begin extending the useful life of library collections.

Course components:

FOP Session: May 10–June 4, 2010

The Fundamentals of Preservation (FOP) web course is an introduction to the principles, policies and practices of preservation in libraries and archives. It is designed to inform all staff, across divisions and departments and at all levels of responsibility. Provides tools to begin extending the useful life of library collections.

Course components:

  • Preservation as a formal library function, and how it reflects and supports the institutional mission
  • The primary role of preventive care, including good storage conditions, emergency planning, and careful handling of collections
  • The history and manufacture of physical formats and how this impacts on preservation options
  • Standard methods of care and repair, as well as reformatting options
  • Challenges in preserving digital content and what the implications are for the future of scholarship

Format:

A Moodle-developed site is composed of self-paced modules with facilitated interaction led by the instructors. There are predetermined start and end dates and a suggested pace which includes interaction with the instructors and your classmates. Students regularly use the forum and chat room functions to facilitate their class participation. Section quizzes are offered and feedback given, however, there is no final class grade.

Contact Hours: 8 hours

This four-week course will be offered from 2 to 3 times this year.  Each session is limited to 20 people.

Course Developers and Instructors

  • Karen E. K. Brown, Preservation Librarian, State University of New York - Albany
  • Jacob Nadal, Preservation Officer, UCLA Library

Registration

To register, complete the online registration form for the session you would like to attend.

For questions about registration, contact Tom Ferren, ALA Senior Registration Coordinator at (312) 280-4293 or 1-800-545-2433, ext. 4293; or email at tferren@ala.org.

Fees

$109 ALCTS Members; $129 Non-Members

LSSC:

This course is part of a three-part Collection Management elective course approved by the Library Support Staff Certification program.

More...

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