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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Conversation Starters

Suggestion Feast or Famine: STEAM @ the Library

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:05 am

Feast or Famine: STEAM @ the Library

Speakers:

Feast or Famine: STEAM @ the Library

Speakers:

  • Reilly Brower, Teacher, Technical and programming librarians, Dorr Township Library
  • Alexis Adrianse, Marketing and Advertising specialist, Dorr Township Library
  • Elyshia Schafer, MLIS, Teen Librarian, Dorr Township Library

Description:
Join our merry group group of STEAM project lovers while we tell you about our programming during great budget year and ... well, not so great budget years! We'll talk about programs that are cost effective as well as some of the ways we've found grant money and donations to continue our programming for all ages. We'll talk about where we got our ideas, how our programs were received and program FAILS :)

Library Types:
Public, Rural

Subject Headings:
Adult Services, Children’s Services, Community Engagement, Continuing Education, Public Services, Rural and Small Libraries, Youth Services

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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Conversation Starters

Suggestion Fantastic Maps and Where to Find Them

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:05 am

Fantastic Maps and Where to Find Them

Speaker:

  • Dory Klein, Education and Outreach Coordinator, Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the Boston Public Library

Description:
The Norman B. Leventhal Map Center (LMC) provides stewardship to the Boston Public Library’s collection of 200,000 maps and 5,000 atlases ranging in date from 1482 to the present. Central to its mission, the LMC strives to spark curiosity about geography, history, and the world.

Fantastic Maps and Where to Find Them

Speaker:

  • Dory Klein, Education and Outreach Coordinator, Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the Boston Public Library

Description:
The Norman B. Leventhal Map Center (LMC) provides stewardship to the Boston Public Library’s collection of 200,000 maps and 5,000 atlases ranging in date from 1482 to the present. Central to its mission, the LMC strives to spark curiosity about geography, history, and the world.

With funding and support from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS), the LMC is pleased to announce the launch of their newly revamped digital collections that are intended to increase access, discovery, and use of their collections and those of partner institutions through education and engagement. This extension and redesign of the LMC’s existing digital repository allows users to search collections with a familiar textual search interface, as well as a spatial search option taking advantage of bounding box coordinates for maps with misleading titles or spatial footprints. Resulting digital maps are then accompanied by curatorial content and links directing users to additional contextual information. Users are able to georeference the maps and layer them with digital annotations for their own personal research or interest, and export or them for use in more advanced geospatial technology through a download or Web Map Service (WMS). Additionally, this project provides a means for educators who are interested in creating sets of maps and customized content for use in their classroom, or by adapting sets created by other educators.

LMC’s new digital collections utilize several existing geospatial and open-source developments to enhance digital discoverability and use, (ex. GeoBlacklight for spatial indexing, MapWarper for volunteered geographic information), as well as new code development created for educator’s map sets. The resulting open-source code base combining these projects will be freely available so that it can be adapted and used further by other organizations.

Library Types:
Museum, Nonprofit, Public, Research Library, Special

Subject Headings:
Digitial Libraries, Electronic Resources, Geospatial Data and Services, Special Collections, Technology, Training, Transforming Libraries, Virtual Communities and Libraries

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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Conversation Starters

Suggestion Fake News is not the Problem: Addressing Issues with Information Consumption in a Digital Environment

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:05 am

Fake News is not the Problem: Addressing Issues with Information Consumption in a Digital Environment

Speaker:

Fake News is not the Problem: Addressing Issues with Information Consumption in a Digital Environment

Speaker:

  • Brandy Rene'. Horne, MLIS, Instruction/Reference Librarian, University of South Carolina Aiken

Description:
Since the last presidential election, fake news has become a topic of much discussion, and Librarians, seeing an opportunity to share their information literacy expertise, have been eagerly creating and sharing articles about and guides for spotting fake news. So many have been created that lists of these resources are now beginning to circulate, such as this one from the ALA Public Programs Office: http://www.programminglibrarian.org/articles/fake-news-library-round
While these are all good resources with good information, they are being deployed as a solution to fake news, but fake news is not the real problem. It is often said that the best thing about the Internet is that it gives everyone a voice, and the worst part about the Internet is that it gives everyone a voice. It gives rise to communities, but also to factions. The current social and political landscape is one of tremendous polarization, and while the Internet has played a significant role in that polarization, it is not entirely to blame. Studies have shown that many people are not necessarily interested in factual information. Instead, they search for information that confirms their feelings and beliefs. No amount of instruction in how to spot fake news will change the motivations behind their information consumption. Instead, good information-seeking behavior needs to be taught early, in K-12. Librarians must not just focus on what constitutes good information vs. bad. They must also address why people search for information and why and how they decide what to consume.
Finally, the term fake news is problematic partly because it’s now being used to refer to anything a person or entity finds objectionable, and it has generally been applied so broadly that it is now essentially meaningless. Satire sites such as The Onion and Borowitz Report are technically fake news, but unlike intentional disinformation and propaganda, they do not seek to mislead people. It is important for librarians to identify specific areas that are problematic, then label and address them accordingly.

Library Types:
Academic, Community College, Elementary School, High School, Information-related Organization, Library School, Middle School, Public, Rural, School/Media Center, Student, Undergraduate

Subject Headings:
Adult Services, Children’s Services, Continuing Education, Ethics, Information Literacy, Instruction, Intellectual Freedom, Knowledge Management, Librarianship, Reference Services, Rural and Small Libraries, Social Change, Social Media & Networks, Virtual Communities and Libraries, Young Adult Services, Youth Services

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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Conversation Starters

Suggestion Fake news is not always easy to spot and is even harder to define: How the checkology® virtual classroom can teach essential news literacy skills

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:05 am

Fake news is not always easy to spot and is even harder to define: How the checkology® virtual classroom can teach essential news literacy skills

Speakers:

Fake news is not always easy to spot and is even harder to define: How the checkology® virtual classroom can teach essential news literacy skills

Speakers:

  • John Silva, NBCT, Virtual Classroom Coordinator, The News Literacy Project
  • Peter Adams

Description:
In today’s digital age, information (and misinformation) can be created, published, shared and commented on with just a single click — so the development of news literacy skills is essential for meaningful civic engagement. While exploring the News Literacy Project’s checkology® virtual classroom, which provides students with authentic, innovative and timely blended learning experiences, participants will share anecdotes about (and strategies for) confronting misinformation in the classroom, along with ways that such examples can be used as opportunities for authentic news literacy and civic learning. They will interact with specific modules, exploring how the checkology® learning activities use real-world examples to engage students, either as a class or 1:1, and encourages meaningful discussion about what is fact, what is fiction and how to tell the difference. Our discussion panel will include librarians from partner institutions who will explore the strategies, technologies and resources they are using to help young people become news- and information-literate.

Library Types:
Academic, Community College, Elementary School, High School, Nonprofit, Prison Library, Public, Regional System, Rural, School/Media Center, Student

Subject Headings:
Information Literacy, Literacy, Social Media & Networks, Technology

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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Conversation Starters

Suggestion Facilitating Communication, Collaboration, and Continuing Education for Library Directors

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:04 am

Facilitating Communication, Collaboration, and Continuing Education for Library Directors

Speaker:

Facilitating Communication, Collaboration, and Continuing Education for Library Directors

Speaker:

  • Alex Lent, Director, Millis Public Library; Massachusetts Library Association; Library Directors Group

Description:
In an Ignite session at ALA Mid Winter in Boston in 2016, Alex Lent launched the Library Directors Group in order to facilitate communication, collaboration, and continuing education for library directors, especially for those who (like Alex) were in their first five years on the job.

A little over a year later, the Library Directors Group has over 300 members across the United States and Canada and is beginning to spread abroad. Members seek and share advice on topics including budget, facilities, and personnel management, job hunting, community relations, and much more. The group has launched a series of articles titled "What I Wish All Library Directors Knew About BLANK" where topical experts give library directors introductions to critical topics, such as patron privacy, the value of paraprofessional staff, and activism.

The proposed conversation starter is a venue for library directors to share experiences and build connections, and to discuss how we can work together to learn and grow as directors and improve our libraries and the communities they serve.

Attendees will come away energized and with a network of peers they can learn with and rely upon as they work to grow and succeed as library directors.

Library Types:
Academic, Association, Community College, Consortium, Federal, Government, Information-related Organization, Library School, Regional System, Research Library, Rural, Seeking Employment, State Library, Student

Subject Headings:
Administration and Management, Advocacy, Budget Planning and Finance, Buildings and Facilities, Career Advice, Continuing Education, Funding, Fundraising, Human Resources, Leadership, Librarianship, Mentoring, Networking, New ALA Members, Organizational Change, Partnerships, Personnel and Staffing, Recruitment, Resource Sharing, Rural and Small Libraries, Social Media & Networks, Strategic Planning, Training, Transforming Libraries, Trustees

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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Conversation Starters

Suggestion Cultural Humility: An alternative to cultural competencies in libraries

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:04 am

Cultural Humility: An alternative to cultural competencies in libraries

Speakers:

  • David A. Hurley, Discovery & Web Librarian, University of New Mexico
  • Sarah Kostelecky
  • Lori Townsend

Description:
How can libraries improve services to our diverse communities? Traditionally, libraries have used cultural competence workshops and trainings as a way to help employees better serve populations outside their comfort zones. However, cultural humility may offer a better model.

Cultural Humility: An alternative to cultural competencies in libraries

Speakers:

  • David A. Hurley, Discovery & Web Librarian, University of New Mexico
  • Sarah Kostelecky
  • Lori Townsend

Description:
How can libraries improve services to our diverse communities? Traditionally, libraries have used cultural competence workshops and trainings as a way to help employees better serve populations outside their comfort zones. However, cultural humility may offer a better model.

As Tervalon & Murray-García (1998) argue, a pitfall of cultural competence is the traditional notion of ‘competence’ as an endpoint: mastery of knowledge that can be assessed through quantitative measures. In fact, cultural competence programs often include lists of characteristics of various cultures, suggesting that successful interactions with people from those cultures is a matter of mastering the correct formula: Interacting with a German? Be direct, and on time. With a Native American? Avoid eye-contact and expect long silences.

This approach may cause us to overlook the individuals involved in an interaction and the context in which it occurs -- treating ‘culture’ as something innate and undifferentiated. It is also of limited use in library contexts where typically far more identities are represented than can be ‘mastered’ and any individual’s background cannot be assumed.

In this conversation starter, we will look at the concept of cultural humility and the promise it holds for libraries, as well as its limitations. Cultural humility is a practice of self-reflection on how one’s own background and expectations impact a situation, of openness to others’ determining the relevance of their own identities to any given situation, and of committing to redress the effects of power imbalances.

Library Types:
Academic, Community College, Elementary School, High School, Library School, Middle School, Public, Research Library, Tribal, Undergraduate

Subject Headings:
Administration and Management, Community Engagement, Diversity, Equity of Access, Multicultural Services, Organizational Change, Personnel and Staffing

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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Conversation Starters

Suggestion Cuentos Latinos: Instituting Change in Classrooms and Community with Bilingual Children’s Books

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:03 am

Cuentos Latinos: Instituting Change in Classrooms and Community with Bilingual Children’s Books

Speakers:

Cuentos Latinos: Instituting Change in Classrooms and Community with Bilingual Children’s Books

Speakers:

  • Raquel Ortiz, Author, Center for Puerto Rican Studies, Hunter College
  • Marvin Garcia, Coordinator, Humboldt Park Community as a Campus
  • Amy Costales, Instructor, University of Oregon
  • Marina Tristan, Assistant Director, Arte Público Press

Description:
Educators and children’s book authors Amy Costales and Dr. Raquel M. Ortiz, along with educator and community activist Marvin García, bring their knowledge and expertise in creating teaching materials, curriculum, and multimedia materials to a discussion about how to use bilingual literature in the classroom, libraries, and communities.

The presenters are:

AMY COSTALES is an instructor and advisor in the University of Oregon’s Spanish Heritage Language (SHL) program. The SHL team developed 14 Spanish courses across the curriculum in five years and was awarded the University of Oregon Equity Innovation Award for “transforming, reorganizing and streamlining the experience of the growing numbers of Latino students who pursue studies of Spanish.” A teacher for more than 20 years, she is the author of numerous bilingual picture books, including LUPE VARGAS AND HER SUPER BEST FRIEND / LUPE VARGAS Y SU SUPER MEJOR AMIGA (Luna Rising, 2006), a Junior Library Guild Selection; ABUELITA FULL OF LIFE / ABUELITA LLENA DE VIDA (Luna Rising, 2007), an Américas Award Commended Title and a Tejas Star Book Award Finalist; HELLO NIGHT / HOLA NOCHE (Luna Rising, 2007); SUNDAYS ON FOURTH STREET / DOMINGOS EN LA CALLE CUATRO (Piñata Books, 2009); and ABUELO VIVÍA SOLO / GRANDPA USED TO LIVE ALONE (Piñata Books, 2010), a Tejas Star Book Award Finalist.

MARVIN GARCÍA is the Humboldt Park Community as a Campus (CAAC) coordinator. He coordinates the three education institutes that support administrators, teachers, parents, and youth at the 16 schools that participate in the initiative. He is the former director of the Alternative Schools Network of Chicago Praxis Project and for 17 years served as director of the Dr. Pedro Albizu Campos High School. Currently Marvin serves on the Northeastern Illinois University Board of Trustees, the University Civil Service Merit Board, the National Latino Education Research and Policy Board and chairs the Dr. Albizu Campos High School Board. Marvin is a Chicago Community Trust “Community Service Fellow” and holds an MA in Adult Education from National-Louis University and an MA in Educational Leadership from Northeastern Illinois University.

RAQUEL M. ORTIZ creates curriculum and educational materials for the Center for Puerto Rican Studies’ Cultural Ambassador Program at Hunter College in New York City. As an editor and writer for Santillana, she has created textbooks and educational material for children in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Her picture book, SOFI AND THE MAGIC, MUSICAL MURAL / SOFI Y EL MÁGICO MURAL MUSICAL (Piñata Books, 2015), was named to the 2016 Tejas Star Reading List. She is the author/illustrator of PLANTING FLAGS ON DIVISION STREET (Colores Editorial House, 2016), and her new picture book, SOFI’S SPECIAL SONG / LA CANCIÓN ESPECIAL DE SOFI, will be published by Piñata Books in 2019.

Presentations:

Ms. Costales’ presentation will address the development of the University of Oregon’s Spanish Heritage Language program and its validation of U.S. Latino experience and U.S. Spanish. Students engage with local bilingual schools, libraries, migrant education programs, and local Latino youth programs in an effort to bridge the gap between campus and community and to promote leadership skills. Additionally, because self-representation for students is a key component of the program, they create short stories, poetry, art, and digital storytelling. The students actively tell their own stories and become participatory members in the production of the representation of Latinos. She will share information on the role of Latino literature, including picture books, in the curriculum; student storytelling projects; and community engagement.

Mr. García’s presentation will chronicle the development of a community-driven initiative, Community as a Campus (CAAC), which strengthens neighborhood schools by linking them to community resources such as libraries and institutional partners. The Humboldt Park Community as a Campus Plan (CAAC) is a comprehensive education initiative adopted by the Community Action Council of Humboldt Park and endorsed by Chicago Public Schools. Over the past four years, this initiative has supported school leaders and improved student outcome and parent participation through the three education institutes that anchors CAAC’s work: the Parent Popular Institute, the Youth Leadership Institute, and the Teacher/Administrator Institute.

Dr. Ortiz’s presentation will provide general information about the Cultural Ambassador Program. She will share the CA materials (study and parent guides, along with short instructional films) created for her book, SOFI AND THE MAGIC MUSICAL MURAL / SOFI Y EL MÁGICO MURAL MUSICAL, which facilitate teaching Latino bilingual children’s literature. She will also show a brief excerpt from The Pioneers/Pioneros Documentary Series, PURA BELPRÉ STORYTELLER, that includes a snippet of Pura Belpré’s animated folktale, CUCARACHITA MARTINA Y RATONCITO PÉREZ.

Library Types:
Academic, Elementary School, Library School, Public, Student

Subject Headings:
Children’s Literature, Community Engagement, Diversity, Electronic Resources, Equity of Access, Multicultural Services, Social Change

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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Conversation Starters

Suggestion Counter Islamophobia Through Stories

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:03 am

Counter Islamophobia Through Stories

Speakers:

  • Gauri Manglik, CEO, Kitaabworld.com, LLC
  • Sadaf Siddique

Description:
I am one of the founders of KitaabWorld, an online bookstore focused on South Asian and diverse children's literature in the US. The word "kitaab" means "book" in many non-western languages and hence the name.

Counter Islamophobia Through Stories

Speakers:

  • Gauri Manglik, CEO, Kitaabworld.com, LLC
  • Sadaf Siddique

Description:
I am one of the founders of KitaabWorld, an online bookstore focused on South Asian and diverse children's literature in the US. The word "kitaab" means "book" in many non-western languages and hence the name.

We launched our “Countering Islamophobia Through Stories” campaign in January 2017, where we provide a framework for parents, teachers and librarians to provide a positive representation of Muslims for children. More details are available on https://kitaabworld.com/pages/counter-islamophobia-through-stories

Through our campaign, we facilitated discovery of a curated set of books around different themes - (1) Muslim Kids as Heroes, (2) Inspiring Muslim Leaders, (3) Celebrating Islam and (4) Folktales from Islamic Traditions - so parents, teachers and librarians have different access points to discuss ideas and expand horizons for their children. We strongly believe this exposure is necessary early on as research indicates kids ages 3-8 are most open and receptive to new ideas.

Our campaign has been very well received by the community, and many teachers, parents and librarians have told us how helpful they have found the curated book lists. We've also taken this campaign offline and conducted Parent-ED and collaborated with schools and teachers for fun workshops to expand the curriculum to include some of these topics. We would be very thankful for an opportunity to present this to school librarians and expand the reach of our idea to children all over the US.

Library Types:
Academic, Elementary School, High School, Middle School, Public, School/Media Center, Student

Subject Headings:
Acquisitions, Children’s Literature, Children’s Services, Collection Development, Community Engagement, Diversity, Multicultural Services, Young Adult Services

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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Conversation Starters

Suggestion Connecting People and Environment: York University Libraries Costa Rican Library, La Casita Azul

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:03 am

Connecting People and Environment: York University Libraries Costa Rican Library, La Casita Azul

Speakers:

Connecting People and Environment: York University Libraries Costa Rican Library, La Casita Azul

Speakers:

  • Dana Craig
  • Tom Scott, Associate University Librarian, information Services, York University

Description:
The fundamental concept behind La Casita Azul (winner of the OCULA Special Award) is to develop collaborative relationships within the local communities surrounding the Alexander Skutch Biological Corridor in Costa Rica. The purpose is to build a local infrastructure for knowledge transfer which has been described as a ‘contact sport’… it works best when people meet to exchange ideas, sometimes serendipitously, and spot new opportunities. (Tim Minshall. “What Is Knowledge Transfer?” Research Horizons 9 (2009): 22.). La Casita Azul was conceived as such a place where contact would occur amongst community members and for York students, faculty and other researchers. The strategy was to create a space that made it natural for both local community members and York students and faculty to have a sense of belonging. In the first year of operation, all attention was focused on developing a space that was clearly embedded within the communities and meeting community needs. By the second year, several programs have been well established including collaboration with a Costa Rican educational organization to bring much sought after programming/certifications to the local communities. As La Casita Azul enters into its third year, the focus will now shift more to engaging York students with the local communities. York’s new Semester Abroad program begins this Spring/Summer and La Casita Azul will provide opportunities for students to interact with people directly impacted by the type of environmental and social issues raised in their courses.

This session will detail what went into the success of these first 2 years of operation, as well as some of the challenges and pitfalls. Finally, it will describe what the future holds as this 3-year pilot project enters into its last phase.

Library Types:
Academic

Subject Headings:
Community Engagement, International Issues, Partnerships

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Vote for the 2017 ALA Annual Conversation Starters

Suggestion Community-focused programming: 20 great ways to engage your community

by Alee Navarro (staff) on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 11:03 am

Community-focused programming: 20 great ways to engage your community

Speaker:

Community-focused programming: 20 great ways to engage your community

Speaker:

  • Richard Le, Branch Manager, San Francisco Public Library

Description:
Learn how to tap into your local resources for creating fun, sustainable and meaningful programming that engages the entire community. Open your library as a place for community events. Let them play, eat, cook, meditate, express themselves, build things, and show off their talents at the library. The speaker will discuss ideas, tools and various ways to leverage existing community resources and partnerships to build meaningful programs that draw people into the library.

Library Types:
Library School, Nonprofit, Public, Rural, Student, Undergraduate

Subject Headings:
Adult Services, Children’s Services, Community Engagement, Librarianship, Marketing, Partnerships, Public Programs, Public Relations, Public Services, Resource Sharing, Transforming Libraries, Urban Libraries, Young Adult Services, Youth Services

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