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Seven Measures of Success & ALA

Discussion Recommendation 2: Dialogue and Engagement -- Strategies

by Mary Ghikas on Mon, Apr 20, 2009 at 06:43 pm

The Fall 2008 Joint Meeting of the ALA Executive Board and the Executive Committees of ALA's 11 Divisions resulted in a lengthy list of possible strategies for improvement.  Following the Fall Board meeting, a consolidated list of possible strategies was sent to all participants in the Fall 2008 meeting and participants were asked to select the strategies most likely to result in improvement.

Discussion of the survey results and next step is ongoing.  Please join in!

Documents attached:

Update to the Working Group

Strategy List - with Survey Results

The Fall 2008 Joint Meeting of the ALA Executive Board and the Executive Committees of ALA's 11 Divisions resulted in a lengthy list of possible strategies for improvement.  Following the Fall Board meeting, a consolidated list of possible strategies was sent to all participants in the Fall 2008 meeting and participants were asked to select the strategies most likely to result in improvement.

Discussion of the survey results and next step is ongoing.  Please join in!

Documents attached:

Update to the Working Group

Strategy List - with Survey Results

Strategies for Dialogue and Engagement -- Ranked

 

 

 

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Seven Measures of Success & ALA

Discussion Recommendation 2: Dialogue and Engagement

by Mary Ghikas on Mon, Apr 20, 2009 at 06:35 pm

Becoming more "data-driven" was the highest priority arising from the Fall 2007 Joint Boards meeting (see Recommendation 1: Data Dashboard).  Examining the record of that meeting, the Seven Measures Working Group determined that the next priority was improving dialogue and engagement across a complex and diverse association.  While the Fall 2007 meeting underscored the importance of dialogue and engagement, it did not provide a clear pathway to improvement.  The Working Group recommended that the Fall 2008 Joint Boards meeting be focused on developing actionable recommendations to improve d

Becoming more "data-driven" was the highest priority arising from the Fall 2007 Joint Boards meeting (see Recommendation 1: Data Dashboard).  Examining the record of that meeting, the Seven Measures Working Group determined that the next priority was improving dialogue and engagement across a complex and diverse association.  While the Fall 2007 meeting underscored the importance of dialogue and engagement, it did not provide a clear pathway to improvement.  The Working Group recommended that the Fall 2008 Joint Boards meeting be focused on developing actionable recommendations to improve dialogue and engagement.

Document attached: 

Seven Measures Update #2, June 23, 2008

 

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Seven Measures of Success & ALA

Discussion Recommendation 1: Data Dashboard proposal

by Mary Ghikas on Mon, Apr 20, 2009 at 06:25 pm

In Fall 2007, the joint meeting of the ALA Executive Board and the Executive Committees of the 11 ALA Divisions held their initial discussion of 7 Measures of Success.  Based on that meeting, the Seven Measures Working Group, composed of one member from each of the 12 Boards, recommended that ALA begin development of a "data dashboard" to support decision-making by both member of ALA and staff.  Subsequent discussions were held with representatives of ALA Divisions and Round Tables (Midwinter 2009) and with ALA staff. 

Document attached:

In Fall 2007, the joint meeting of the ALA Executive Board and the Executive Committees of the 11 ALA Divisions held their initial discussion of 7 Measures of Success.  Based on that meeting, the Seven Measures Working Group, composed of one member from each of the 12 Boards, recommended that ALA begin development of a "data dashboard" to support decision-making by both member of ALA and staff.  Subsequent discussions were held with representatives of ALA Divisions and Round Tables (Midwinter 2009) and with ALA staff. 

Document attached:

Report of the Seven Measures Working Group, March 17, 2008

 

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ALSC Bloggers

Online Doc ALSC Blog Policy

by Jenny Najduch (staff) on Thu, Apr 9, 2009 at 03:30 pm
Union Library Workers

Discussion Archie Green Laborlorist and Librarian has Died

by Kathleen McCook on Fri, Apr 17, 2009 at 04:47 pm

Julie Ardery writes in Daily Yonder.

Archie Green who taught us "laborlore" and persuaded Congress to establish a national folklife center has died. 

Julie Ardery writes in Daily Yonder.

Archie Green who taught us "laborlore" and persuaded Congress to establish a national folklife center has died. 

Archie studied library science at University of Illinois (training that shows throughout his immense, impeccable archives, now at the University of North Carolina). At University of Pennsylvania, he earned a folklore degree, writing the dissertation that would become Only a Miner.

He lobbied hard and successfully for the creation of the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress.In 2007, the Library honored him as a “Living Legend.”

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Government Information Interest Group

Discussion Gov Info Facebook Groups!

by Rebecca Troy-Horton on Fri, Apr 17, 2009 at 12:01 pm

Thought you might want to check out these Facebook groups/fan pages about Gov Info!

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Cataloging Rules

Discussion Excellent article by Ingrid Hsieh-Yee.

by Jeffrey Beall (non-member) on Fri, Apr 17, 2009 at 08:57 am

AUTHOR: Ingrid Hsieh-Yee

TITLE: Educating Cataloging Professionals in a Changing Information Environment

AUTHOR: Ingrid Hsieh-Yee

TITLE: Educating Cataloging Professionals in a Changing Information Environment

SOURCE: Journal of Education for Library and Information Science vol. 49 no. 2 p. 93-106. Spring, 2008.

 

This article is worth a read, especially the first part. Though the article is mostly about training and education catalogers, the beginning provides a compelling description of the current state of information retrieval today. It looks at cataloging in the context of the big Internet search engines. I will paste in below several paragraphs from the first page of the article.

 CHALLENGES FROM WITHOUT
    The information environment has changed dramatically since Google came on the scene in 1997. The seeming simplicity of Google Search and its rapid retrieval of information make it an ideal tool for users who are not interested in sophisticated searches and are willing to accept information resources that are "good enough" (i.e., not necessarily the best) for their needs. Google's Book Project and Google Scholar, both launched in 2004, have expanded the scope and types of resources covered by Google. It is therefore not surprising that the general public and information seekers in colleges and universities rely heavily on search engines like Google these days.(3) The same studies also report that while users have deep trust in the quality of the information recommended by libraries, online catalogs are not the first information tools consulted by users when they have information needs.(4)
    To compete with search engines like Google, database creators and OPAC vendors have experimented with new features. EBSCO has indexed a large number of full-text articles in its databases and offered subject categories and format options to help users narrow down search results to more manageable sizes (see Academic Search Premier for examples). Many OPAC systems have added the capability of federated searching to bridge online catalogs and databases and enable users to have easier access to subscribed databases (see, for example, Ex Libris MetaLib). North Carolina State University has collaborated with Endeca to make use of facets such as LC classification numbers, subject headings, formats, library locations and has applied the Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records (FRBR) framework to bring together authors, geographic names, and years to help searchers zero in on materials of interest. More and more OPAC vendors are offering the capability to FRBRize bibliographic records to bring together related resources for users.(5) Ex Libris has presented Primo as the new solution to address users' need for a one-stop searching tool that supports searching all types of resources across online catalogs, digital objects, databases, and more.(6)
    Taking to heart users' strong interest in social bookmarking services, libraries have actively incorporated folksonomies into online catalogs to enable users to organize their personal information spaces and make use of shared tags. PennTags allows users to tag items of interest and share tags with people with common interests.(7) Spiteri reports that public library catalogs also allow users to tag materials for user-specific folders and let them decide whether to share their tags publicly.(8) Along the same line, Wenzler encourages and demonstrates the integration of tags created by users of LibraryThing into library catalogs to add "collective intelligence" to online catalogs.(9) The Library of Congress has placed many of its public-domain images on Flickr to harvest background information on those images from users.(10) The possibility of enriching metadata records with user-created tags and supporting users to share tags and build communities around resources of interest has generated much excitement among library professionals. Nevertheless, the weaknesses of folksonomies, such as ambiguity, synonymy, homographs, and basic variation, and their implications for retrieval are documented and should not be underestimated.(11)
    To improve cataloging efficiency and repurpose existing metadata to organize information for access, OCLC has launched a pilot project, "Next Generation Cataloging," with the intent to harvest upstream metadata from publishers, using ONIX, to generate bibliographic records for OPACs.(12)
    The ways people seek and use information have changed in the networked environment, and innovative approaches and techniques like the one described above are being implemented quickly to make resource discovery easier on users. The challenge for the cataloging community is figure out what roles we can we play in this competitive information arena.
 

 

 

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Games and Gaming

Event AASL Preconference: The Games Libraries Play (And How They Align Them)

by Beth Gallaway on Thu, Apr 16, 2009 at 10:09 pm

Presenters Christopher Harris, Brian Mayer and Kelly Czarnecki will demonstrate how to incorporate problem solving and content-area learning in K-12 classes by using modern board games, video games and virtual worlds.

Presenters Christopher Harris, Brian Mayer and Kelly Czarnecki will demonstrate how to incorporate problem solving and content-area learning in K-12 classes by using modern board games, video games and virtual worlds.

Speakers: Christopher Harris, Coordinator, School Library System for Genesee Valley BOCES; Brian Mayer, Library Technology Specialist, School Library System of Genesee Valley BOCES
Tickets: Advance: $179, AASL Member; $219 ALA Member; $269 Nonmember; $179 Student/Retired Member. Onsite: $189 AASL Member; $229 ALA Member; $279 Non-Member; $189 Student/Retired Member. Event Code: AA2

http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/aasl/conferencesandevents/national/charlotte2009.cfm

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ALA Connect Help

Discussion Is My Group's Content in ALA Connect Secure?

by Jenny Levine (staff) on Thu, Apr 16, 2009 at 03:11 pm

Yes, your group's content is secure and protected!

By default, content posted to any group, regardless of type (committee, task force, community, etc.), is viewable only by the people in the group. For every piece of content added to the site (a post, poll, online doc, calendar event, etc.), there is an option towards the obttom of the screen called "Audience." By default, that box is unchecked, which means only the group's members will see it. You have to manually check that "public" box to make the item viewable by anyone else.

Yes, your group's content is secure and protected!

By default, content posted to any group, regardless of type (committee, task force, community, etc.), is viewable only by the people in the group. For every piece of content added to the site (a post, poll, online doc, calendar event, etc.), there is an option towards the obttom of the screen called "Audience." By default, that box is unchecked, which means only the group's members will see it. You have to manually check that "public" box to make the item viewable by anyone else.

This allows an awards jury, board, nominating committee, or other group to work together in private but then publish results publicly. Again, though, someone in the group would manually have to check the "public" box to make the item accessible beyond the group's members.

In addition, your protected content cannot be found in search results by people who don't have access to it, and it will not appear on the home page for anyone who is not part of the group.

When ALA Connect first launched, the ACRL Board of Directors used the "polls/votes" feature to take virtual votes in its group. If you browse or search ALA Connect for ACRL Board votes, you won't be able to find them unless you're an ACRL Board member. Go ahead and give it a try. You'll find the public post with the results of one of the votes, but you won't find the votes themselves because they were never marked "public."

Please note, though, that if you want others outside of your group to see a specific post/document/discussion/etc., link to it, and/or comment on it, be sure to check that "public" box. We also encourage your group to make its meeting notices public in order to adhere to ALA's open meetings policy.

If you have further questions about security in ALA Connect, please don't hesitate to contact us.

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Games and Gaming

Discussion Link: Lessons at a Video Game Convention

by Aaron Dobbs on Thu, Apr 16, 2009 at 02:34 pm

Inside Higher Ed article:

Lessons at a Video Game Convention

Inside Higher Ed article:

Lessons at a Video Game Convention

"In general, our classrooms are filled with discussions related to the economy and global business challenges. It's not only a good time to review our business models but to rethink the actual role of business in society and how we teach. We teach business from traditional models developed, for the most part, many, many decades ago. Is this really the best we can do? Are games possibly teaching the things we don't, won't or can't?"

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